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Pslams 82:6 - an overlooked message.


Zakuska

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We are all familiar with the hottly debated Pslam among Mormons and EV Christians...

Pslams 82

7 But ye shall die like men, and fall like one of the princes.

Christians object to LDS interpretation of the verse because "Gods don't die."

Here is where I think Evangelicals make a fatal mistake...

1) Christ Died

2) Adam was Imortal, he ate the fruit and died.

So we have at least 2 scriptural examples of Imortals Dieing.

We can further identify who is being spoken about by the second part of the verse...

1) Satan Fell from Heaven

2) Adam fell that men might be.

So we have an 2 additional scriptural examples of Immortals falling.

When was the last time you saw a man fall from heaven?

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We are all familiar with the hottly debated Pslam among Mormons and EV Christians...

Pslams 82

7 But ye shall die like men, and fall like one of the princes.

Christians object to LDS interpretation of the verse because "Gods don't die."

Here is where I think Evangelicals make a fatal mistake...

1) Christ Died

2) Adam was Imortal, he ate the fruit and died.

So we have at least 2 scriptural examples of Imortals Dieing.

We can further identify who is being spoken about by the second part of the verse...

1) Satan Fell from Heaven

2) Adam fell that men might be.

So we have an 2 additional scriptural examples of Immortals falling.

When was the last time you saw a man fall from heaven?

Interesting that you connect it to them. Michael Heiser actually translates it, "But you shall die like Adam, and fall like one of the Shining Ones."

His footnotes on this translation are as follows:

"The translation choice "Adam" reflects the connection that exists between (1) presence of the "Shining One" (Lucifer) in Isaiah 14:12-15 in the holy Mount - the Mount of the Assembly (the place where the council met) and the designation of Eden, the garden of God, as the Mount of Assembly in Ezekiel 28; and (2) the reference to a certain "Shining One" in Psalm 82:7."

"The Hebrew here...is usually translated "like one of the princes," under the assumption that the noun is related to the Akkadian s,arru , meaning "ruler, prince" (BDB, 978a). This is the correct Akkadian cognate, but contrary to the information in BDB (977b), which asserts that the related verbal root s,araru most likely does not mean "rise in splendor" (in reference to the sun, and so "shine"), subsequent scholarship has demonstrated otherwise. While there may be some question that the verbal form s,araru may not be used with "shine" as its meaning, the adjective form s,aru4ru certainly does mean "shining," as evidenced by its use to describe the planet Venus in astronomical texts (Page: 97, note 134) . Psalm 82:7 would therefore contain a substantive use of the cognate adjective...It should be pointed out that this argument from the cognates is not necessary for further evidence that the personages in Psalm 82 are divine beings, since...its meaning of "prince" is used in Daniel to identify divine beings - those...who still rule the nations, and Michael, guardian of God's portion, Israel (Dan. 10:13, 20-21; 12:1; cp. Deut. 4:19; 32:8-9)." (Heiser, "Divine Council 101: Lesson 2: The elohim of Psalm 82 - gods or men?") Found here: http://www.thedivine...82_overview.pdf

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We are all familiar with the hottly debated Pslam among Mormons and EV Christians...

Pslams 82

7 But ye shall die like men, and fall like one of the princes.

Christians object to LDS interpretation of the verse because "Gods don't die."

Here is where I think Evangelicals make a fatal mistake...

1) Christ Died

2) Adam was Imortal, he ate the fruit and died.

So we have at least 2 scriptural examples of Imortals Dieing.

We can further identify who is being spoken about by the second part of the verse...

1) Satan Fell from Heaven

2) Adam fell that men might be.

So we have an 2 additional scriptural examples of Immortals falling.

When was the last time you saw a man fall from heaven?

If you place the passage under a different context one in which the passage mirrors other Mesopotamian court scenarios then you will indeed see that gods do die. In fact, the first man was a creation of the earth plus the blood of the slain god, We. In addition Tiamat is slain by the Marduk. The ancient gods might be immortal but not impervious to death.

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