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Name change from Saul to Paul


Thorkyll

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A Gentile who converted to Judaism would have changed from having a hellenic name to having a Hebrew name.

Yet when "Saul" converted to Christianity, he changed from having a Hebrew name to having a hellenic name (Paulus).

This is no small matter. The taking on of a new name implies change of a more fundamental nature, such as spiritual rebirth.

To me, it seems a blatant admission that Christianity is hellenistic. What do you think? :P

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A Gentile who converted to Judaism would have changed from having a hellenic name to having a Hebrew name.

Yet when "Saul" converted to Christianity, he changed from having a Hebrew name to having a hellenic name (Paulus).

This is no small matter. The taking on of a new name implies change of a more fundamental nature, such as spiritual rebirth.

To me, it seems a blatant admission that Christianity is hellenistic. What do you think? :P

I don't know that any one would argue with taht. Were do you suppose the creeds came from?

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Curious, is there a hebrew name that would mean "rock"?. . or what is the closest it could be?

Added. . . what does the actual passage say in hebrew?

What passage are you referring to? Matthew 16:18?

"Peter" is called "Cephas" in the New Testament

which is from the Hebrew for rock.

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I don't know that any one would argue with taht. Were do you suppose the creeds came from?

Yeh, but I thought being hellenic would be seen as a bad thing by Christians (and Mormons, as Christians)...seeing as they were a bunch of pagans.

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Yeh, but I thought being hellenic would be seen as a bad thing by Christians (and Mormons, as Christians)...seeing as they were a bunch of pagans.

Hellenistic influences on Judaism are partially responsible for the cherished beliefs about God all us modern Christians (including Mormons) hold.

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Yeh, but I thought being hellenic would be seen as a bad thing by Christians (and Mormons, as Christians)...seeing as they were a bunch of pagans.

If it is seen as a bad thing why would they accpet the creeds that inspired by the hellenists? That is the problem I have. I don't beleive the hellenists to have been inspired and the creeds are just of man. Hence the need for a restoration as they were in a state of apostacy.

Some poeple even have a problem with Paul and think that his words shouldn't even be in the bible. This is not the offical LDS position though.

I would be curious for some of our other frinds to comment on this.

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Sorry if I was confusing. What I'm curious to know is if there is a hebrew equivelent for the name Paul if it is a not a hebrew name?

Paulus (Latin) means small, apparently;

Hebrew for small is katan.

...so Paulus and Saul (Shaul) are not equivalent to each other.

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It just makes it all the more curious that he chose the name "Paulus"....

My guess would be that it was related to stature or position... though there are other permutations that are quite funny.

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This is instructive...

The New Testament records in Acts 13 that Saul changed his name to Paul. Why did he do this? Many commentators have sought to find the answer in the help that Sergius Paulus, governor of Cyprus, provided to Saul and Barnabas on their first journey there. While it is possible that respect and gratitude inspired Saul to take the governor
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It just makes it all the more curious that he chose the name "Paulus"....

well the other meaning it gave for "Paul" was "humble". . . so if it is "small" and "humble" then that would suggest that Saul was put in his place next to God (small). . .or made humble.

As you can tell, I'm not a bible scholar, and what we know as an English translation, would be a precise translation.

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A Gentile who converted to Judaism would have changed from having a hellenic name to having a Hebrew name.

Yet when "Saul" converted to Christianity, he changed from having a Hebrew name to having a hellenic name (Paulus).

This is no small matter. The taking on of a new name implies change of a more fundamental nature,

such as spiritual rebirth.

To me, it seems a blatant admission that Christianity is hellenistic. What do you think?

I think it may have helped him get along in Roman society, outside of Palestine. As for

his being "hellenistic," he seems like a changeable sort of guy -- so perhaps that is

where he ended up. That is, if we can define "hellenistic" as a single philosophy or

world-view. So far as I can tell, it was more of a toleration of various cultures and

religions, under a thin coating of late Greek culture.

I'm not even sure that Saul qualifies as a Jew of the tribe of Benjamin -- I think he

was more likely a Herodian with family roots in Edom and tangential ties to Judaism.

Whatever was the case, his brand of religion eventually became the most powerful

force in the Roman Empire. The Ebionites back in Jerusalem must have looked upon

that evolution with dismay; and then with horror, from their later residence in Pella.

UD

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A Gentile who converted to Judaism would have changed from having a hellenic name to having a Hebrew name.

Yet when "Saul" converted to Christianity, he changed from having a Hebrew name to having a hellenic name (Paulus).

This is no small matter. The taking on of a new name implies change of a more fundamental nature, such as spiritual rebirth.

To me, it seems a blatant admission that Christianity is hellenistic. What do you think? :P

Paul was sent to the Gentiles, and so he blended in.

It is the Mormon faith that the Lord turned against the Jews and Israel after the life of Christ and it became what is known as "the times of the Gentiles".

But even though the Lord turned against the Jews and Israel, and worked through the Holy Ghost among the Gentiles, they likewise had plenty of problems. They eventually fell into what is known as the Great Apostacy. The creeds was part of that apostacy. But it was their day, and the Lord did the best He could with them.

In early America the Prophet Joseph restored the Gospel to the Gentiles, but laid the foundation for a coming Latter-day SHIFT wherein the Lord will turn against the Gentiles and restore again to His ancient covenant people Israel all their former blessings.

Richard

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...the Lord turned against the Jews and Israel, and worked through the Holy Ghost...

According to Mormons, what was the date when our Heavenly father answered

the last Jewish mother's prayer for her sick children?

When was the final acceptable sacrifice in the Jerusalem Temple?

When was the last time The Lord protected a God-fearing Jew from an enemy's assault?

Uncle Dale

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The OP suggests that Paulus is Hellenistic, but no, Paulus is a Latin, not a Greek name. I'm surprised no-one has pointed this out already. Paul was a Roman citizen, and since he was basically ministering to the Gentiles, it is clear that he would choose a Gentile name, and to emphasize that citizenship (which served as a protection due to the rights of citizens), of course he would choose a Roman/Latin name. The other speculations, regarding "short", "little", or "humble" are of course appropo, and probably all served Paul's purpose.

Nothing is wrong with Greek philosophy, except where it works against true Gospel doctrine, which is what some LDS have a problem with, not that any are anti-Hellenic.

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