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Elijah's Cup


volgadon

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I thought I'd share one of my earliest blog posts, as today is Passover.

Every Passover, before the passage pour out thy wrath upon the heathen (Psalm 79:6-7) is read, an extra cup- usually the fanciest one- is placed on the table and filled with wine. None of the guests or family touch it, and the door often is opened. This cup is for Elijah the Prophet, who according to legend wanders around the houses of the Jews at Passover time. The origins of this legend are unclear, one theory is that it developed among Jews in Christian lands. In the Middle Ages (and in Eastern Europe until quite recently), Passover was not only a solemn and joyous occasion, but also one of fear and trepidation. This was when blood libels (or alilot dam) were made against the Jews. A Christian belief was that Jews lured Christian children and murdered them, using their blood to make matzahs (the Passover unleavened bread). This was used to whip the mob into a frenzy of righteous indignation, which resulted in severe violence against the Jews and their property. Among the Jews the legend developed that Elijah was sent to protect them from the rioters and so wandered around their homes, much like a policeman patroling his beat. The door was opened to make sure that there were no spies lurking, eavesdropping, or that no dead bodies were placed by their homes.

This legend became intertwined with the tradition of Elijah's cup, which has its origins in an entirely different matter, that of the controversy of the five cups.

The theme of the Passover is salvation and redemption. The Exodus from Egypt is only the backdrop. Despite the repeated allusions tto the past, the focus is on the present and the future.

The Passover haggadah states that in every generation a man must see himself as being led out of Egypt, and must teach this to his sons too. The past is merely a reminder of what the future will be.

One of the Passover scriptures is Exodus 6:6-8:

Wherefore say unto the children of Israel, I am the Lord and I will bring you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians, and I will rid you out of their bondage, and I will redeem you with a stretched out arm, and with great judgments, and I will take you to me for a people, and I will be to you a God: and ye shall know that I am the Lord your God, which bringeth you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians.

And I will bring you unto the land, concerning the which I did swear to give it to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob; and I will give it to you for an heritage: I am the Lord.

At the Passover, four cups are drunk, commemorating the four acts of salvation I marked in bold in that verse. A closer look will show that there are actually five acts. There should be five cups, but as this custom arose in Babylon at a time of exile, several of the Geonim (the spiritual leaders of Babylonian and most world Jewry from the 6th to 11th centuries) several were unsure of the propriety of drinking a cup commemorating being brought into the land, when they were not in it.

Following a sharp controversy, it was decided to settle on a compromise. Five cups could be poured, but only four were to be drunk. The fifth one was set aside for Elijah, meaning that when he would come again as the messenger of the covenant, to herald the Messiah, he would settle all disputes of Jewish law.

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I thought I'd share one of my earliest blog posts, as today is Passover.

Every Passover, before the passage pour out thy wrath upon the heathen (Psalm 79:6-7) is read, an extra cup- usually the fanciest one- is placed on the table and filled with wine. None of the guests or family touch it, and the door often is opened. This cup is for Elijah the Prophet, who according to legend wanders around the houses of the Jews at Passover time. The origins of this legend are unclear, one theory is that it developed among Jews in Christian lands. In the Middle Ages (and in Eastern Europe until quite recently), Passover was not only a solemn and joyous occasion, but also one of fear and trepidation. This was when blood libels were made against the Jews. A Christian belief was that Jews lured Christian children and murdered them, using their blood to make matzahs (the Passover unleavened bread). This was used to whip the mob into a frenzy of righteous indignation, which resulted in severe violence against the Jews and their property. Among the jews the legend developed that Elijah was sent to protect them from the rioters and so wandered around their homes, much like a policeman patroling his beat. The door was opened to make sure that there were no spies lurking, eavesdropping, or that no dead bodies were placed by their homes.

This legend became intertwined with the tradition of Elijah's cup, which has its origins in an entirely different matter, that of the controversy of the five cups.

The theme of the Passover is salvation and redemption. The Exodus from Egypt is only the backdrop. Despite the repeated allusions tto the past, the focus is on the present and the future.

The Passover haggadah states that in every generation a man must see himself as being led out of Egypt, and must teach this to his sons too. The past is merely a reminder of what the future will be.

One of the Passover scriptures is Exodus 6:6-8:

Wherefore say unto the children of Israel, I am the Lord and I will bring you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians, and I will rid you out of their bondage, and I will redeem you with a stretched out arm, and with great judgments, and I will take you to me for a people, and I will be to you a God: and ye shall know that I am the Lord your God, which bringeth you out from under the burdens of the Egyptians.

And I will bring you unto the land, concerning the which I did swear to give it to Abraham, to Isaac, and to Jacob; and I will give it to you for an heritage: I am the Lord.

At the Passover, four cups are drunk, commemorating the four acts of salvation I marked in bold in that verse. A closer look will show that there are actually five acts. There should be five cups, but as this custom arose in Babylon at a time of exile, several of the Geonim (the spiritual leaders of Babylonian and most world Jewry from the 6th to 11th centuries) several were unsure of the propriety of drinking a cup commemorating being brought into the land, when they were not in it.

Following a sharp controversy, it was decided to settle on a compromise. Five cups could be poured, but only four were to be drunk. The fifth one was set aside for Elijah, meaning that when he would come again as the messenger of the covenant, to herald the Messiah, he would settle all disputes of Jewish law.

I got a tremendous amount of resistance in Sunday School for suggesting this cup was meant for Elijah and not "Jesus."

I also got the crickets chirp when I suggested Elijah did return during the passover season at the Kirtland Temple.

Big UP!

Lamanite

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I got a tremendous amount of resistance in Sunday School for suggesting this cup was meant for Elijah and not "Jesus."

I also got the crickets chirp when I suggested Elijah did return during the passover season at the Kirtland Temple.

Big UP!

Lamanite

I wish I was in the same class, would have been sillier for them to argue.

When the crickets chirped you should have mentioned that Joseph Fielding Smith wrote about Elijah coming to the Kirtland temple during the passover season.

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Two questions which are actually comments, parallels or whatever which you probably can flesh out much better than I can

First, we have the use of a hand-shaped cup used for holding incense

Second, we have the five wounds of Christ, (traditionally two on hands two on feet and one in side- we may dispute that but....) and the 5 "acts of salvation" mentioned, and other "5's" we know about in the gospel.

See any links here or am I really stretching it?

Edit: The link if any appears to me to possibly be in the "outstretched arm" portion of your quote - the Lord redeeming with his outstretched arm

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Two questions which are actually comments, parallels or whatever which you probably can flesh out much better than I can

First, we have the use of a hand-shaped cup used for holding incense

Second, we have the five wounds of Christ, (traditionally two on hands two on feet and one in side- we may dispute that but....) and the 5 "acts of salvation" mentioned, and other "5's" we know about in the gospel.

See any links here or am I really stretching it?

Edit: The link if any appears to me to possibly be in the "outstretched arm" portion of your quote - the Lord redeeming with his outstretched arm

I'm a little wary of anything by Lynn Hilton, so I'll have to look into that further, but your comment on the '5's is actually very astute. One of the devices used in scripture is to group things into certain numbers, which then relates to other groups with the same number.

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Two questions which are actually comments, parallels or whatever which you probably can flesh out much better than I can

First, we have the use of a hand-shaped cup used for holding incense

Second, we have the five wounds of Christ, (traditionally two on hands two on feet and one in side- we may dispute that but....) and the 5 "acts of salvation" mentioned, and other "5's" we know about in the gospel.

See any links here or am I really stretching it?

Edit: The link if any appears to me to possibly be in the "outstretched arm" portion of your quote - the Lord redeeming with his outstretched arm

Five_Points.jpg

Another parallel of 5's???

Foot to foot; knee to knee; breast to breast; hand to back; and cheek to cheek, or mouth to ear.

Big UP!

Lamanite

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I wish I was in the same class, would have been sillier for them to argue.

When the crickets chirped you should have mentioned that Joseph Fielding Smith wrote about Elijah coming to the Kirtland temple during the passover season.

I so desperately wish you were there...*sigh*

What's awesome is my biggest antagonist was a young lady who is allegedly two semesters away from receiving a bachelor's in middle Eastern studies. (it may be a post graduate degree, not sure) I asked her if she knew or heard of DCP, she said no. I think there is something fishy going on with her.

Big UP!

Lamanite

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I so desperately wish you were there...*sigh*

What's awesome is my biggest antagonist was a young lady who is allegedly two semesters away from receiving a bachelor's in middle Eastern studies. (it may be a post graduate degree, not sure) I asked her if she knew or heard of DCP, she said no. I think there is something fishy going on with her.

Big UP!

Lamanite

Actually, I;ve met a lot of people taking or who have taken Middle Eastern Studies who know very little about that region.

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Actually, I;ve met a lot of people taking or who have taken Middle Eastern Studies who know very little about that region.

That's comforting. I hereby bestow all the rights and privileges of the Masters of the Universe as it specifically relates to the Middle East to the honorable Lamanite J.D., M.D., Esquire, A.P.R.N, and water diviner. BY the Powers of GraySkull....I have the POWER!!!

Big UP!

Lamanite

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Another parallel of 5's???

Lamanite

Yep, those were the "other 5's" I was talking about.

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