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Parable Of The Unjust Steward


consiglieri

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On March 19, 2007, asbestosman posted the following. Yesterday, I had an insight into this passage in doing Sunday school class prep which I wanted to share:

(Luke 16)

1 And he said also unto his disciples, There was a certain rich man, which had a steward; and the same was accused unto him that he had wasted his goods.

2 And he called him, and said unto him, How is it that I hear this of thee? give an account of thy stewardship; for thou mayest be no longer steward.

3 Then the steward said within himself, What shall I do? for my lord taketh away from me the stewardship: I cannot dig; to beg I am ashamed.

4 I am resolved what to do, that, when I am put out of the stewardship, they may receive me into their houses.

5 So he called every one of his lordâ??s debtors unto him, and said unto the first, How much owest thou unto my lord?

6 And he said, An hundred measures of oil. And he said unto him, Take thy bill, and sit down quickly, and write fifty.

7 Then said he to another, And how much owest thou? And he said, An hundred measures of wheat. And he said unto him, Take thy bill, and write fourscore.

8 And the lord commended the unjust steward, because he had done wisely: for the children of this world are in their generation wiser than the children of light.

9 And I say unto you, Make to yourselves friends of the mammon of unrighteousness; that, when ye fail, they may receive you into everlasting habitations.

What do you think this means?--question by asbestosman

_____________________________________________

I posted on this thread previously, but was unable to come up with anything substantive. It is a difficult parable which you don't hear very much because it is so . . . difficult.

It came to me last night as I was reading it in preparation for Sunday school next week that the key is when Jesus say that the "children of this world are in their generation wiser than the children of light."

What is it that the unjust steward did that was wise? Well, he knew he was going to get terminated from his job, and so he spent the remaining time that he had using the money he had in his control to make things better for other people.

I think that, similarly, we are all stewards of the money, etc., that is in our possession. It is not really ours, but is committed to us by God who gives it to us to see what we will do with it. In this way, we are the stewards and God is the "rich man"--the source of all riches.

In the same way, we all face death, which may be seen in the parable as "termination from employment." It is perhaps noteworthy that even after the rich man decides to terminate the steward, the steward inexplicably has time left in which to make the arrangements with the "debtors" of the rich man.

This may be our period of probation in this life between accepting Jesus and our "termination."

Here, an unjust steward uses the money in his care to make things easier for the rich man's debtors, so he can be received into their houses upon his termination.

I think the point may be that the children of light should be as wise as this, and use the money that God has placed in their care to make things easier for other people, so that when we die, we may be received into the houses that are heavenly in nature.

Just some thoughts on this difficult parable.

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

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On March 19, 2007, asbestosman posted the following. Yesterday, I had an insight into this passage in doing Sunday school class prep which I wanted to share:

What do you think this means?--question by asbestosman

_____________________________________________

I posted on this thread previously, but was unable to come up with anything substantive. It is a difficult parable which you don't hear very much because it is so . . . difficult.

It came to me last night as I was reading it in preparation for Sunday school next week that the key is when Jesus say that the "children of this world are in their generation wiser than the children of light."

What is it that the unjust steward did that was wise? Well, he knew he was going to get terminated from his job, and so he spent the remaining time that he had using the money he had in his control to make things better for other people.

I think that, similarly, we are all stewards of the money, etc., that is in our possession. It is not really ours, but is committed to us by God who gives it to us to see what we will do with it. In this way, we are the stewards and God is the "rich man"--the source of all riches.

In the same way, we all face death, which may be seen in the parable as "termination from employment." It is perhaps noteworthy that even after the rich man decides to terminate the steward, the steward inexplicably has time left in which to make the arrangements with the "debtors" of the rich man.

This may be our period of probation in this life between accepting Jesus and our "termination."

Here, an unjust steward uses the money in his care to make things easier for the rich man's debtors, so he can be received into their houses upon his termination.

I think the point may be that the children of light should be as wise as this, and use the money that God has placed in their care to make things easier for other people, so that when we die, we may be received into the houses that are heavenly in nature.

Just some thoughts on this difficult parable.

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

wow ! thanks, I needed that today :P

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Those are some interesting thoughts. Are you saying that his parable is speaking more against procrastination since we know that our days in our mortal probation are numbered?

I also wonder if perhaps Jesus meant that while the love of money (Mammon of unrighteous) is dangerous, that it is benificial to learn to use it wisely.

Another thought that has been on my mind lately concerns what one should do if one has committed the unpardonable sin. Is it then better to just abandon all hope and instead concentrate on forming alliances in the afterlife among the devils with whom you will dwell in the eternities? What reason would one have to do any good if one has committed the unpardonable sin? Does this parable come into play here?

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Who among us are not unjust stewards? Have we not all "wasted" our probation to some degree? Are we not all more prone to see anothers "debts" rather than our own?

This parable is all about recognizing our own "failures" whereing we have failed God, and doing good with the stewardship God has given us by using it to bless other lives. By being quick to forgive and drop grievances and debts when the person makes an effort be it only a 50% effort to make amends.

I have always liked this parable.

-SlackTime

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Those are some interesting thoughts. Are you saying that his parable is speaking more against procrastination since we know that our days in our mortal probation are numbered?

I also wonder if perhaps Jesus meant that while the love of money (Mammon of unrighteous) is dangerous, that it is benificial to learn to use it wisely.

Another thought that has been on my mind lately concerns what one should do if one has committed the unpardonable sin. Is it then better to just abandon all hope and instead concentrate on forming alliances in the afterlife among the devils with whom you will dwell in the eternities? What reason would one have to do any good if one has committed the unpardonable sin? Does this parable come into play here?

It is an intersting question you raise about the unpardonable sin. I do not know. My take on it has always been that if somebody gets to that point, they really aren't interested in repentance anymore anyway.

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

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On March 19, 2007, asbestosman posted the following. Yesterday, I had an insight into this passage in doing Sunday school class prep which I wanted to share:

What do you think this means?--question by asbestosman

_____________________________________________

I posted on this thread previously, but was unable to come up with anything substantive. It is a difficult parable which you don't hear very much because it is so . . . difficult.

It came to me last night as I was reading it in preparation for Sunday school next week that the key is when Jesus say that the "children of this world are in their generation wiser than the children of light."

What is it that the unjust steward did that was wise? Well, he knew he was going to get terminated from his job, and so he spent the remaining time that he had using the money he had in his control to make things better for other people.

I think that, similarly, we are all stewards of the money, etc., that is in our possession. It is not really ours, but is committed to us by God who gives it to us to see what we will do with it. In this way, we are the stewards and God is the "rich man"--the source of all riches.

In the same way, we all face death, which may be seen in the parable as "termination from employment." It is perhaps noteworthy that even after the rich man decides to terminate the steward, the steward inexplicably has time left in which to make the arrangements with the "debtors" of the rich man.

This may be our period of probation in this life between accepting Jesus and our "termination."

Here, an unjust steward uses the money in his care to make things easier for the rich man's debtors, so he can be received into their houses upon his termination.

I think the point may be that the children of light should be as wise as this, and use the money that God has placed in their care to make things easier for other people, so that when we die, we may be received into the houses that are heavenly in nature.

Just some thoughts on this difficult parable.

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

I do not find a positive within the parable other than the lesson to be learned from poor behavior. The parable was directed to the Pharisees and they knew it. see Luke 16:14

Lets break down Luke 16 1-9 as listed. by Consig

1. The rich man (Jesus) calls his steward (the Pharisees and/or scribes.) They have been given much and have done nothing good. wasting his goods.

2. Jesus calls the steward and questions how, and then says you will be fired.

3. The steward (Pharisees) says to himself "self I cannot dig to beg, it is below me, my pride will not allow it what can I do?"

4-7. The pharisees (Steward) has a plan they/he will make friends with the people that owe the rich man money/goods before word of his authority being cancelled reaches their ears. "I will settle their debts @ a fraction of the cost and then I will be welcome in their homes as a friend and saviour, yes this will work." (Insert evil laughter here) (Or fingers tapping together while saying excellent under breath) He then proceeds to act out his evil plan.

8. Now the Lord (rich man) commends the steward (pharisees) and states that he had been "wise" using his (The Lords) resources quickly before running out of "authority" to do so. He then goes on to say that the children of this world are in their generation wiser than the children of light. Basically worldly men are better at taking care of themselves and their needs now, than are "children of light" (Believers). Or Non believers understand well how to take care of their own wordly needs. The commendation is that, it is a good plan and it worked. But it is never condoned, in fact it seems to be infered by marking time ("in their generation") that it will be short lived success.

9. First a definition, Mammon: a word used in the Bible to describe riches,avarice,and wordly gain. It is personified as a false god in the New Testemant. Often, Mammon is regarded as material wealth and thought to have an evil influence. (Wikipedia) It seems here he is saying that it's a great plan, make nice with false gods and evil behavior, so when you fail, you can hang with them in.... well where do you think these people will be? And not just for a time but FOREVER! (I sense a bit of sarcasm here)

As with parables we can insert ourselves as anyone within the story and get different meanings, another reason why I believe Christ taught in such ways. I feel that both Consig and Slack time have good ideas as well, this is only my opinion, I place it before you.

Regards,

Sentinus

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I guess I have a different take on this than others... anyway, forgive me if my ideas are not clearly drawn out as I am making a quick "drive-by" post.

(Luke 16)

1 And he said also unto his disciples, There was a certain rich man, which had a steward; and the same was accused unto him that he had wasted his goods.

I believe that the rich man is the Lord, and the unjust steward is each of us (more specifically any follower of Christ). The Lord is reprimanding us for being given much (the Gospel, talent) and wasting our lives by neglecting to share them in any meaningful way. In other words by testifying of Jesus Christ and bringing people unto Him.

2 And he called him, and said unto him, How is it that I hear this of thee? give an account of thy stewardship; for thou mayest be no longer steward.

He then calls the steward to repent or he may no longer be counted among his flock. We will lose our discipleship.

3 Then the steward said within himself, What shall I do? for my lord taketh away from me the stewardship: I cannot dig; to beg I am ashamed.

The steward then realizes he has nothing to offer; nothing of value that will be acceptable in the next life. For without engaging in the Atonement of Jesus Christ we are all merely beggars. He repents.

4 I am resolved what to do, that, when I am put out of the stewardship, they may receive me into their houses.

5 So he called every one of his lordâ??s debtors unto him, and said unto the first, How much owest thou unto my lord?

6 And he said, An hundred measures of oil. And he said unto him, Take thy bill, and sit down quickly, and write fifty.

7 Then said he to another, And how much owest thou? And he said, An hundred measures of wheat. And he said unto him, Take thy bill, and write fourscore.

In these verses the steward resolves to testify of Jesus Christ and to settle the debts of the debtors. How? By bringing them unto Christ. Who are the debtors? Everyone is, and so the steward settles the debt they owe to the rich man (Christ) by bringing them unto Him so that they may engage the redemptive power of Atonement more completely within their lives. If you notice the steward does not resolve ANY debts owed to him, but rather resolves the debts owed to his master-- Jesus Christ.

8 And the lord commended the unjust steward, because he had done wisely: for the children of this world are in their generation wiser than the children of light.

9 And I say unto you, Make to yourselves friends of the mammon of unrighteousness; that, when ye fail, they may receive you into everlasting habitations.

In the â??realâ? world this steward would be scorned, most likely sued and imprisoned for absolving so much of his employerâ??s debts without full payment or, it appears, without direction. Instead he is commended. In the â??spiritualâ? world we know that the debts can never be repaid so each is asked to pay what they can and to repent by walking in the light of the Lord. The light which is charity (the Pure Love of Christ) and long suffering. By doing so, we will be blessed in the houses of those who we have served.

At least that is how I read it.

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That was awesome, Sentinus!

You just got honorable mention during my Sunday school class!

Do you want credit?

A royalty, perhaps?

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

Nah, keep your Mammon, I would however like to be with the Children of light in the next generation.

Thanks I hope you were being serious, as I took your response as a comliment.

Regards,

Sentinus

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Nah, keep your Mammon, I would however like to be with the Children of light in the next generation.

Thanks I hope you were being serious, as I took your response as a comliment.

Regards,

Sentinus

I was being serious, man!

Please accept my comliments.

It is also interesting how Luke uses the unusual phrase, "children of light" here, which is suggestive of the DSS Battle Scroll depicting the warfare between the "sons of darkness" and the "sons of light."

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

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I was being serious, man!

Please accept my comliments.

It is also interesting how Luke uses the unusual phrase, "children of light" here, which is suggestive of the DSS Battle Scroll depicting the warfare between the "sons of darkness" and the "sons of light."

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

Thanks man. When I used to teach GP I loved breaking down the scriptures and taking a "modern" approach it always made things fun. I agree the sons of light/darkness is an interesting choice of words.

Regards,

Sentinus

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