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bsjkki

Is Come Follow Me for Primary too hard to modify for young classes

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I’ve read a couple of articles that are complaining Come Follow Me is too difficult to modify for young classes. I think this is a bit ridiculous. Classes are 20 minutes. Each lesson has a coloring sheet. It’s not rocket science. Most primary teachers I work with are dedicated and will study their lessons and most are or have been parents of young children. The church provides many more sources and helps on LDS.org that can be found with minimal effort. I guess I have a lot more confidence in primary teachers. The Primary Predidency is there to help those that may need extra help.

https://bycommonconsent.com/2019/01/07/call-for-guest-posts-teachingprimarycfm/

https://religionnews.com/2019/01/05/the-new-mormon-primary-manuals-were-not-designed-with-real-children-in-mind/

“It seemed clear to me that no one is thinking about three-year-olds. These lessons are so far over their heads, it’s silly. The sad thing for me is that the old lesson manual (Primary 1) was absolutely spot on for this age group. I suspect I won’t be the only teacher looking back to those pages for help. ...

...The next suggestion is “Play a game where one child does an action and then tells the other children, ‘Come, follow me.’” This could be fun, but my question is—are you really teaching a concept of following to these children or just playing a game? And if you’re just playing a game, maybe a better game could be suited to age-appropriate learning? (I often play a game of matching anima cards, with mother and child animal pairs that my kids love).

Next is the suggestion, “You can also show the video ‘Light the World’ (LDS.org). Let the children identify how the people are following the Savior.” Really? Using a video? I’m sorry, but I always think it’s an abdication of your teaching responsibility to show a video, but especially in the case of young children. They’re often getting too much screen time already. Aren’t we at church to have real, human interactions?”

It goes on but you get the idea. 

Edited by bsjkki
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I think the Come Follow Me project fits any age. The challenge is always for the teacher to develop a teaching plan that fits the needs of their class. I don't understand the complaints; I chalk it up to typical whining when change is implemented. 

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1 hour ago, Storm Rider said:

I think the Come Follow Me project fits any age. The challenge is always for the teacher to develop a teaching plan that fits the needs of their class. I don't understand the complaints; I chalk it up to typical whining when change is implemented. 

I think the main thing is prayer, study and a lot of practice.  Many of us teachers are self conscious and have a hard time asking good questions.  I've appreciated the Come, Follow Me youth curriculum, and Teaching in the Savior's Way.  My discussions across the board have improved over the past few years.  I'm not expert by any means.  But the more I practice, the better the participation and Spirit.

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Does no one play Simon Says any more?  Get creative and call it " Follow Fred" or even better use the kids' names when it is them ( they tend to love being inserted into stories, one of the favorites was "John and the Three Bears" with chocolate pudding---his favourite---for the porridge).  Game easily points to teaching obedience to parents about dangerous things like hot irons and stoves and then obedience to things parents think will help one feel better, like going to bed at a regular time or brushing teeth.

If obedience is preferred not to be the focus, following games that leads to secret hiding places or following a recipe to make cakes in a mug, etc. all point to how we can benefit and even learn by following others.  Teach a new skill depending on how advance they are by following..like cutting snowflakes into easy shapes by cutting just like you are.  In good weather, follow a map in a park to a picnic basket.

Reading scriptures...kids can dress up a bit with towels and bathrobes or dad's t shirts with a belt to get the idea they are talking about people who lived in another place and time.

I miss it is just two adults in our case.

Edited by Calm
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7 hours ago, SteveO said:

They need to read this:

http://oneclimbs.com/2013/07/03/let-them-govern-themselves-by-boyd-k-packer/

I heard it quoted listening to an ebook this past week.  One quote I think is very relevant:

The most dangerous side effect of all we have prescribed in the way of programming and instructions and all is the over regimentation of the Church. This over regimentation is a direct result of too many programmed instructions. If we would compare the handbooks of today with those of a generation ago you would quickly see what I mean. And Brother Hanks mentioned that the Melchizedek Priesthood Handbook is an amalgamation of several handbooks and a reduction of them all with, I think, nothing lost; much gained.

“Teach them correct principles,” the prophet said, “and then let,” let–a big word, “them govern themselves.” (See messages of the Firsts Presidency, p. 54.) Our members should not, according to the scriptures, need to be commanded in all things. (See D&C 58:26)

Local leaders have been effectively conditioned to hold back until programmed as to what to do, how, to whom, when, and for how long. Can you see that when we overemphasize programs at the expense of principles, we are in danger of losing the inspiration, the resourcefulness, that which should characterize Latter-day Saints. Then the very principle of individual revelation is in jeopardy and we drift from a fundamental gospel principle!

 

Bingo 👌🏻

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The old books were horrible!  I can't believe anyone is trying to use them as an example of a good lesson.  

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1 hour ago, bluebell said:

The old books were horrible!  I can't believe anyone is trying to use them as an example of a good lesson.  

And inaccurate!

 

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I think the main criticism is that for people who aren't creative, might not yet have kids of their own, or just don't know how to teach that the current manuals are pretty intimidating. One advantage of the old manuals (some which were good, some bad) is that things were spelled out much more explicitly. That's nice for people who feel like they don't know what they're doing. For anyone with kids of that age or for people simply comfortable with teaching it's not a big deal to take very vague and brief lessons and expand them. All good teachers do that. But I think many don't realize that skill isn't something everyone has - especially out in the mission field areas where you have a lot of converts thrown into the deep end of Primary.

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11 hours ago, Kenngo1969 said:

My beloved auntie shared an account with me (I'm not sure if this is something she heard, something she read, from someone else she knows, et cetera, so forgive the fuzzy provenance) of a lady who had been called as a Primary teacher (perhaps as a pro tem substitute rather than as a formally-called Primary teacher).  The class was composed of very young children, Sunbeams, I think.  This sister had just begun returning to full fellowship, and didn't have a lot of experience teaching period, let alone teaching very young children.  Her assigned lesson?  Repentance.  She wondered how she could possibly teach such a sensitive subject to such a young class.  She gets to class and asks her young students, "So, what is repentance?"  Whereupon one of her charges replies, "It means we get to twy agin."  Out of the mouths of babes! :D

People who have made a profession of complaining about curriculum in the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints will complain about curriculum no matter what the Church of Jesus Christ does.  If those very people were called to assist in curriculum development, they still would complain about the process.  ("We weren't given enough support," "So what if the Church of Jesus Christ used my idea.  It was a bad idea!" et cetera, ad infinitum, ad nauseam).

 

This made me think of some lessons I teach as a sub in the school district. Oftentimes they dumb down the students, where the students get bored. So in those instances I start to teach off the cuff and let them teach me!

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6 hours ago, Tacenda said:

Oftentimes they dumb down the students, where the students get bored. So in those instances I start to teach off the cuff and let them teach me!

When I was lecturing in America, I had a spoken but unwritten policy: any student who teaches me something that I then adopt and teach to future students gets an A.

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On 1/10/2019 at 7:53 AM, bluebell said:

The old books were horrible!  I can't believe anyone is trying to use them as an example of a good lesson.  

The last D&C Primary manual was actually quite good. 2018's Old Testament was horrible. For a slew of reasons. But in general most teachers don't follow the manual too closely. It mainly picks the topics - although the OT topics were pretty bad. Not sure what I think of this year's. Still trying to figure out how I present Mary and Elizabeth this week to 8 year olds.

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9 minutes ago, clarkgoble said:

The last D&C Primary manual was actually quite good. 2018's Old Testament was horrible. For a slew of reasons. But in general most teachers don't follow the manual too closely. It mainly picks the topics - although the OT topics were pretty bad. Not sure what I think of this year's. Still trying to figure out how I present Mary and Elizabeth this week to 8 year olds.

I’m thinking of the sunbeam manual. That one was bad. 

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Yeah the nursery and sunbeam manuals have long sucked. Which is sad as those can be really stressful classes if the right person isn’t called.

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1 hour ago, clarkgoble said:

The last D&C Primary manual was actually quite good. 

Mostly, but it does contain inaccurate historical information. 

I’ve done threads on this topic and will link to them when I have time.

Edited by bsjkki

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On 1/9/2019 at 7:53 PM, bsjkki said:

I’ve read a couple of articles that are complaining Come Follow Me is too difficult to modify for young classes. I think this is a bit ridiculous.

I tend to agree. With only 20 minutes for class, you just need to focus in on a few key principles and then spend the rest of the time on coloring, gaming, or whatever activity you want to throw into the mix. 

In our primary, we've been discussing the change for the last several months, and everyone has been extremely positive / excited about the new changes.

 

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