Jump to content

Shipwrecked sailor walks from Mexico to Maine


nosmelone

Recommended Posts

In visiting Michael R. Ash's blog/website I was reading the article entitled "Where did the Book of Mormon take place?" so far it is a great read and I completely agree with it but he mentions in it when speaking of Moroni's possible travels from modern day Mesoamerica to the Hill Cumorah in NY he states,

"That such a trip is not as far-fetched as some might suppose, we know of an account of a shipwrecked sailor who walked for eleven months from Tampico, Mexico to Maine

Link to comment

Well there was a shipwrecked Spanish sailor in Spain's early conquest days traveled over all of Texas and Louisiana. The name escapes me now. That's about 800 miles of coastline. He kept a diary and it's part of study in Texas History in Schools there.

Edit: I remember now. His name was Cabeza De Vaca. He traveled all Southern and Central Texas and along the Gulf Coastline through to the Mississippi River until he was rescued. Detailing the Natives and his survival along with a slave.

Link to comment

Well there was a shipwrecked Spanish sailor in Spain's early conquest days traveled over all of Texas and Louisiana. The name escapes me now. That's about 800 miles of coastline. He kept a diary and it's part of study in Texas History in Schools there.

Edit: I remember now. His name was Cabeza De Vaca. He traveled all Southern and Central Texas and along the Gulf Coastline through to the Mississippi River until he was rescued. Detailing the Natives and his survival along with a slave.

Thanks for that info I will look into this further. Its sounds very interesting!

Link to comment

I was just wanting to know if there is more information about this story of the modern day shipwrecked sailor who walked from Mexico to Maine in 11 months? I guess I just am not familiar with this story and would love to know more about it.

The sailor's name was David Ingram. His account appeared in the first edition of Hakluyt's Principall Navigations. You can read about him here and here.

Link to comment

In visiting Michael R. Ash's blog/website I was reading the article entitled "Where did the Book of Mormon take place?" so far it is a great read and I completely agree with it but he mentions in it when speaking of Moroni's possible travels from modern day Mesoamerica to the Hill Cumorah in NY he states,

"That such a trip is not as far-fetched as some might suppose, we know of an account of a shipwrecked sailor who walked for eleven months from Tampico, Mexico to Maine

Link to comment

Nevo, thanks for the links great information again, it seems to be that both David Ingram and Cabeza De Vaca validate the idea that Moroni upon his last days (after finishing what we know as the end of the Book of Mormon) would be able to trek from modern day central America to modern day upstate NY.

Link to comment

Nevo, thanks for the links great information again, it seems to be that both David Ingram and Cabeza De Vaca validate the idea that Moroni upon his last days (after finishing what we know as the end of the Book of Mormon) would be able to trek from modern day central America to modern day upstate NY.

I'm not sure that David Ingram did actually walk the distance he claimed, but this guy did

Link to comment
I was just wanting to know if there is more information about this story of the modern day shipwrecked sailor who walked from Mexico to Maine in 11 months?

My fourth great grandfather, Francis Martin Pomeroy, was the only survivor of a shipwreck off the coast of Peru in about 1842. He was taken in by a local family and lived with them for two years. He then made his way back to Massachusetts by foot, burro and boat. He then joined the Church and was one of the scouts in the original Pioneer Company with Brigham Young in 1847. He didn't exactly walk back from Peru, but I just couldn't pass up the opportunity to brag about him in this thread.

Link to comment

My fourth great grandfather, Francis Martin Pomeroy, was the only survivor of a shipwreck off the coast of Peru in about 1842. He was taken in by a local family and lived with them for two years. He then made his way back to Massachusetts by foot, burro and boat. He then joined the Church and was one of the scouts in the original Pioneer Company with Brigham Young in 1847. He didn't exactly walk back from Peru, but I just couldn't pass up the opportunity to brag about him in this thread.

Speaking solely as a former sailor (and an incurable romantic who longs for the days of sail, of wooden ships and iron men), all I can say is...uhmmm...darn.

Being rather fond of modern transportation, a good highway system and air conditioning, I stand in awe of our hardy forebearers- whether they walked from Mexico to Maine, Peru to Massachusetts, Omaha to San Diego, or Winter Quarters to Salt Lake City.

I doubt I could do it.

Link to comment

Well there was a shipwrecked Spanish sailor in Spain's early conquest days traveled over all of Texas and Louisiana. The name escapes me now. That's about 800 miles of coastline. He kept a diary and it's part of study in Texas History in Schools there.

Edit: I remember now. His name was Cabeza De Vaca. He traveled all Southern and Central Texas and along the Gulf Coastline through to the Mississippi River until he was rescued. Detailing the Natives and his survival along with a slave.

I vaguely remember hearing this tale during my Texas History classes in Junior High.

IIRC, he had a very interesting time in the stretch of Texas Gulf Coast between what would become Corpus Christ, Galveston, and Orange.....as the natives were notably barbaric- and cannibalism was something less than a spectator sport and more than an avocation....

Link to comment

Interesting.

If a single man can do it in a few months, what keeps a fleeing and fighting nation from doing it in 4 years?

Just so you know not everyone is of the Meso only camp. Some of us are old school. ;-)

Link to comment

No no no, of course not, but this wasn't the Ang Lee version, this was the one made in 2008. Much, much better.

OK, It's been a while since I have seen either, I thought the South American scene was in the earlier one.

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...