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Bill “Papa” Lee

DNA, for some it means, “Do Not Approve”. My question is how does it work?

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I recently posted my DNA results, which are 90% English, 5% Scot Irish, and 5% Norwegian. My wife, my children, and grandchildren, in short everything I love most in this world have someone who was a slave. Who were from the Congo, and the Bantu people from South and central Africa. The sad reality is, there is a high probability we won’t be able to find who they (he she) are and do their Temple work.

I have seen and known racism growing up in Georgia, but never in my household growing up. My wife’s family is another matter, which led me to believe that they “postest too much”, to coin a phase”. Thankfully my wife was never of the same opinion, and having seen her Great-Great Grandmother, who was Cherokee, I questioned then was there an African-American somewhere in her genealogy. When I asked, she forbade me to bring the issue up in her home. Now that she has her genealogy, as do my children, I asked if she was going to tell her two remaining family members. She said they would just call her a liar, and told me not to bring it up. To use her words, “Bill, they already think you are leading me to hell for being a Mormon”. I think it is very cool, both Indian and African-American, and English as well, in fact more Scottish, as my DNA is as one sided as it could be.  

So, I have a question, how does the DNA tests work, as two of my children have some traits, or DNA, and two others have other markers. But, I do ask that asnwers be in layman terms, so all can take part and understand the replies. 

Looking forward to replies, and assistance. 

Edited by Bill “Papa” Lee

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Posted (edited)
2 hours ago, Bill “Papa” Lee said:

I recently posted my DNA results, which are 90% English, 5% Scot Irish, and 5% Norwegian. My wife, my children, and grandchildren, in short everything I love most in this world have someone who was a slave. Who were from the Congo, and the Bantu people from South and central Africa. The sad reality is, there is a high probability we won’t be able to find who they (he she) are and do their Temple work.

I have seen and known racism growing up in Georgia, but never in my household growing up. My wife’s family is another matter, which led me to believe that they “postest too much”, to coin a phase”. Thankfully my wife was never of the same opinion, and having seen her Great-Great Grandmother, who was Cherokee, I questioned then was there an African-American somewhere in her genealogy. When I asked, she forbade me to bring the issue up in her home. Now that she has her genealogy, as do my children, I asked if she was going to tell her two remaining family members. She said they would just call her a liar, and told me not to bring it up. To use her words, “Bill, they already think you are leading me to hell for being a Mormon”. I think it is very cool, both Indian and African-American, and English as well, in fact more Scottish, as my DNA is as one sided as it could be.  

So, I have a question, how does the DNA tests work, as two of my children have some traits, or DNA, and two others have other markers. But, I do ask that asnwers be in layman terms, so all can take part and understand the replies. 

Looking forward to replies, and assistance. 

There should be an explanation on the website. Different companies use different methods. But generally, children inherit 50% (half) their DNA from each parent through the parents' sex cells (sperm and egg,  the gametes). At the same time, these sex cells of each parent are far from identical to each other in the genetic code they carry, so there can be wide swings between the genetic makeup of each of the children due to the wide range of percentages possible to have been carried through to them from prior generations. One of your children could have begun with an egg that had a lot of Cherokee material, and other African, and another English, etc. You might even have a child that began with a sperm holding a lot of Norwegian material, despite the low probability.

Edited by CV75
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35 minutes ago, CV75 said:

There should be an explanation on the website. Different companies use different methods. But generally, children inherit 50% (half) their DNA from each parent through the parents' sex cells (sperm and egg,  the gametes). At the same time, these sex cells of each parent are far from identical to each other in the genetic code they carry, so there can be wide swings between the genetic makeup of each of the children due to the wide range of percentages possible to have been carried through to them from prior generations. One of your children could have begun with an egg that had a lot of Cherokee material, and other African, and another English, etc. You might even have a child that began with a sperm holding a lot of Norwegian material, despite the low 5% probability.

Thank you, this explains why one child is almost identical to mine, and the other three have Native American, and African markers in their results. But DNA tests do help people target their approach while tracing their genealogy. My family was here in the U.S., as early, if not earlier, in the late 1600’s. They fought in the Revolutionary War, and in the Civil War. My great grandfather x 3, was with General Lee, at Appomattox the day the South surrendered, he was Cpl Wesley Harris Mitchell. I wish however he fought against slavery, instead of keeping that deplorable institution. After returning home he founded the First Methodist Church, less that a mile from the Atlanta, Georgia Temple. His Father build the oldest standing structure in Fulton County, in 1813 just two miles from the Temple. In fact both their houses still stand, as protected historical homes. Again, thank you for your response. 

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I was just watching a youtube video about the DNA tests and what they can and can't tell us about our lineage:

 

DNA is interesting stuffs....and our understanding of how it all works can be limited and/or oversimplified to say the least. Taking the DNA tests would be fun to do one day. I figure my DNA would be pretty straight forward with my husband's more likely to throw in some genetic surprises. But neither of our stories, culture, and heritage would or really could be encapsulated in a little vial. That is base off of our own histories and feelings towards it. 

 

With luv,

BD

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1 hour ago, Bill “Papa” Lee said:

Thank you, this explains why one child is almost identical to mine, and the other three have Native American, and African markers in their results. But DNA tests do help people target their approach while tracing their genealogy. My family was here in the U.S., as early, if not earlier, in the late 1600’s. They fought in the Revolutionary War, and in the Civil War. My great grandfather x 3, was with General Lee, at Appomattox the day the South surrendered, he was Cpl Wesley Harris Mitchell. I wish however he fought against slavery, instead of keeping that deplorable institution. After returning home he founded the First Methodist Church, less that a mile from the Atlanta, Georgia Temple. His Father build the oldest standing structure in Fulton County, in 1813 just two miles from the Temple. In fact both their houses still stand, as protected historical homes. Again, thank you for your response. 

You're most welcome -- and I had to edit my previous post because the low probability is not 5%, only seemingly so to the casual and careless observer, and I was one in my haste! :) Just a technical clarification; the answer in essence is the same.

I and a couple of siblings have had our DNA tests done as well, and we show a good deal of variation one from another. We are accustomed to thinking in terms of national origin (where we are all the same mix) and not so much genetic origin. But as you point out, where these data sets intersect (along with race and ethnicity), we can find a good many clues for family history research. What a rich heritage you have!

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Keep in mind that DNA tests are Euro -centric in nature due to the fact that the databases are dominated by European DNA samples.

Therefore the African ancestry estimates are a bit less precise than others. 

Found my African ancestry hidden in my genealogy first and then confirmed with DNA.

African ancestry in an old-line LDS family was a bit problematic to talk about until recently. 

My mom still doesn't want to acknowledge it, unfortunately. 

I think it is both cool and troubling. 

Jb

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14 hours ago, jbarm said:

Keep in mind that DNA tests are Euro -centric in nature due to the fact that the databases are dominated by European DNA samples.

Therefore the African ancestry estimates are a bit less precise than others. 

Found my African ancestry hidden in my genealogy first and then confirmed with DNA.

African ancestry in an old-line LDS family was a bit problematic to talk about until recently. 

My mom still doesn't want to acknowledge it, unfortunately. 

I think it is both cool and troubling. 

Jb

I have friends in Church who would think that would be unfortunate that my wife, kids, and grandkids have this in their background. I won’t mention it at Church for fear someone would say something bad about my family. In short, if they did say something bad, it would be a bad day for us both. 

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20 hours ago, BlueDreams said:

I was just watching a youtube video about the DNA tests and what they can and can't tell us about our lineage:

 

DNA is interesting stuffs....and our understanding of how it all works can be limited and/or oversimplified to say the least. Taking the DNA tests would be fun to do one day. I figure my DNA would be pretty straight forward with my husband's more likely to throw in some genetic surprises. But neither of our stories, culture, and heritage would or really could be encapsulated in a little vial. That is base off of our own histories and feelings towards it. 

 

With luv,

BD

Thank you for the video, very informative and easy to understand. 

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Posted (edited)
On 4/17/2019 at 12:37 AM, Bill “Papa” Lee said:

Thank you, this explains why one child is almost identical to mine, and the other three have Native American, and African markers in their results. But DNA tests do help people target their approach while tracing their genealogy. My family was here in the U.S., as early, if not earlier, in the late 1600’s. They fought in the Revolutionary War, and in the Civil War. My great grandfather x 3, was with General Lee, at Appomattox the day the South surrendered, he was Cpl Wesley Harris Mitchell. I wish however he fought against slavery, instead of keeping that deplorable institution. After returning home he founded the First Methodist Church, less that a mile from the Atlanta, Georgia Temple. His Father build the oldest standing structure in Fulton County, in 1813 just two miles from the Temple. In fact both their houses still stand, as protected historical homes. Again, thank you for your response. 

Many people fighting on the side of the Confederacy, perhaps most, were not fighting because they loved slavery or wanted to keep it.  The Confederacy itself existed because of slavery (one should examine President Davis's remarks on the proposal of raising black southern regiments if one doubts this), but those who fought on its side were more frequently doing so out of loyalty to their state, or because they believed that the North was endangering their rights as free men.  So don't assume that your ancestor was fighting to keep slavery; he might have been, but it's unlikely. 

Oh, and one of my ancestors fought against your ancestor!  My great great grandfather Pvt Christian Stoltzmann was a recent immigrant from Germany, and signed up to fight for the Union as part of the 8th Indiana Infantry.  He never got near the Army of Northern Virginia, however, so your ancestor and mine never fought face to face!

From the film Gettysburg:

 

Edited by Stargazer
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On 4/17/2019 at 1:11 AM, BlueDreams said:

I was just watching a youtube video about the DNA tests and what they can and can't tell us about our lineage:

 

DNA is interesting stuffs....and our understanding of how it all works can be limited and/or oversimplified to say the least. Taking the DNA tests would be fun to do one day. I figure my DNA would be pretty straight forward with my husband's more likely to throw in some genetic surprises. But neither of our stories, culture, and heritage would or really could be encapsulated in a little vial. That is base off of our own histories and feelings towards it. 

 

With luv,

BD

I know my genealogy extremely well on all ancestral lines down to my great great grandparents, and I definitely know where all of them come from.  When I did my DNA test (Ancestry.com) I found that the test correlated very well with what I knew already.  Ancestry also provided lists of probable cousins, and I found a number of people in the lists whom I already knew as my cousins. This includes a lady whom I am personally acquainted with, who is my second cousin once removed -- a rather distant relationship -- as we share one set of great great grandparents.

I wish that it had occurred to me to do DNA testing for my late wife -- we know her genealogy only back as far as her grandparents.  If we had had her DNA checked, we might have been able to find relatives who are now unknown to us.  Actually, while writing this it suddenly occurred to me that I could get one of her children to do a DNA test!  That would work, too, wouldn't it?  Wow!

But with these tests you can find out things you didn't want to know.  The video you posted indicated there are some white supremacists who use the tests to get all warm and fuzzy about being "pure" white.  Gosh, I hope they all find out they are part something they don't like, so they can be at war with themselves.  That would be soooo precious. 

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