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caspianrex

The Old Testament Canon

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This morning I discovered this article about the Old Testament canon, written from the perspective of the Stone-Campbell restorationist movement. This movement arose alongside the early Latter-day Saint movement, so I thought it might be interesting to some folks on this forum. There seems to be a fairly wide spectrum of understanding among Latter-day Saints and other Christian sects, regarding canonicity. Even though the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints uses the King James Bible, I find it interesting that the LDS edition of the KJV has a note on The Song of Solomon, that the Joseph Smith Translation did not recognize that book as "inspired writings." So I would be interested to hear thoughts on the article I've shared.

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14 hours ago, caspianrex said:

This morning I discovered this article about the Old Testament canon, written from the perspective of the Stone-Campbell restorationist movement. This movement arose alongside the early Latter-day Saint movement, so I thought it might be interesting to some folks on this forum. There seems to be a fairly wide spectrum of understanding among Latter-day Saints and other Christian sects, regarding canonicity. Even though the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints uses the King James Bible, I find it interesting that the LDS edition of the KJV has a note on The Song of Solomon, that the Joseph Smith Translation did not recognize that book as "inspired writings." So I would be interested to hear thoughts on the article I've shared.

Prof Heard's piece is very interesting and I enjoyed reading it.  Thanks for that.

He appears unaware of the true antiquity of the codex format, although he was speaking mostly about late biblical compilations.  See my Quora answer on the antiquity of codices online at  https://www.quora.com/What-is-the-oldest-archaeological-evidence-of-scripture-in-the-form-of-a-bound-book-as-we-recognise-it-today-as-opposed-to-a-scroll/answer/Bob-Smith-3106 .

He supposes (with many) that the Hebrew and Christian canons are late, although David Noel Freedman argued that the Hebrew Canon was set already in the Persian period (Daniel being added later as a 23rd book).  Freedman's argument was based on the deliberate symmetry of that canon:  Freedman, "The Undiscovered Symmetry of the Bible," Bible Review, 10/1 (Feb 1994):34-41;  Freedman, The Unity of the Hebrew Bible (Univ of Michigan, 1991).

Moreover, the Book of Enoch was not only considered canonical in late Judaism and early Christianity, it continued in the Jewish and Christian Canon in Ethiopia to the present day.  James Charlesworth has a good discussion of canon in his introductory remarks to his two-volume edition of the Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha of the OT.

His comments on II Macc 12 are interesting as well, especially since they play a direct role in Paul's words in I Cor 15:29 (deliberate according to James Barr).  Especially important from a Restorationist POV.

 

 

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