Jump to content

Best Books On The Testaments


gtaggart

Recommended Posts

Bump

A few books on my desktop at the moment, I'd recommend:

Joseph Blenkinsopp's "Sage, Priest, Prophet..."

Israel Finkelstein's "Living on the Fringe..."

Richard Friedmann's "Who Wrote the Bible"

Charles Cochrane's "Christianity and Classical Culture"

C. K. Barrett's "New Testament Background"

Joachim Jeremias' "New Testament Theology"

and, of course, the "Anchor Bible Dictionary" and the entire

set of "Anchor Bible" texts-commentaries.

I have lots of other favorites -- but those are ones I happened to have open on my desk today.

Uncle Dale

Link to comment

A must have,reviewed by FARMS,From the Last Supper through the Resurrection

When members of the church go to their local bookstore and browse the section containing Latter-day Saint titles, they may see a new book, From the Last Supper through the Resurrection. They may notice it is published by Deseret Book and put it back on the shelf, assuming it is just another book on the New Testament by and for Latter-day Saints. If they do this, they will have made a mistake. Those in the church who are serious about their study of the scriptures should own and read this book. It focuses on key events in the last two days of the Saviorâ??s mortal ministry and may well prove to be the most important scholarly book on the New Testament written by faithful Latterday Saints in more than a generation.

A great book, the only problem with it is that I have not seen my copy for 2 months because people keep on borrowing it !!!

Grace and Peace

Bro. Edmondson

Link to comment

If you don't already have it, I highly recommend the New Oxford Annotated Bible with Apocrypha. The margin commentary is fantastic and it notes lots of translational, historical and mythological issues (to the extent of including relevant parallel Ugaritic texts). Since I travel a lot and there is no way to drag my Anchor Bible Dictionary along, the New Oxford Annotated Bible is a godsend.

Link to comment

Hi gtaggart!

Well, since you asked for MUST HAVES books, the two sets I have are absolutely, fundamentaly, singularly, and impressively NEEDED in everyone's library who decides to try and take the New Testament seriously for understanding. They are, the ten volume work of Kittel, editor, and translated by Bromiley, Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, and the other set I just recently acquired and am fiding incredibly fascinating and very, VERY well done is the 3 volume set, Theological Lexicon of the New Testament, by Ceslas Spicq, translated, edited from the French by James D. Ernest.

The nifty thing is, Spicq's materials do overlap somewhat with Kittel's, but he also used over half his Lexicon on words that Kittel's works did not substantially deal with........ and it is an incredibly valuable and interesting overlap! All the entries are in Greek, then they are transliterated, translated, and then analyzed, in very good and wonderful detail! Spicq's materials are from 1994, Hendrickson Publishers. And Kittel's materials are from reprints in the 1980's and 90's, from original written materials in the 1960's, updated, expanded, and detailed, fleshed out very nicely. It almost makes me wanna keep studyin Greek, ya know? :P

Link to comment
Hi gtaggart!

Well, since you asked for MUST HAVES books, the two sets I have are absolutely, fundamentaly, singularly, and impressively NEEDED in everyone's library who decides to try and take the New Testament seriously for understanding. They are, the ten volume work of Kittel, editor, and translated by Bromiley, Theological Dictionary of the New Testament, and the other set I just recently acquired and am fiding incredibly fascinating and very, VERY well done is the 3 volume set, Theological Lexicon of the New Testament, by Ceslas Spicq, translated, edited from the French by James D. Ernest.

The nifty thing is, Spicq's materials do overlap somewhat with Kittel's, but he also used over half his Lexicon on words that Kittel's works did not substantially deal with........ and it is an incredibly valuable and interesting overlap! All the entries are in Greek, then they are transliterated, translated, and then analyzed, in very good and wonderful detail! Spicq's materials are from 1994, Hendrickson Publishers. And Kittel's materials are from reprints in the 1980's and 90's, from original written materials in the 1960's, updated, expanded, and detailed, fleshed out very nicely. It almost makes me wanna keep studyin Greek, ya know? :P

Well, I'm on the right track, it seems. I was able to get the above two as a package with Logos Software. Lots and lots of commentary. For the cheap, and I mean free cheap, I like something called BiblePro which can be found here.... http://bibleocean.com/

Link to comment

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...