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SettingDogStar

Mission Length Change (A Conference Rumor thread)

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17 minutes ago, Rain said:

Still, it hit me a couple of weeks ago that this boundless bundle of energy and joy who sometimes drives me a little crazy will be out of my daily life and right now  he is a balm to my soul.

I'm with you. My mum told me repeatedly that my mission nearly killed her. I used to think she was exaggerating, but I realise now she wasn't, having gone through this experience with so many families in our ward.

My first young man to serve was opposed by his family right up until he left, but they repented afterwards. As a counsellor in the bishopric, I would visit the dad every Monday after work just to check on him. He's a big, tough man (mechanic by profession, rugby mad), but most weeks he would weep on my shoulder. 'I had no idea how much I would miss him'.

One of the things I ask our missionaries when they are transferred is to remember to thank their parents when they go home. I figure the missionaries, despite all the ups and downs, are mostly having the times of their lives, but their parents are mostly just missing them deeply.

Placing children upon the altar didn't end with Abraham ...

Edited by Hamba Tuhan
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51 minutes ago, Hamba Tuhan said:

I'm with you. My mum told me repeatedly that my mission nearly killed her. I used to think she was exaggerating, but I realise now she wasn't, having gone through this experience with so many families in our ward.

My first young man to serve was opposed by his family right up until he left, but they repented afterwards. As a counsellor in the bishopric, I would visit the dad every Monday after work just to check on him. He's a big, tough man (mechanic by profession, rugby mad), but most weeks he would weep on my shoulder. 'I had no idea how much I would miss him'.

One of the things I ask our missionaries when they are transferred is to remember to thank their parents when they go home. I figure the missionaries, despite all the ups and downs, are mostly having the times of their lives, but their parents are mostly just missing them deeply.

Placing children upon the altar didn't end with Abraham ...

I’d rather a mission then Abraham’s sacrifice.

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5 minutes ago, SettingDogStar said:

I’d rather a mission then Abraham’s sacrifice.

Understood, though the ram is in the thicket in both scenarios, as a rule. And I genuinely believe that any differences are of degree and not type.

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1 hour ago, Hamba Tuhan said:

I'm with you. My mum told me repeatedly that my mission nearly killed her. I used to think she was exaggerating, but I realise now she wasn't, having gone through this experience with so many families in our ward.

My first young man to serve was opposed by his family right up until he left, but they repented afterwards. As a counsellor in the bishopric, I would visit the dad every Monday after work just to check on him. He's a big, tough man (mechanic by profession, rugby mad), but most weeks he would weep on my shoulder. 'I had no idea how much I would miss him'.

One of the things I ask our missionaries when they are transferred is to remember to thank their parents when they go home. I figure the missionaries, despite all the ups and downs, are mostly having the times of their lives, but their parents are mostly just missing them deeply.

Placing children upon the altar didn't end with Abraham ...

It is not the mission that killed me, but our relationship was never the same afterwards and I really miss that.  He was now an adult with his own life even when living at home.  And I expected a few more years before he got married, but he was married by the end of the year (and was basically working on creating his own family after a month or two of dating when they figured out this could be what they wanted so committed fully to developing their relationship, so just wasn't home much physically or mentally). We just didn't have the conversations we used to or the participation in family activities.

Edited by Calm

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In terms of conference predictions, I make this one: the speakers will use the word “supernal” between 6 and 8 times across the five sessions. However did this arcane word become so popular among the top tiers of church leadership?

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8 hours ago, esodije said:

In terms of conference predictions, I make this one: the speakers will use the word “supernal” between 6 and 8 times across the five sessions. However did this arcane word become so popular among the top tiers of church leadership?

I realize that your mileage varies, but how, exactly, does one use language to describe something that transcends such description?  Though your attitude toward spiritual things, perhaps, has shifted, is there something in your own life, whether art, or music, or even, perhaps, the elegance of a particular mathematic or scientific principle, that leaves you wanting for words to describe it adequately?  Are there not, esodije, as Shakespeare wrote, "more things in heaven and earth" than "are dreamt of in" [insert-pursuit-or-discipline-here]?

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