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Daniel Peterson

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From Dan's article:

Decades of research consistently link high levels of religiosity with prosocial behavior and success in both academics and social and familial relationships." Such youth are more likely to succeed in school, have a positive outlook on life, and even wear their seatbelts.

So, I've seen religious people bring things like this many times but I never see their take on why this happens. What do you say, Dan? What in religion tends to produce teens who are more 'prosocial' and successful in academics?

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So, I've seen religious people bring things like this many times but I never see their take on why this happens. What do you say, Dan? What in religion tends to produce teens who are more 'prosocial' and successful in academics?

Better yet, why do you think that happens?

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Mormons spend more time than atheists inculcating in their children the virtues of education and the virtues of harmonious social interaction?

Education and social interactions are a byproduct of the feeling that constantly seeing good values provokes. Imagine, for example, that all the time people put on religion (meetings, reading scriptures, etc) is used in the meditation of how to actuate the things the concept of God represents. Instead of dreaming for justice, you think on how to actuate justice. Instead of loving your neighbor, you seek to understand your neighbor. Instead of praying, you work the mechanics of the universe. In fewer words, we start being less religious and more philosophers.

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I'm actually finishing the book up. I have thoroughly enjoyed it. I wrote a recent blog post entitled "It's Because We Aren't Christian..." on the matter. It combines the findings of Dean, Stark, and the Pew Forum. Keep in mind: I wrote it after reviewing some of the threads over at CARM. That might explain my tone a little.

Great article, by the way. And nice comparison to Joseph Smith's First Vision account.

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I'm confused by your response. You ask:

So, I've seen religious people bring things like this many times but I never see their take on why this happens. What do you say, Dan? What in religion tends to produce teens who are more 'prosocial' and successful in academics?

When asked why you think that might be the case you give one possible contributing factor:

The time dedicated to see good values is greater.

To which I ask if you think that is really the case.

Mormons spend more time than atheists inculcating in their children the virtues of education and the virtues of harmonious social interaction?

To which you respond:

Education and social interactions are a byproduct of the feeling that constantly seeing good values provokes. Imagine, for example, that all the time people put on religion (meetings, reading scriptures, etc) is used in the meditation of how to actuate the things the concept of God represents. Instead of dreaming for justice, you think on how to actuate justice. Instead of loving your neighbor, you seek to understand your neighbor. Instead of praying, you work the mechanics of the universe. In fewer words, we start being less religious and more philosophers.

A criticism that Mormons spend too much time on the theory of "good" than the application of it? Yes, I am confused by your response -- its motivation and relevance.

Do or do not Mormons spend more time than atheists on teaching their children good values?

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A criticism that Mormons spend too much time on the theory of "good" than the application of it? Yes, I am confused by your response -- its motivation and relevance.

No, mormons do NOT spend much time in the theory of good... and that is the problem. Actually, most atheists also do not spend much time in the theory of good either but by definition they have less of a constrain to do so. When I became a vegetarian people asked me if, after a time, I had not been sick. They thought that being a vegetarian is just "not eating meat" instead of "eating lots of grains, fruits, vegetables, etc". There are differences in stating each of those and that is how many people see agnosticism/atheism to be: a lack of God when it should be a transcendence or surpassing from God.

Do or do not Mormons spend more time than atheists on teaching their children good values?

They don't need to be teaching anything. There is more "good values" propaganda.

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No, mormons do NOT spend much time in the theory of good... and that is the problem. Actually, most atheists also do not spend much time in the theory of good either but by definition they have less of a constrain to do so. When I became a vegetarian people asked me if, after a time, I had not been sick. They thought that being a vegetarian is just "not eating meat" instead of "eating lots of grains, fruits, vegetables, etc". There are differences in stating each of those and that is how many people see agnosticism/atheism to be: a lack of God when it should be a transcendence or surpassing from God.

...

They don't need to be teaching anything. There is more "good values" propaganda.

Ah, so your theory as to why Mormon teenagers are, on average, better adjusted socially and academically is because (among other reasons) Mormon culture propogandizes (i.e. brainwashing -- to greater or lesser degree) our youth with "good values". But Mormon youth have no real substantive idea why they should be doing things such as being nice or getting a good education. That's one theory. A theory with very little basis in reality, but a theory nonetheless. :P

What are some of the other contributing factors to attend this theory of yours that explains the better-than-average adjustment of LDS youth?

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Ah, so your theory as to why Mormon teenagers are, on average, better adjusted socially and academically is because (among other reasons) Mormon culture propogandizes (i.e. brainwashing -- to greater or lesser degree) our youth with "good values". But Mormon youth have no real substantive idea why they should be doing things such as being nice or getting a good education. That's one theory. A theory with very little basis in reality, but a theory nonetheless. :P

You are so busy trying to find a hole in what I am saying that you didn't bother to understand it. Read this and try hard to understand it first:

Education and social interactions are a byproduct of the feeling that constantly seeing good values provokes. Imagine, for example, that all the time people put on religion (meetings, reading scriptures, etc) is used in the meditation of how to actuate the things the concept of God represents. Instead of dreaming for justice, you think on how to actuate justice. Instead of loving your neighbor, you seek to understand your neighbor. Instead of praying, you work the mechanics of the universe. In fewer words, we start being less religious and more philosophers.

(Hint: being in constant contact with 'good values' propaganda is NOT bad)

What are some of the other contributing factors to attend this theory of yours that explains the better-than-average adjustment of LDS youth?

Bother to understand what I wrote first, Nofear.

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...In fewer words, we start being less religious and more philosophers.

No. Because not all religions or denominations fit the Dark Ages/Science is of the Devil stereotype; some actually encourage their members to seek an education and to study the beliefs of others while still maintaining adherence to the faith; yes, you can actually be religious & smart, and tolerant of others at the same time. The LDS Church is an example of this.

Unfortunately, many atheists in general, including some that I personally knew in high school, seemed to be more willing to indulge in drugs, alcohol, and promiscuity then those that had religious guidelines and standards. And some atheists are as ignorant, intolerant, and bigoted against religion and anything dealing with it on the same level that the WBC hates Gays. :P

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Education and social interactions are a byproduct of the feeling that constantly seeing good values provokes. Imagine, for example, that all the time people put on religion (meetings, reading scriptures, etc) is used in the meditation of how to actuate the things the concept of God represents. Instead of dreaming for justice, you think on how to actuate justice. Instead of loving your neighbor, you seek to understand your neighbor. Instead of praying, you work the mechanics of the universe. In fewer words, we start being less religious and more philosophers.

So why would anyone want to decline so badly? Philosophy is an idea whose time has passed.

No, mormons do NOT spend much time in the theory of good... and that is the problem. Actually, most atheists also do not spend much time in the theory of good either but by definition they have less of a constrain to do so. When I became a vegetarian people asked me if, after a time, I had not been sick. They thought that being a vegetarian is just "not eating meat" instead of "eating lots of grains, fruits, vegetables, etc". There are differences in stating each of those and that is how many people see agnosticism/atheism to be: a lack of God when it should be a transcendence or surpassing from God.

Ah yes, the old atheist/agnostic conceit: "You can keep your primitive superstitions, but we've outgrown such things."

The notion that any mortal could possibly "transcend" or "surpass" God has to be the ultimate in arrogance.

Regards,

Pahoran

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I'm actually finishing the book up. I have thoroughly enjoyed it. I wrote a recent blog post entitled "It's Because We Aren't Christian..." on the matter. It combines the findings of Dean, Stark, and the Pew Forum. Keep in mind: I wrote it after reviewing some of the threads over at CARM. That might explain my tone a little.

Great article, by the way. And nice comparison to Joseph Smith's First Vision account.

Hi WalkerW,

You looked younger than I would have thought, since you seem so educated at times.

Anyway, your blog entry was easy enough to read and was interesting.

What religion was in the youtube children revival video?

Richard

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Hi WalkerW,

You looked younger than I would have thought, since you seem so educated at times.

Anyway, your blog entry was easy enough to read and was interesting.

What religion was in the youtube children revival video?

Richard

Apparently, there are other times when I don't seem educated (which is probably true). :P I'm 24, in case you were wondering.

It is from the film Jesus Camp. Pentacostal or something similar. This was a specific camp and ministry, though.

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