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Alternate Readings Of 1 Ne. 13: 12


Joshu

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In church last Sunday we were discussing patriotism when 1 Ne. 13: 12 came up in reference to Columbus and how God works in the world but I seem to recall reading an article some time ago that suggested and alternate reading of 1 Ne. 13: 12 in which it is not referring to Columbus at all. But I can't remember where I was reading it. Does anybody what I'm talking about, or have I gone crazy?

Joshu

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I have always suspected this does not refer to Columbus. It is becomming very apparent now that he was not the first European to land in the new world (actually he landed in the West Indies).

I remember visiting Roslin Chapel near Edinburgh, Scotland some years ago and seeing Maize (corn) sculpted into the architecture there. Maize is a plant native to, and initially limited to the Americas. Roslin Chapel pre-dates Columbus.

We also know now that the Vikings founded a colony in North America, as did a Welsh prince by the name of Madoc.

So the passage in the Book of Mormon could be refering to another individual, or to a composite of a number of people who "found" America.

Alan

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I have always suspected this does not refer to Columbus. It is becomming very apparent now that he was not the first European to land in the new world (actually he landed in the West Indies).

I remember visiting Roslin Chapel near Edinburgh, Scotland some years ago and seeing Maize (corn) sculpted into the architecture there. Maize is a plant native to, and initially limited to the Americas. Roslin Chapel pre-dates Columbus.

We also know now that the Vikings founded a colony in North America, as did a Welsh prince by the name of Madoc.

So the passage in the Book of Mormon could be refering to another individual, or to a composite of a number of people who "found" America.

Alan

I liKe the idea that it was a composite. In other words it has meaning at multiple levels and may not have refered to a specific person but rather to the forthcoming invasion of the New world by immigrants from the old world.

The early saints identification with Columbus, in my opinion, was due to the way history and reading was taught in the schools of the day. Besides the Bible, the common text for reading material was called Guffy's Reader. It contained a selection of poetry and other stories that were thought to be useful in teaching reading of current literature. Among its poetry was a poem based on Washington Irving's Biography of Columbus which attributed the discovery of America to Columbus.

One of the major political doctrines of the day was that of "Manifest Destiny". This doctrine and the common belief that Columbus discovered America were probably the basis for identifying Columbus with this prophecy by the early saints.

Larry P

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