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toon

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About toon

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  1. Thus my comment about the phrasing being odd. I recognized the exact same thing you did, but I also suspected that he wasn't directing or commanding his adult children in any way. Rather, I suspected it was more likely in the same light as when my father-in-law sends out a message telling his kids that they need to do x, y, and z to remain worthy and to go to the temple. I also remember a time years ago when I was going through some financial difficulties, and my dad helped me out. After, it came up that I was paying tithing, and he told me I shouldn't. (My dad's not Mormon.) While he didn't phrase it as just advice or a recommendation, I recognized that was what it was, because ... people skills.
  2. I thought his phrasing about "instructing" his adult children to do something was odd. At the same time, my father-in-law sends out regular messages advising and reminding ("instructing" would also work) his adult children on various matters such as temple attendance, food storage, family prayer, and sometimes politics. Even though I don't agree with him on many of these messages, I've always appreciated them, as they show his concern for his kids. Should I instead tell him to mind his own business?
  3. I don't think the proposed regulation even prohibits conversion therapy. It just prohibits a health professional (therapist) licensed by the state from engaging in the practice. There are all kinds of scientifically unsound practices that health professionals are prohibited from engaging in, by virtue of their license. As much as a patient might choose bloodletting as a treatment to help cure some disease, a doctor's license would likely be in jeopardy if she or he indulged that patient's choice. I don't see this as about choice. Rather, it's about what the state will allow licensed individuals to do and not due under the auspices of that license.
  4. CFR has been met by Sunstoned above. The FAIR statement you posted is a laughable dodge.
  5. What's their definition of "longstanding?" How long has it been since the Church recommended , or in some cases required, such practices? If this is purely an academic response to concerns about religious freedoms, why can't the church state, along with its opposition to the current language, that a member who administers such therapies cannot be in good standing? Something along the lines of, "We oppose these practices and therapies, but we cannot support a legislative ban for the following reasons ________________________. Nevertheless, any member who recommends or engages in such therapies is acting in opposition to Church counsel."
  6. But isn't this more a matter of what licensed therapists are allowed to do under the auspices of their license? How is such a prohibition here different than prohibiting a psychiatrist from administering psicolocybin or MDMA therapy for someone suffering from depression or PTSD? While there may be some extremely positive research and developments behind the therapies, .they're still prohibited outside of an approved clinical trial. if you're not part of such an approved trial program, a psychiatrist risks his or her license by moving forward with such treatment. Move back the clock ten years, and it's the same with doctor's writing writing prescriptions (aka recommendations) for medicinal marijuana. The number of doctors willing to write such recommendations was severely limited by the threat to their licenses. In fact, the only doctors willing to do so during this time were those who had effectively given up their medical practices in favor of writing marijuana prescriptions. The point being that having a license means that you're somewhat restricted in what you can do with that license, and to a large extent, what is and isn't allowed with be dependent on the scientific consensus. How is a therapist engaging in conversion therapy a religious issue, when administering magic mushrooms isn't?
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