Jump to content

Book of Mormon Vocabulary I find Impressive


Olavarria

Recommended Posts

SHEUMMosiah 9:9

9)And we began to till the ground, yea, even with all manner of seeds, with seeds of corn, and of wheat, and of barley, and with neas, and with sheum, and with seeds of all manner of fruits; and we did begin to multiply and prosper in the land.

Another interesting word in the Book of Mormon is sheum. In the Book of Mormon, sheum is the name of a particular grain. In Akkadian, ?e'um(pronounced sheum) is barley. It should be noted that the founders of the Jaredite ruling lineage originated in Mesopotamia. Sheum might be a frozen form acquired via Jaredite-Mulekite contacts.

Nephi

John Gee has demonstrated that Nephi is an attested Syro-Palestinian Semitic form of Nfr, an attested Egyptian man's name dating from the Late Period in Egypt.

Moroni tells us that the Book of Mormon was written in what they called "the reformed Egyptian"(Moroni 9:32). It should be noted that the Egyptian word "nfr" means "good,beautiful,perfect"(1). Keeping these Egyptian items in mind allows us to detect paronomasia in the Book of Mormon. If Nephi is the Semetic transliteration of Nfr, then the Nephites(Nfr-ites) would literally be the "good/beautiful/perfect ones".

Morm. 6: 17-19

17) O ye fair ones, how could ye have departed from the ways of the Lord! O ye fair ones, how could ye have rejected that Jesus, who stood with open arms to receive you!

18) Behold, if ye had not done this, ye would not have fallen. But behold, ye are fallen, and I mourn your loss.

19) O ye fair sons and daughters, ye fathers and mothers, ye husbands and wives, ye fair ones, how is it that ye could have fallen!

3 Ne. 2: 16

16) And their young men and their daughters became exceedingly fair, and they were numbered among the Nephites, and were called Nephites. And thus ended the thirteenth year.

Sources

(1)James P. Allen; Middle Egyptian: An Introduction to the Language and Culture of Hieroglyphics,Cambridge University Press, 2000.

(2)This guy noticed it first.

Ziff

Mosiah 11:3,8

3)And he laid a tax of one fifth part of all they possessed, a fifth part of their gold and of their silver, and a fifth part of their ziff, and of their copper, and of their brass and their iron; and a fifth part of their fatlings; and also a fifth part of all their grain.

8)And it came to pass that king Noah built many elegant and spacious buildings; and he ornamented them with fine work of wood, and of all manner of precious things, of gold, and of silver, and of iron, and of brass, and of ziff, and of copper;

Another interesting name in the Book of Mormon is ziff. In the Book of Mormon, ziff is the name of a certain metal. In Hebrew, ziv(זִיו) means "brightness" or "splendor"(Daniel 4:33). The Nephite ziff could have been electrum, tumbaga or tin. Who knows? It's a nice name for a metal though :-)

Jershon

The yod (יִ) in Hebrew is often rendered as "j" in English; for example:Judah (יהוּדָה) and Joseph (יוֹסֵף). Following that convention, Jershon could well be rendered as Yershon. In Hebrew, the verb יִרְשׁוּ(yrshu) can be translated as "inherit"(Psalms 37:9). It can also be translated as "possess"(Obediah 1:20).

We should also remember that waw(וַ), when placed before a verb, makes the future tense into past tense and vis versa. With waw(וַ), possess(יִרְשׁוּ) is turned into and possessed(וַיִּרְשׁוּ)(Joshua 19:47). When we keep these Hebrew items in mind, we see a cognate accusative that is visible in Hebrew, but not in English.

Alma 27:24

24) And now behold, this will we do unto our brethren, that they may inherit(יִרְשׁוּ) the land Jershon;....

Alma 27:26

26)And it came to pass that it did cause great joy among them. And they went down into the land of Jershon, and took possession(וַיִּרְשׁוּ) of the land of Jershon; and they were called by the Nephites the people of Ammon; therefore they were distinguished by that name ever after.

Mosiah

One of the most interesting names in the Book of Mormon is Mosiah. Mosiah was the name of two kings and one book. The questian is: what is a mosiah? Moshiah(מושיע) means "deliverer", as in Isaiah 43:11.

The Hebrew word for save or deliver is yasha(ישע). When the letters yod(י), waw(ו) and mem(מ)are added, we get: moshiah(מושיע), a hiphil participle verb. Keeping this Hebrew note in mind, that moshiah(מושיע)and yasha(ישע)are cognates, allows us to find paronomasia in the Book of Mormon.

Alma 17: 35

Therefore they did not fear Ammon, for they supposed that one of their men could slay him according to their pleasure, for they knew not that the Lord had promised Mosiah(מושיע) that he would deliver(ישע) his sons out of their hands.

Mulek

Helaman 8:21

21) And now will you dispute that Jerusalem was destroyed? Will ye say that the sons of Zedekiah were not slain, all except it were Mulek? Yea, and do ye not behold that the seed of Zedekiah are with us, and they were driven out of the land of Jerusalem? But behold, this is not all?

Jeremiah 38:6

6) Then took they Jeremiah, and cast him into the dungeon of Malchiah the son of Hammelech, that was in the court of the prison: and they let down Jeremiah with cords. And in the dungeon there was no water, but mire: so Jeremiah sunk in the mire.

The Hebrew phrase that is "translated" as Malchiah son of Hammelech is actually MalkiYahu ben-ha-Melek. In Hebrew, MalkiYahu ben-ha-Melekmeans "MalkiYahu, Son of the King".

But was this MalkiYahu the same person as Mulek? Maybe. In the case of Baruch the scribe of Jeremiah(Jer.36), the long form of his name is BerekYahu. If BerekYahu can be shortened to Baruch then MalkiYahu could concievably be shortened to Mulek.

Notes

(1)"New Information about Mulek, Son of the King" by Robert F. Smith

(2) "Has the Seal of Mulek Been Found?" by Jeffrey R. Chadwick

Link to comment

The problem with your interpretation of the word Sheum is that although we don't know what it is, we know what it is not. From the sentence it can be rightly inferred that Sheum is not corn, wheat barley or neas, otherwise it would be a nonsensical entry in a list.

?e ' u , ?e ' ? [?E.PAD.ME? : ]

[Country → Agriculture]

: barley , grain : wheat (?) , pine kernel , grain as a unit of measure

http://www.premiumwanadoo.com/cuneiform.languages/dictionary/dosearch.php?searchkey=5124&language=id

"It is a well-known fact," writes Professor Hildegard Lewy, a specialist in ancient Assyrian and Babylonian (Akkadian) languages, "that the names of plants and particularly of [grains] are applied in various languages and dialects to different species." Lewy notes that this often poses a challenge in interpreting references to cereals in Near Eastern documents. When doing so, "the meaning of these Old Assyrian terms must be inferred from the Old Assyrian texts alone without regard to their signification in sources from Babylonia and other regions adjacent to Assyria."1 Other Assyriologists have observed that the ancient Assyrian term sheum was used at various times to refer to barley, grains generally, and even pine nuts.2
http://mi.byu.edu/publications/transcripts/?id=126
Link to comment

The problem with your interpretation of the word Sheum is that although we don't know what it is, we know what it is not. From the sentence it can be rightly inferred that Sheum is not corn, wheat barley or neas, otherwise it would be a nonsensical entry in a list.

The BoM is clearly using it in the context of grains. It's kinda like "corn" in the KJV and corn(maize) in the NW. The word "corn" is applied to grains in both cases.

Link to comment

?e ' u , ?e ' ? [?E.PAD.ME? : ]

[Country → Agriculture]

: barley , grain : wheat (?) , pine kernel , grain as a unit of measure

http://www.premiumwanadoo.com/cuneiform.languages/dictionary/dosearch.php?searchkey=5124&language=id

http://mi.byu.edu/publications/transcripts/?id=126

Why would a Babylonian word help your cause at all? Any two languages taken at random have cognate pairs. This does not prove anything unless you can show the provenance of how a Babylonian word got into the Book of Mormon in the first place.

Link to comment

Why would a Babylonian word help your cause at all? Any two languages taken at random have cognate pairs.

Are you saying BoM sheum and Akkadian sheum are cognates?

This does not prove anything unless you can show the provenance of how a Babylonian word got into the Book of Mormon in the first place.

Jaredites

Link to comment

Mosiah 9:9

9)And we began to till the ground, yea, even with all manner of seeds, with seeds of corn, and of wheat, and of barley, and with neas, and with sheum, and with seeds of all manner of fruits; and we did begin to multiply and prosper in the land.

The High middle English word of the word corn simply meant grain. It changed over time to solely mean maize. You contend that in the Book of Mormon it meant both. I am asking you to prove that assertion.

Link to comment

The BoM is clearly using it in the context of grains.

I don't think that's clear at all. The words "neas" and "sheum" could just as easily be grouped with "all manner of fruits" (which they immediately precede in the verse), or even something altogether different, such as squash or spuds.

The fact that everything except those two non-English words specifies "seeds of" is interesting.

Link to comment

The Jaredites spoke Babylonian?

If the book of Ether (which confirms the bible story of the Tower and the confounding of languages) is to be believed, shouldn't the language of the Jaredites be something completely different from any of the "confounded" languages of people who remained in the old world?

Link to comment

The High middle English word of the word corn simply meant grain. It changed over time to solely mean maize. You contend that in the Book of Mormon it meant both. I am asking you to prove that assertion.

Ohhh I get cha now. No, when I used the example of "corn", I was simply using it to describe what you just said. I think corn is to corn, what sheum is to sheum. Know what I mean?

Link to comment

I don't think that's clear at all. The words "neas" and "sheum" could just as easily be grouped with "all manner of fruits" (which they immediately precede in the verse), or even something altogether different, such as squash or spuds.

The fact that everything except those two non-English words specifies "seeds of" is interesting.

I think the "seed" thing is interesting too. In hebrew, זֶרַע means "seed; kernel sperm" http://www.milon.co.il/general/general.php?term=%D7%96%D6%B6%D7%A8%D6%B7%D7%A2.

Mosiah 9:9

9)And we began to till the ground, yea, even with all manner of seeds, with seeds of corn(grain), and of wheat(grain), and of barley(grain), and with neas(?), and with sheum(?), and with seeds of all manner of fruits(not grain); and we did begin to multiply and prosper in the land.

It seems clear to me, but....

Link to comment

Mosiah 9:9

9)And we began to till the ground, yea, even with all manner of seeds, with seeds of corn(grain), and of wheat(grain), and of barley(grain), and with neas(?), and with sheum(?), and with seeds of all manner of fruits(not grain); and we did begin to multiply and prosper in the land.

It seems clear to me, but....

Of the eight ANDs in the sentence, I see no reason to focus on that one.

Let's see. You have six items in a comma-separated list, three preceded by "of" and three by "with." I would say the list breaks with this change, which is after the three grains mentioned. If I substitute the non-grains I mentioned for the unknown words, the list works just as well as if they were grains:

... even with all manner of seeds, with seeds of corn, and of wheat, and of barley,

and with potatoes, and with squash, and with seeds of all manner of fruits...

For that matter, to further deconstruct a poorly constructed sentence, the mystery words may not be seeds at all, because if we add in the unspoken words, we have the following:

with:

- seeds of corn

- [seeds] of wheat

- [seeds] of barley

- neas

- sheum

- seeds of... fruits

The mystery words are really out of place in the list, inserted in the middle and breaking up the parallel structure.

Link to comment

I don't think that's clear at all. The words "neas" and "sheum" could just as easily be grouped with "all manner of fruits" (which they immediately precede in the verse), or even something altogether different, such as squash or spuds.

The fact that everything except those two non-English words specifies "seeds of" is interesting.

Well, at the very least, what we have is an agricultural context.

Link to comment

Of the eight ANDs in the sentence, I see no reason to focus on that one.

Let's see. You have six items in a comma-separated list, three preceded by "of" and three by "with." I would say the list breaks with this change, which is after the three grains mentioned. If I substitute the non-grains I mentioned for the unknown words, the list works just as well as if they were grains:

... even with all manner of seeds, with seeds of corn, and of wheat, and of barley,

and with potatoes, and with squash, and with seeds of all manner of fruits...

For that matter, to further deconstruct a poorly constructed sentence, the mystery words may not be seeds at all, because if we add in the unspoken words, we have the following:

with:

- seeds of corn

- [seeds] of wheat

- [seeds] of barley

- neas

- sheum

- seeds of... fruits

The mystery words are really out of place in the list, inserted in the middle and breaking up the parallel structure.

I think the emphasis should have been placed on the "and with seeds" of all manner of fruit...etc. Meaning that the first 5 items were listed under the grain list, then the next set began fruits. The author took notice to re-emphasize the word of seeds again when he switched to a different produce item (fruit). I think that is what he was alluding to.

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...