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Trees of Righteousness


mercyngrace

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1 The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me; because the Lord hath anointed me to preach good tidings unto the meek; he hath sent me to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, and the opening of the prison to them that are bound;

2 To proclaim the acceptable year of the Lord, and the day of vengeance of our God; to comfort all that mourn;

3 To appoint unto them that mourn in Zion, to give unto them beauty for ashes, the oil of joy for mourning, the garment of praise for the spirit of heaviness; that they might be called trees of righteousness, the planting of the Lord, that he might be glorified.

Any ideas on exactly what a tree of righteousness might be or why a tree would symbolically represent those who receive the preaching of the Lord?

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Any ideas on exactly what a tree of righteousness might be or why a tree would symbolically represent those who receive the preaching of the Lord?

I'm thinking of the allegory of the olive tree in Jacob 5: it has Old World roots!

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Hi, M&G.

A few thoughts:

As far a priesthood connection, see Margaret Barker's commentary on Isaiah 61 in James Dunn and John Rogerson (eds.), Eerdman's Commentary on the Bible (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2003) 538-39. In her reading, the blind and imprisoned are apostate priests in Jerusalem being compared to the fallen priests/angels of the Enoch story who later become come back to the fold and become "trees of righteousness." It is all about the priests and the priesthood. She also points out that the LXX reading is really family or race instead of trees, while the Isaiah Targum reads Princes of righteousness.

In my own reading, the tree of righteousness metaphor appears in other places:

The fruit of the righteous is a tree of life; and he that winneth souls is wise. (Pro
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Hi, M&G.

A few thoughts:

As far a priesthood connection, see Margaret Barker's commentary on Isaiah 61 in James Dunn and John Rogerson (eds.), Eerdman's Commentary on the Bible (Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 2003) 538-39. In her reading, the blind and imprisoned are apostate priests in Jerusalem being compared to the fallen priests/angels of the Enoch story who later become come back to the fold and become "trees of righteousness." It is all about the priests and the priesthood. She also points out that the LXX reading is really family or race instead of trees, while the Isaiah Targum reads Princes of righteousness.

In my own reading, the tree of righteousness metaphor appears in other places:

The fruit of the righteous is a tree of life; and he that winneth souls is wise. (Pro
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Thanks, that helps a lot!

Would you consider the miracle of Aaron's rod related to the concept of trees of righteousness? A dead branch springing to life and suddenly flowering and producing fruit would be like the fallen receiving sight or being freed from prison and becoming trees of rightouesness. Or would that be too much of a stretch, connecting those symbols?

MnG

This would go along with the fig tree, a symbol of the abused priesthood of the Jews, which bore no fruit and which Jesus cursed (Matthew 21:19-21).

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As fallen man, we are branches who have been cut off from the Tree of Life (Eternal Family of God). The Gospel and associated priesthood gives us the means to be grafted in/adopted/sealed back into the Tree of Life, through Christ, to partake of the fullness of the Tree.

Christ is the Vine, we are the Branches.

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As fallen man, we are branches who have been cut off from the Tree of Life (Eternal Family of God). The Gospel and associated priesthood gives us the means to be grafted in/adopted/sealed back into the Tree of Life, through Christ, to partake of the fullness of the Tree.

Christ is the Vine, we are the Branches.

That imagery isn't consistent throughout scripture. See Zechariah for example where Christ is The Branch. Or references to the Christ as the Stem of Jesse.

What I'm specifically trying to ascertain is whether it would be reasonable to say "trees of righteousness" represent priests, princes, or consecrated men.

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