Jump to content

Rajah Manchou

Members
  • Content Count

    1,701
  • Joined

Community Reputation

1,305 Excellent

1 Follower

About Rajah Manchou

  • Rank
    Separates Water & Dry Land

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male

Recent Profile Visitors

4,272 profile views
  1. Nothing specific. I'm just curious about all the new papers coming out challenging the long-held view that the Americas were completely empty until a small group crossed over and were sealed off some from the rest of the world for 13000 years. Two years ago, that was the dominant hypothesis. Now we know that there were humans there 25,000 years ago, there were multiple migrations back and forth across the Bering Strait and also contact with the Pacific Islands before Columbus. America was not exactly a "New World".
  2. True, but you share a common culture with those app developers. What this is saying is that two groups of creatures who never shared anything with each other spontaneously came up with the same app. Fluted points have been one of those apps that anthropologists have touted as unique to the Americas. Given the time frames, I feel that it is more likely that prehistoric human beings were far more mobile than we allow and the idea for this particular app was shared. The more recent papers on pre-Clovis American ghost populations support this argument. https://www.mormondialogue.org/topic/73000-no-longer-speculation-native-americans-mixed-with-polynesians/page/2/?tab=comments#comment-1209985081
  3. I've got no horse in the "which century?" race, but we discussed this a while back. I'm still not certain that the Arminianism in the Book of Mormon didn't come from Nathanael Emmons, Oliver's great uncle, who was a friend of Ethan Smith and also one of the leading figures in the New Divinity movement that swept New England in the decades previous to the Book of Mormon. Dr. John Smith, a cousin of Asael Smith was also an Arminian and taught both Ethan Smith and Solomon Spaulding at Dartmouth. Curiously, a narrative about a golden book containing the spiritual history of "lost Israelites" also pops up in a small village in Burma, one year before the Book of Mormon was published. The American missionaries who first told of this account in 1829 were Baptists out of the New Divinity, Hopkinsian movements. They were self-proclaimed followers of Nathanael Emmons, Oliver Cowdery's great uncle. This says to me that the Dartmouth Arminianism in the late 18th century was the most probable source of the Book of Mormon narrative. Although the toponyms and geography come from 16th and 17th century Utopian texts about Rechabites (Rahmans as they were known) in the isles of the sea.
  4. Yet another thing that just isn’t possible, so it must not be cultural sharing: https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2020/08/200805160938.htm
  5. Following the new papers pushing the populating of the Americas back to 25,000 BP, Razib Khan is now proposing that an Andaman-like group was the first to the Americas. "I believe these new results likely open the possibility for a resolution of the mystery of why some groups in the Amazon seem to have “Australasian” genetic affinities. The result is robust. But it was hard to resolve with the Beringian standstill. The new chronology offers up an opportunity. Clearly the earlier populations before 20,000 years ago may have been the ancestors of the “Australasians” that are still hinted at in the Amazonians. I believe that these early people were members of what I have termed Clade-2 East Eurasians. This clade was dominant in South, Southeast Asia, Tibet, and present in coastal East Asia (Japan), during the Pleistocene. It has closer affinities to Oceanians than East Asians to the north." https://www.gnxp.com/WordPress/2020/07/23/how-the-amazonians-got-their-australasian
  6. Yes, I've seen them. Some with my own eyes. There are long-standing conventions protecting cultural and religious heritage sites. I'm absolutely in favor of these. Let's not be quiet as a church mouse when these conventions are put at risk.
  7. I went through most of the cases mentioned above and the majority (including the arson in Nantes) were committed by disgruntled church members, or members of other religions/cults. This looks more like an uptick in religious extremism, mental disease and racism. Not 'hostility towards religion of any kind'.
  8. Which militia types? The ones taking selfies on top of the overturned SLC police car or the ones marching down the street with BLM? You seem to think there is only one well-regulated right wing militia and they all march in step with what you think is just. But their own Twitter feeds show that most right wing anti government militias in the streets right now are just as anxious for a confrontation as the mobs. Just look at the pics in the article. They are part of the same mob, and they state they are there to defend the protestors.
  9. Thats also what I thought, but some seem to think that there is a leftist mob and that these armed civilian militia types showing up and walking around within the mob are not part of that mob. I disagree, a mob is a mob regardless of who you voted for.
  10. The "mob" in Carthage was actually a few citizen militias banding together. Those charged with Smith's murder were the leaders of the militias that carried it out. They were acquitted because the Mormons were scared to testify against the local militias.
  11. Our local story has gone international. This was #3 on my Apple News feed today: The birth of a militia: how an armed group polices Black Lives Matter protests
  12. Donald Trump became POTUS in January, 2017. The words "Donald J. Trump is calling for a total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States until our country's representatives can figure out what is going on" were on donaldjtrump.com until the press complained loud enough. The Muslim Ban wording was removed on May 7, 2017, five months after POTUS was sworn in. Besides, when Justice Roberts asked if Trump might immunize his executive orders from constitutional challenge by disavowing his earlier statements about a Muslim ban, Trump responded by saying "there’s nothing to apologize for."
×
×
  • Create New...