Jump to content

The Book of Mormon


Daniel Peterson

Recommended Posts

Immediately after having dinner this evening with Royal Skousen and his wife (and my wife), Royal and I headed over to one of my offices, where, I had been told, a package was waiting for me. We were both pleased to find, in it, a copy of Professor Skousen's edition of The Book of Mormon: The Earliest Text (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009):

http://www.amazon.com/Book-Mormon-Earliest-Text/dp/0300142188

This new volume represents some of the results of his two decades of work on the textual history of the Book of Mormon, as these have been published (so far) by FARMS (now the Maxwell Institute). He will continue to publish commentary on that textual history with us, as well as really interesting reflections on the discipline of text criticism, but, in this book, readers will have his "bottom line" conclusions as to how the text should read.

One of the nice features of this edition, too, is that the entire text of the Book of Mormon is written out in what Professor Skousen calls "sense lines," which, in my opinion, help considerably with readability. The text is not divided into columns, and verses are marked off only by numbers in the margin. The volume is very elegantly produced, and, by conscious design, lies effortlessly open on a table. A must-buy, in my opinion, for serious students and readers of the Book of Mormon.

Link to comment

Immediately after having dinner this evening with Royal Skousen and his wife (and my wife), Royal and I headed over to one of my offices, where, I had been told, a package was waiting for me. We were both pleased to find, in it, a copy of Professor Skousen's edition of The Book of Mormon: The Earliest Text (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009):

http://www.amazon.co...t/dp/0300142188

This new volume represents some of the results of his two decades of work on the textual history of the Book of Mormon, as these have been published (so far) by FARMS (now the Maxwell Institute). He will continue to publish commentary on that textual history with us, as well as really interesting reflections on the discipline of text criticism, but, in this book, readers will have his "bottom line" conclusions as to how the text should read.

One of the nice features of this edition, too, is that the entire text of the Book of Mormon is written out in what Professor Skousen calls "sense lines," which, in my opinion, help considerably with readability. The text is not divided into columns, and verses are marked off only by numbers in the margin. The volume is very elegantly produced, and, by conscious design, lies effortlessly open on a table. A must-buy, in my opinion, for serious students and readers of the Book of Mormon.

I am curious as to how given the fact that you just received one of the earliest copies of the new text can it already be listed on Amazon as having some 'used' copies? Are these pre-publication editions or what?

Link to comment

I am curious as to how given the fact that you just received one of the earliest copies of the new text can it already be listed on Amazon as having some 'used' copies? Are these pre-publication editions or what?

I think it's some kind of marketing ploy.

update After being criticized by a literary group for selling used books online, Amazon is striking back, recruiting sellers to help it argue that its policy is good for the publishing industry and for readers.

In a letter to merchants who sell used books online through Amazon, CEO Jeff Bezos defended the company's policy, saying that "Amazon.com is now, and has always been, supportive of and good for authors."

In the letter, a copy of which was posted to a Usenet discussion group, Bezos asks booksellers to write to the Author's Guild "explaining how the sale of used books actually helps the entire book industry."

The Authors Guild, the largest organization representing published authors, asked its members earlier this month to remove links to Amazon from their Web sites.

The Guild has already received about 4,000 e-mails in favor of Amazon, said Kay Murray, general counsel. Amazon spokesman Bill Curry said Bezos sent the letter to "tens of thousands" of sellers of used books Sunday night.

The Guild argues that Amazon's policy of listing used copies next to new versions of the same book for sale "does damage to the publishing industry and decreasing royalty payments to authors and profits to publishers."

But in his letter, Bezos countered that offering the used books encourages customers to visit the site more frequently and buy more books. And buying some books at a cheaper price "gives them a budget to buy more new books."

In an argument familiar to those who have followed the debate over online music, Bezos pointed out that those who buy a book "are also buying the right to resell that book, to loan it out, or to even give it away if they want."

While he encouraged the used booksellers to be "polite and civil" in their letters to the Guild, he did take a few swipes at it himself, saying that this "is the same organization that from time to time has advocated charging public libraries royalties on books they loan out."

A statement on the Authors Guild site says the Guild advocated 15 years ago for a government-funded royalty paid to authors of books borrowed from libraries.

Murray called Bezos' arguments regarding used-book sales "disingenuous," saying, "All we've done is tell our members that it's not in their economic interests to link to Amazon."

"We do not oppose used-book sales. And we did not ever take that position," Murray said. "What we oppose is the aggressive marketing of used copies of new titles. It's very clear if you go on the Amazon Web site and punch in a title or author you're going to be urged to buy the book used."

(Emphasis added)

Amazon defends used-book sales.

Link to comment

So just so I am up to speed here what is the difference between this new copy and the reprinted first edition ones (those little brown copies published by Herald House) and also the copy I have in my quad? Thanks!

Link to comment

Immediately after having dinner this evening with Royal Skousen and his wife (and my wife), Royal and I headed over to one of my offices, where, I had been told, a package was waiting for me. We were both pleased to find, in it, a copy of Professor Skousen's edition of The Book of Mormon: The Earliest Text (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009):

http://www.amazon.com/Book-Mormon-Earliest-Text/dp/0300142188

This new volume represents some of the results of his two decades of work on the textual history of the Book of Mormon, as these have been published (so far) by FARMS (now the Maxwell Institute). He will continue to publish commentary on that textual history with us, as well as really interesting reflections on the discipline of text criticism, but, in this book, readers will have his "bottom line" conclusions as to how the text should read.

One of the nice features of this edition, too, is that the entire text of the Book of Mormon is written out in what Professor Skousen calls "sense lines," which, in my opinion, help considerably with readability. The text is not divided into columns, and verses are marked off only by numbers in the margin. The volume is very elegantly produced, and, by conscious design, lies effortlessly open on a table. A must-buy, in my opinion, for serious students and readers of the Book of Mormon.

I just received notice from Amazon that my copy is on its way! I am very excited to read it as I have long-admired Royal's work.

Link to comment

Sounds interesting. From Amazon.com

Over the past twenty-one years, editor Royal Skousen has pored over Joseph Smithâ??s original manuscripts and identified more than 2,000 textual errors in the 1830 edition. Although most of these discrepancies stem from inadvertent errors in copying and typesetting the text, the Yale edition contains about 600 corrections that have never appeared in any standard edition of the Book of Mormon, and about 250 of them affect the textâ??s meaning.

Do we have some good examples of changes in meaning?

Link to comment

Well, perhaps the most shocking revelation that came from Royal's study is that Jesus' name is actually Craig.

:P;)

OK, seriously, though. Anyone who wants to throw in a little assistance is welcome to join a conversation on my bog post about this publication.

I did the blog post as a primer/preview of the publication and was flattered to see that Yale press included a link to my blof post on their Twitter feed. :crazy:

Unfortunately, someone named "Latayne Scott," a publishing critic of the Church (I believe turned-Evangelical) also noticed my blog and made Skousen's publication the #89 reason why she "won't return to Mormonism" or whatever. An interesting discussion ensued where it became evident she didn't really know what she was talking about.

http://www.lifeongoldplates.com/2009/08/royal.html

Link to comment

Will those who claimed that Joseph "used his own words" in the process apologize?

Oh, you mean people like Stephen Ricks, Brant Gardner, Kevin Barney, Philip Barlow, David Bokovoy, Daniel McClellan et al.? No, I don't think so.

Link to comment

Oh, you mean people like Stephen Ricks, Brant Gardner, Kevin Barney, Philip Barlow, David Bokovoy, Daniel McClellan et al.? No, I don't think so.

How will they deal with this now:

8 But, behold, I say unto you, that you must study it out in your mind; then you must ask me if it be right, and if it is right I will cause that your bosom shall burn within you; therefore, you shall feel that it is right.

9 But if it be not right you shall have no such feelings, but you shall have a stupor of thought that shall cause you to forget the thing which is wrong; therefore, you cannot write that which is sacred save it be given you from me.

Link to comment

So just so I am up to speed here what is the difference between this new copy and the reprinted first edition ones (those little brown copies published by Herald House) and also the copy I have in my quad? Thanks!

Adds back in a lot of came to passes which were deleted along the way (your brown reprint has the came to passes as well), and other stuff to get back closer to the first edition. But it goes further, trying to get back to the original text (manuscripts and even the dictated text). There was stuff messed up even in the first edition in the typesetting process, and before that copying errors from the original manuscript to the printer's manuscript.

For example, this edition says "as well in this time" instead of "as well in these times" in 1N 10:19. Another: "the sword of the justice of the Eternal God" instead of "the word of the justice of the Eternal God" in 1N 12:18. As mentioned by nackhadlow, all Amalekites become Amlicites as they always should have been. Both the whatevers become whatsoevers. These are readings which have never been published in any previous edition of the Book of Mormon. They attempt to bring us back, to the extent possible, to the original English words as they fell from the lips of Joseph Smith.

Link to comment

Adds back in a lot of came to passes which were deleted along the way (your brown reprint has the came to passes as well), and other stuff to get back closer to the first edition. But it goes further, trying to get back to the original text (manuscripts and even the dictated text). There was stuff messed up even in the first edition in the typesetting process, and before that copying errors from the original manuscript to the printer's manuscript.

For example, this edition says "as well in this time" instead of "as well in these times" in 1N 10:19. Another: "the sword of the justice of the Eternal God" instead of "the word of the justice of the Eternal God" in 1N 12:18. As mentioned by nackhadlow, all Amalekites become Amlicites as they always should have been. Both the whatevers become whatsoevers. These are readings which have never been published in any previous edition of the Book of Mormon. They attempt to bring us back, to the extent possible, to the original English words as they fell from the lips of Joseph Smith.

Thanks for that. Care to put up the Introduction so we can read it?

Link to comment

Immediately after having dinner this evening with Royal Skousen and his wife (and my wife), Royal and I headed over to one of my offices, where, I had been told, a package was waiting for me. We were both pleased to find, in it, a copy of Professor Skousen's edition of The Book of Mormon: The Earliest Text (New Haven and London: Yale University Press, 2009):

Please post the Introduction.

Link to comment

rofl.gifrofl.gif

OK, seriously, though. Anyone who wants to throw in a little assistance is welcome to join a conversation on my bog post about this publication.

I did the blog post as a primer/preview of the publication and was flattered to see that Yale press included a link to my blof post on their Twitter feed. good.gif

Unfortunately, someone named "Latayne Scott," a publishing critic of the Church (I believe turned-Evangelical) also noticed my blog and made Skousen's publication the #89 reason why she "won't return to Mormonism" or whatever. An interesting discussion ensued where it became evident she didn't really know what she was talking about.

http://www.lifeongol...9/08/royal.html

As you said, a very interesting exchange.

But do you suppose you could go back and edit the part where you talk about "Hebrew/Egyptian/Pidgeon"? I'm relatively certain that not only do pidgeons not have a language, even if they did it would not be a Semitic one. I think the word you were looking for was "pidgin." wink.gif

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...