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O. C. Tanner


LifeOnaPlate

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I recently bought a few copies of this Sunday School manual David O. McKay comissioned O.C. Tanner to write. It is really cool; such lesson topics as "Tolerance," "Worship," "Adventure," etc. It has quotes from world leaders from many religions, general authorities, scriptures, poetry, etc.

Anyway, a poster on the board linked to a site about Grant Palmer; how he shouldn't have been disfellowshipped. The site referred to other members of the Church who, allegedly like Palmer, didn't fully subscribe to the founding events of the Church. The site listed O.C. Tanner as one of them. A google search availed nothing, other than, of course, jewlery stuff, mostly. Does anyone have anymore information on O.C. Tanner?

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There was a Common Consent blog about a year ago that listed the "Top 10" lesson manuals. In the comments I recall someone asking whether Tanner left the church. The reply was something enigmatic along the lines of "It's not so much that he left the church. It's more-so that the church left him."

I think the blog also called him a "less active Lowell Bennion."

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I just finished his biography a few weeks ago and although it doesn't end by saying "I am a TBM", it doesn't seem at all like he was disaffected or less active. If I were to guess he was Less active than Henry Erying (the scientist) and more active than Sterling McMurrin :P

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The BCC post is where I saw the manual listed, so I went ahead and tracked one down. It's really interesting. I wonder what the story is behind OC. Also, what was the story behind Lowell?

If I recall correctly, Tanner was more of a cultural Mormon. I think he struggled with the foundational stories of the Church, but I also don't think he preached against them. You can get a good sense of the man here.

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I believe Tanner was part of a discussion group that a jokingly called itself "The Swearing Elders."

Poll, Richard. "The Swearing Elders: Some Reflections." Sunstone 10, no. 9 [1986]

Blakely, Thomas A. "The Swearing Elders: The First Generation of Modern Mormon Intellectuals." Sunstone 10, no. 9

There's also the perspective somewhere in the Hugh Nibley biography about his experience with them.

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I believe Tanner was part of a discussion group that a jokingly called itself "The Swearing Elders."

Poll, Richard. "The Swearing Elders: Some Reflections." Sunstone 10, no. 9 [1986]

Blakely, Thomas A. "The Swearing Elders: The First Generation of Modern Mormon Intellectuals." Sunstone 10, no. 9

There's also the perspective somewhere in the Hugh Nibley biography about his experience with them.

Interesting. Do you recall anything about Nibley's experience? His bio is on my list. Have yet to get it, though.

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The "Swearing Elders" was a nickname for the group. Just finished Leonard Arrington's biography and he mentioned the real name and now it has escaped me. He lectured up at the U a couple of times at the request of McMurrin. THere is also a pretty good treatment of the group in David O. McKay's most recent biography from U of U Press.

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I recently bought a few copies of this Sunday School manual David O. McKay comissioned O.C. Tanner to write. It is really cool; such lesson topics as "Tolerance," "Worship," "Adventure," etc. It has quotes from world leaders from many religions, general authorities, scriptures, poetry, etc.

Anyway, a poster on the board linked to a site about Grant Palmer; how he shouldn't have been disfellowshipped. The site referred to other members of the Church who, allegedly like Palmer, didn't fully subscribe to the founding events of the Church. The site listed O.C. Tanner as one of them. A google search availed nothing, other than, of course, jewlery stuff, mostly. Does anyone have anymore information on O.C. Tanner?

Take a look at this link: http://www.media.utah.edu/UHE/t/TANNER,OBERT.html

He wrote an autobiography. Or at least I read it several years ago and I recall a first person narrative. It's called "One Man's Journey", I think. One of my recollections of it is that he was not a big fan of polygamy. His mother, Annie Clark Tanner, was a plural wife. He grew up under the principle and felt that his mother and her "branch" of the family were neglected and otherwise not so well treated by the father.

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