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A Hebrew Word Play From Mosiah 28


Magyar

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V. 3: "Now they [the sons of Mosiah] were desirous that salvation be declared to every creature ... the very thought that any soul should perish ... did cause them to quake and tremble.

V. 4: And thus did the Spirit of the Lord work upon them, for they were the very vilest of sinners."

The second clause of verse 4 struck me as an odd juxtaposition, since it doesn't appear, at least to me, to have any causal relationship to the rest of the passages.

I examined the term "vilest" or "vile." It's a perfectly good Biblical term, albeit somewhat rare in the text.

But boy did I get a shock when I opened up Strong's Concordance, which lists it as Number 2149, for those of you with access to the book. The Hebrew word zulluwth, translated in English as vilest, derives, oddly enough, from a root specifically associated with shaking or quaking, as in the wind of a tempest.

The beni Mosiah once were "zulluwth." Now they quake and tremble at the thought of others perishing. See the word play?

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Sigh. I thought it was interesting. I'll give it one forlorn little bump and then let it slowly sift down into oblivion.

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Here is what I found on the online Strong's Concordance.

I searched for "vile" and came up with the word "qalal," which is number 2028. (I tried number 2149, and came up with "broad.")

I think you are onto something!

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

Pronunciation Guide

qalal {kaw-lal'}

TWOT Reference Root Word

TWOT - 2028 a primitive root

Part of Speech

v

Outline of Biblical Usage

1) to be slight, be swift, be trifling, be of little account, be light

a) (Qal)

1) to be slight, be abated (of water)

2) to be swift

3) to be trifling, be of little account

cool.gif (Niphal)

1) to be swift, show oneself swift

2) to appear trifling, be too trifling, be insignificant

3) to be lightly esteemed

c) (Piel)

1) to make despicable

2) to curse

d) (Pual) to be cursed

e) (Hiphil)

1) to make light, lighten

2) to treat with contempt, bring contempt or dishonour

f) (Pilpel)

1) to shake

2) to whet

g) (Hithpalpel) to shake oneself, be moved to and fro

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Magyar... your posting (according to the time listed for your first post...) at 5:53 A.M. No one is going to see your post for several hours (yawn) yet... :P

I thought it was interesting... thank you...

The Garden Girl

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Ah, we're global! It's always daytime somewhere on this board. It certainly wasn't 5 a.m. when I posted here on the East Coast.

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Here is what I found on the online Strong's Concordance.

I searched for "vile" and came up with the word "qalal," which is number 2028. (I tried number 2149, and came up with "broad.")

I think you are onto something!

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

Odd that your version had "qalal" and a different Strong's number. Maybe mine is from an older version -- it's an old printed copy that was an absolute steal from a used book sale. I'll doublecheck when I get home tonight.

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Brilliant!

The term â??vilestâ? appears one time in the KJV: â??The wicked walk on every side, when the vilest men are exaltedâ? (Ps 12:8 ).

This is the Hebrew word zullut. It derives from the root zll which carries two distinct meanings. This is because the Hebrew root reflects two separate Semitic roots as witnessed in Arabic dalla â??to be mean,â? and Arabic zalzala â??to cause to shake.â?

Hebrew combines both the d and the z as a single phoneme. Hence, the Hebrew root zll means both â??to despiseâ? or â??to treat lightlyâ? (i.e., â??vilestâ?), and â??quakeâ? as in the mountains quake or tremble (see Ju 5:5; Isa 63:19/64:2).

If translated into Hebrew, these Book of Mormon verses would indeed contain a beautiful biblical-like word play.

This is really quite exciting. Thanks so much for sharing.

You should put this together for a FARMS Update.

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Brilliant!

Would you like to join consiglieri's and my club of cavernous evil. Pretty much we just change people's names when we quote them, and then tell each other that we're "Brilliant!"

Magyar,

I'm amazed... really. How in the world did you ever even think to make the connection and hit up the "Hebrew"?

Really cool dude. In fact, Brilliant!

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I want to join! Actually, I am more cheerleader. You guys that come up with these things amaze me. Pretty smart of Joseph Smith to throw those kinds of things in to hoodwink us, don't you think?

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I'm far from daring to volunteer for the FARMS list. I'm an absolute amateur when it comes to apologetics. I wish I could claim genius on this one, but I can't. It was an absolute surprise discovery for me. I've been making it a habit as I creep word by word through the Book of Mormon, to examine and ponder each one (other than basic fillers like "and"). I examine it for commonality or rarity in both the BOM and the Bible; for the possibility of it joining another word as a phrase specifically appearing in the Bible; and for its Hebrew equivalent. So I did with "vilest," in this instance. It's a great word, in a dark sort of way.

Brilliant!

The term â??vilestâ? appears one time in the KJV: â??The wicked walk on every side, when the vilest men are exaltedâ? (Ps 12:8 ).

This is the Hebrew word zullut. It derives from the root zll which carries two distinct meanings. This is because the Hebrew root reflects two separate Semitic roots as witnessed in Arabic dalla â??to be mean,â? and Arabic zalzala â??to cause to shake.â?

Hebrew combines both the d and the z as a single phoneme. Hence, the Hebrew root zll means both â??to despiseâ? or â??to treat lightlyâ? (i.e., â??vilestâ?), and â??quakeâ? as in the mountains quake or tremble (see Ju 5:5; Isa 63:19/64:2).

If translated into Hebrew, these Book of Mormon verses would indeed contain a beautiful biblical-like word play.

This is really quite exciting. Thanks so much for sharing.

You should put this together for a FARMS Update.

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I'm far from daring to volunteer for the FARMS list. I'm an absolute amateur when it comes to apologetics. I wish I could claim genius on this one, but I can't. It was an absolute surprise discovery for me. I've been making it a habit as I creep word by word through the Book of Mormon, to examine and ponder each one (other than basic fillers like "and"). I examine it for commonality or rarity in both the BOM and the Bible; for the possibility of it joining another word as a phrase specifically appearing in the Bible; and for its Hebrew equivalent. So I did with "vilest," in this instance. It's a great word, in a dark sort of way.

You underestimate yourself.

Geniuses are those most often surprised by the fruits of their research.

But this is something that really should be made available to a wider audience and I hope that David will take care of spreading the good word!

For myself, I have printed off this thread and am going to be making some notes in the margins of my Book of Mormon this evening.

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

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You underestimate yourself.

Geniuses are those most often surprised by the fruits of their research.

But this is something that really should be made available to a wider audience and I hope that David will take care of spreading the good word!

For myself, I have printed off this thread and am going to be making some notes in the margins of my Book of Mormon this evening.

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

Wow. Here I thought this thread was just going to sink away like a stone plunked into a pond. Or perhaps incite savage ridicule from some critic.

What a nice way to end a Wednesday. Thanks, y'all!

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