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Secularization Hits the Mormons

At least 40% of those in my own family and other active families I know who were raised in the LDS faith have left the church.  

89 members have voted

  1. 1. At least 40% of those in my own family and other active families I know who were raised in the LDS faith have left the church.

    • True
      28
    • False
      61
  2. 2. I believe God is a real “exalted person of bone and flesh"

    • True
      65
    • False
      24
  3. 3. I believe that Jesus was literally resurrected.

    • True
      71
    • False
      18


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Posted (edited)

Just wondering what people think of the numbers quoted in this article:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/intl/blog/the-secular-life/201905/secularization-hits-the-mormons?fbclid=IwAR1uMhhS5pT5J_P9P70mDSLxZR_0pN2ChamyyA2lpXCVUsG16sNd_mnAl1w

Also, is there room for secular agnostic participants within Mormonism, and if so, to what degree would such members be allowed to contribute?  (What church callings, etc. would they be allowed to hold)

Non-literal secular participants - this is what it is turning into for a lot of people:  American churches must reject literalism and admit we got it wrong on gay people

What do people here take literally, and what not?  The flood?  the creation?  How many here believe J.S. was a prophet vs. not?  

*  Mormon retention rates are dropping: In 2007, 70% of those raised in the LDS church were still in it as adults, but in 2014, only 64% were -- and among Millennials, it was down to 62%. According to Riess, such apostasy rates are gaining momentum, so that soon “as many as half of Millennials who were raised Mormon may be leaving the faith.”

* Mormon faith is weakening: 86% of older Mormons know that “God is real,” but only 68% of Millennial Mormons share such a conviction; 83% of older Mormons confidently know that Jesus was literally resurrected, but only 57% of Millennial Mormons hold this belief; 61% of older Mormons firmly believe that God created Adam and Eve sometime in the last 10,000 years, but only 47% of Millennial Mormons share this belief.

* Belief in specific Mormon teachings is in decline: 67% of older Mormons believe that Joseph Smith was a prophet of God, but only 51% of Millennial Mormons believe so; 68% of older Mormons believe that God is an “exalted person of bone and flesh,” but only 55% of Millennial Mormons hold that belief; 62% of older Mormons believe that the Book of Mormon is a literal, historical account, but only 50% of Millennial Mormons do.

Confidence in religion is down: Whereas 92% of older Mormons think religious organizations are a force for good, 62% of younger Mormons think so.

Edited by changed
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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, Amulek said:

Whenever I see these kinds of numbers (i.e., X% of older members think P but only some-number-less-than-X% of younger members think P) I usually wonder how they know that the difference between X and X-Y is really because the younger generation doesn't think the same way instead of just being the case that they haven't yet gotten older and more firm in their conviction?

I mean, I would kind of expect more older members to affirm that "God is real" than younger members simply from having lived long enough to have the life experiences to make them sure of that belief.

 

You mean people who don't believe any of the truth claims of the church, but who happen to like hanging out with people who do hold those beliefs - who are the kind of people they are in no small part because of those beliefs? Sure. Everyone is welcome. Hopefully, those people will eventually put two and two together though and become converted.

 

 

Yes - it would be interesting if previous studies had been done to see if the beliefs of that age group are consistent with time.  What age group are you in?  and did you not believe God was real when you were younger?

It is not about "hanging out" - it is about being a good family member.  walk a mile in another's shoes - let's say your family happens to be ____(fill in the blank - Catholic, Jewish, Muslim, atheist, etc.)____ something that you are not.  In order to be a part of your parents/spouse's/children's lives, would you be willing to attend services and activities with them to support them?  Haven't you ever attended the religious or otherwise service/activities of different faiths to support friends?  (or are all your friends Mormon?)

 

I hang out with many people from many different belief systems - I agree, they are all wonderful people.  Some wonderful Catholics, some wonderful Muslims, some wonderful Jews - and yes, all of their various religious communities have taught them many beautiful things.... does not mean I need to convert to any of those religious beliefs.  

 

I have attended Shabbot services, have eaten Ramadan feasts, have enjoyed Catholic services, and hippie gatherings outside in the woods.... and a few LDS services as well....  all wonderful experiences with amazing people.  I do not hold one group to be better than any other.  The eyes and ears of the beholder - some listen with a literal ear, while others listen to words as they are parables, symbolic, non-literal - humanist poems for contemplation.  

 

What other religious services have you participated in, how welcomed did you feel?  What did you learn?  

 

Edited by changed

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I've lived in 5 different states, been a member of branches and wards in all of them, and I only know two people who have left the church.  Some might have left without me knowing of course, but out of the few hundred that I'm friends with or am in a position to know whether or not they are participating in church, it's just two.

 

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About 60% of my siblings have left the church, although most of them seem to have retained some kind of notion about spirituality or God.

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All six of my siblings are still active in adulthood. I have seen some people leave but in my area it is not those kinds of numbers. Most of the less actives in my ward either do not have children or they were never blessed or baptized.

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21 minutes ago, bluebell said:

I've lived in 5 different states, been a member of branches and wards in all of them, and I only know two people who have left the church.  Some might have left without me knowing of course, but out of the few hundred that I'm friends with or am in a position to know whether or not they are participating in church, it's just two.

 

and... what is the percentage of inactive members in your congregations?

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48 minutes ago, changed said:

and hippie gatherings outside in the woods...

Rainbow gathering?

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17 minutes ago, Gray said:

About 60% of my siblings have left the church, although most of them seem to have retained some kind of notion about spirituality or God.

More than 60% of mine are now out (all brothers served missions and all of us were married in the temple).  Same stats for my husband’s siblings.

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Posted (edited)

Here’s my own immediate family’s anecdotal data. Mom/dad born in the church, descendants of pioneer stock dating to a) pre-1847 on one side and b) the 1850s -1860s Scottish/English conversions on the other.

I have five siblings. All but one of us (83%) have left the church.

Edited by Spammer

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Posted (edited)
11 minutes ago, Spammer said:

Here’s my own immediate family’s anecdotal data. Mom/dad born in the church, descendants of pioneer stock dating to a) pre-1847 on one side and b) the 1850s -1860s Scottish/English conversions on the other.

I have five siblings. All but one of us (83%) have left the church.

I come from a very strong pioneer heritage (on both sides....back to Nauvoo days).  All of my siblings were married in the temple (and served missions except one sister).  My Dad was Bishop, Stake President and Stake Patriarch.  We could not have been raised more "Mormon".

Out of 6 of us (siblings)....I am the only one fully active.   Also most of my nieces and nephews are out of the church now too.

Edited by ALarson

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18 minutes ago, changed said:

and... what is the percentage of inactive members in your congregations?

About 60% but I would guess most fell away before the Millenial generation. If you are in your 40s with no Priesthood or are a Deacon or Teacher it is a pretty fair bet you have not been active since you were a kid and there are a lot of those in my ward.

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40 minutes ago, changed said:

and... what is the percentage of inactive members in your congregations?

I'm not sure.  I'm the YW's president and I can tell you the percentage of young women in the ward that are inactive.  It's around 30% less active (meaning, they almost all--all but three out of 33--come to an activity every few weeks but we don't usually see them on Sundays).

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1 hour ago, changed said:

and... what is the percentage of inactive members in your congregations?

Not aimed at me, but last time I was in the know we had 32-33% activity rate at both the ward and stake level. It's been probably 5-6 years, not sure if it's changed

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While my experience differs from the survey, I don't have an issue with its validity.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, ALarson said:

I come from a very strong pioneer heritage (on both sides....back to Nauvoo days).  All of my siblings were married in the temple (and served missions except one sister).  My Dad was Bishop, Stake President and Stake Patriarch.  We could not have been raised more "Mormon".

Out of 6 of us (siblings)....I am the only one fully active.   Also most of my nieces and nephews are out of the church now too.

We were a Salt Lake Valley family. We all came of age in the mid-80s to late 90s. Dad was a bishop and in the stake presidency growing up. Only two of us served missions and married in the temple. One is still in and one is out (me). The remainder were mentally out in high school and really out soon after they left home. 

Edited by Spammer

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All great-great grandparent sets but one arrived here either from Europe or Nauvoo prior to the railroad.  The son of the non-Mormon great-great grandparent set came with the railroad and married a local girl.  Used to run a bar in Brigham City, which his only son took over upon his death.  His son sold it in, if memory serves, the mid 1960s.

One sibling (of six total) died in infancy; one became or always was a virulent anti-Mormon, who just happens also to be a sociopath.  He scares the 4377 out of me and should you, too. The remaining four are all temple wed and at various degrees of activity in their 60s and 70s.  All of the boys missioned including the sociopath.

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1 hour ago, Gray said:

About 60% of my siblings have left the church, although most of them seem to have retained some kind of notion about spirituality or God.

I think its funny that you use a percentage to discuss your siblings’ membership - AND you use the word “about” 60% as if you’re rounding.

You're either bad at math or have a TON of siblings!

😊

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5 minutes ago, SouthernMo said:

I think its funny that you use a percentage to discuss your siblings’ membership - AND you use the word “about” 60% as if you’re rounding.

You're either bad at math or have a TON of siblings!

😊

Or wants to retain some privacy.

 

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We need an "I dunno" in the poll.  😊  Out of 4 siblings...all were out a inactive except for one.  I have 2 excommunications in cousins and one who had her name removed.  Not sure about a lot of them anymore.

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1 minute ago, mfbukowski said:

Or wants to retain some privacy.

{Whew!} I read that as "piracy" first readthrough.  What a relief!

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Posted (edited)
10 minutes ago, SouthernMo said:

I think its funny that you use a percentage to discuss your siblings’ membership - AND you use the word “about” 60% as if you’re rounding.

You're either bad at math or have a TON of siblings!

😊

Both! My parents were both of the opinion that family planning was for the gentiles.

Edited by Gray

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