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SettingDogStar

Mission Length Change (A Conference Rumor thread)

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17 minutes ago, Rain said:

Still, it hit me a couple of weeks ago that this boundless bundle of energy and joy who sometimes drives me a little crazy will be out of my daily life and right now  he is a balm to my soul.

I'm with you. My mum told me repeatedly that my mission nearly killed her. I used to think she was exaggerating, but I realise now she wasn't, having gone through this experience with so many families in our ward.

My first young man to serve was opposed by his family right up until he left, but they repented afterwards. As a counsellor in the bishopric, I would visit the dad every Monday after work just to check on him. He's a big, tough man (mechanic by profession, rugby mad), but most weeks he would weep on my shoulder. 'I had no idea how much I would miss him'.

One of the things I ask our missionaries when they are transferred is to remember to thank their parents when they go home. I figure the missionaries, despite all the ups and downs, are mostly having the times of their lives, but their parents are mostly just missing them deeply.

Placing children upon the altar didn't end with Abraham ...

Edited by Hamba Tuhan
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51 minutes ago, Hamba Tuhan said:

I'm with you. My mum told me repeatedly that my mission nearly killed her. I used to think she was exaggerating, but I realise now she wasn't, having gone through this experience with so many families in our ward.

My first young man to serve was opposed by his family right up until he left, but they repented afterwards. As a counsellor in the bishopric, I would visit the dad every Monday after work just to check on him. He's a big, tough man (mechanic by profession, rugby mad), but most weeks he would weep on my shoulder. 'I had no idea how much I would miss him'.

One of the things I ask our missionaries when they are transferred is to remember to thank their parents when they go home. I figure the missionaries, despite all the ups and downs, are mostly having the times of their lives, but their parents are mostly just missing them deeply.

Placing children upon the altar didn't end with Abraham ...

I’d rather a mission then Abraham’s sacrifice.

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5 minutes ago, SettingDogStar said:

I’d rather a mission then Abraham’s sacrifice.

Understood, though the ram is in the thicket in both scenarios, as a rule. And I genuinely believe that any differences are of degree and not type.

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1 hour ago, Hamba Tuhan said:

I'm with you. My mum told me repeatedly that my mission nearly killed her. I used to think she was exaggerating, but I realise now she wasn't, having gone through this experience with so many families in our ward.

My first young man to serve was opposed by his family right up until he left, but they repented afterwards. As a counsellor in the bishopric, I would visit the dad every Monday after work just to check on him. He's a big, tough man (mechanic by profession, rugby mad), but most weeks he would weep on my shoulder. 'I had no idea how much I would miss him'.

One of the things I ask our missionaries when they are transferred is to remember to thank their parents when they go home. I figure the missionaries, despite all the ups and downs, are mostly having the times of their lives, but their parents are mostly just missing them deeply.

Placing children upon the altar didn't end with Abraham ...

It is not the mission that killed me, but our relationship was never the same afterwards and I really miss that.  He was now an adult with his own life even when living at home.  And I expected a few more years before he got married, but he was married by the end of the year (and was basically working on creating his own family after a month or two of dating when they figured out this could be what they wanted so committed fully to developing their relationship, so just wasn't home much physically or mentally). We just didn't have the conversations we used to or the participation in family activities.

Edited by Calm
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In terms of conference predictions, I make this one: the speakers will use the word “supernal” between 6 and 8 times across the five sessions. However did this arcane word become so popular among the top tiers of church leadership?

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8 hours ago, esodije said:

In terms of conference predictions, I make this one: the speakers will use the word “supernal” between 6 and 8 times across the five sessions. However did this arcane word become so popular among the top tiers of church leadership?

I realize that your mileage varies, but how, exactly, does one use language to describe something that transcends such description?  Though your attitude toward spiritual things, perhaps, has shifted, is there something in your own life, whether art, or music, or even, perhaps, the elegance of a particular mathematic or scientific principle, that leaves you wanting for words to describe it adequately?  Are there not, esodije, as Shakespeare wrote, "more things in heaven and earth" than "are dreamt of in" [insert-pursuit-or-discipline-here]?

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9 hours ago, esodije said:

In terms of conference predictions, I make this one: the speakers will use the word “supernal” between 6 and 8 times across the five sessions. However did this arcane word become so popular among the top tiers of church leadership?

In our area, the popular repeated term is “tender mercies”.  And “good” Bishop, “good” so and so.  

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1 hour ago, MustardSeed said:

And “good” Bishop, “good” so and so.  

As opposed to Bad Bishop So-and-so?

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11 hours ago, esodije said:

In terms of conference predictions, I make this one: the speakers will use the word “supernal” between 6 and 8 times across the five sessions. However did this arcane word become so popular among the top tiers of church leadership?

It’s one of those words that sounds like someone made it up or was thinking of another word. Elder Packer used it a lot IIRC. When I first heard it from him, I thought it was a word he had made up. I don’t recall hearing it much outside of General Conference talks or Ensign articles, but it is a part of our modern English vocabulary.

And “even” many, many more times.

Edited by Bernard Gui

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27 minutes ago, Bernard Gui said:

And “even” many, many more times.

Not so much now that President Monson is gone. It is imitative of scriptural phrasing. 

Here’s a discussion about it on a Bible forum: 

https://www.waywordradio.org/discussion/topics/the-word-even-in-the-king-james-bible/

By the way, “supernal” is a fine word, a good addition to any vocabulary. 

Edited by Scott Lloyd
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Another Monsonism was use of the passive voice for effect, as in “hearts were softened, eyes were opened, testimonies were strengthened.”

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58 minutes ago, Scott Lloyd said:

Not so much now that President Monson is gone. It is imitative of scriptural phrasing. 

Here’s a discussion about it on a Bible forum: 

https://www.waywordradio.org/discussion/topics/the-word-even-in-the-king-james-bible/

It has become a regular feature in Church prayers and talks where I live, even Puyallup, Washington. Like supernal, I don’t recall hearing this usage anyplace else.

Edited by Bernard Gui
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25 minutes ago, Bernard Gui said:

It has become a regular feature in Church prayers and talks where I live, even Puyallup, Washington. Like supernal, I don’t recall hearing this usage anyplace else.

Maybe, just for fun, I’ll incorporate it into my everyday vernacular, even the wording I select in day-to-day conversation. 

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On 3/14/2019 at 11:31 AM, clarkgoble said:

The baptisms per missionary dropped significantly during that era which is a large reason why they reversed it. (As I suspect they may do, or at least adjust, the 18 year old missionary age which had a similar albeit worse effect) The reason Hinckley did it (Kimball was incapacitated at the time) was primarily due to cost. I should add that the counterargument is that there was a decrease in converts per missionary due to "low hanging fruit" all being picked from when the Church went international in a dramatic fashion in the 60's.

convertspermissionary.png

 

 

 

I love this chart! I had at least 5X the avg for my time. 

 

 

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12 hours ago, Scott Lloyd said:

Maybe, just for fun, I’ll incorporate it into my everyday vernacular, even the wording I select in day-to-day conversation. 

It's a pity you're not still writing, or you could sneak it into a story! 😀

Edited by Kenngo1969

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13 hours ago, Scott Lloyd said:

Maybe, just for fun, I’ll incorporate it into my everyday vernacular, even the wording I select in day-to-day conversation. 

I'm wondering if I should maybe do the same thing, even now.

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27 minutes ago, Ahab said:

I'm wondering if I should maybe do the same thing, even now.

You don’t have it down yet. The “even” has to be followed by a rewording of what you have already said in the sentence. 

Example:: “For dinner, I’ll have my favorite army meal, even cream chipped beef on toast.”

 

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8 minutes ago, Scott Lloyd said:

You don’t have it down yet. The “even” has to be followed by a rewording of what you have already said in the sentence. 

Example:: “For dinner, I’ll have my favorite army meal, even cream chipped beef on toast.”

 

Yeah I suppose I'll need to keep working on it, even if all I ever do is just try.

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Quote

 

Hymns of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (1985) No. 52, "The Day Dawn is Breaking[/I].

1. The day dawn is breaking, the world is awaking,
The clouds of night's darkness are fleeing away.
The worldwide commotion, from ocean to ocean,
Now heralds the time of the beautiful day.

[Chorus]
Beautiful day of peace and rest,
Bright be thy dawn from east to west.
Hail to thine earliest welcome ray,
Beautiful, bright, millennial day.

2. In many a temple the Saints will assemble
And labor as saviors of dear ones away.
Then happy reunion and sweetest communion
We'll have with our friends in the beautiful day.

3. Still let us be doing, our lessons reviewing,
Which God has revealed for our walk in his way;
And then, wondrous story, the Lord in his glory
Will come in his pow'r in the beautiful day.

4. Then pure and supernal, our friendship eternal,*
With Jesus we'll live, and his counsels obey
Until ev'ry nation will join in salvation
And worship the Lord of the beautiful day.

Text: Joseph L. Townsend, 1849-1942

Music: William Clayson, 1840-1887

D&C 29:11

D&C 45:59'

*Emphasis added by Kenngo1969

 

 

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