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Tithing

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7 minutes ago, Thinking said:

My son was hit by another driver a few years ago and it was determined that the other driver was at fault. The other driver's insurance company never wrote us a check. We took the car to an approved repair shop and got an estimate. After the work was approved, the shop did the repairs and the insurance company paid the shop directly. We would only have received a check if the car was totaled (repair cost > car value). I wonder if different insurance companies have different policies.

I think that must be the case.  Just like some companies have "crash forgiveness" and some don't.

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12 hours ago, Stargazer said:

I think that must be the case.  Just like some companies have "crash forgiveness" and some don't.

We had hail damage that would have cause a significant drop in selling the car (tons of divets but they weren't deep enough to crack the paint and cause rust, so it was a cosmetic issue) but did not decrease its quality of ride in any way. The bumps made it more interesting in appearance, dappled if the light hit it right.  Since we intended just to drive it into the ground, we decided to put the money in savings instead. Though we eventually did sell it and were then penalized for not having fixed it, but it was old enough it probably didn't make much difference. 

 The insurance people talked about it as simply restoring the lost value of the car to us, not restoring the car itself.  They didn't care what we did with the money.

Edited by Calm

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On 1/1/2019 at 2:44 PM, Alan said:

At best it was very foolish. But I think it is technically fraud.

The insurance company paid out in order to make the policyholder whole. If the car remains damaged, and therefore of reduced value, he is not whole.

 

He is indeed whole in that the value he lost as a consequence of the accident has been restored to him in the form of a cash payment. He may use that monetary value however he wishes. It does not have to be used to repair the car.

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7 hours ago, Scott Lloyd said:

He is indeed whole in that the value he lost as a consequence of the accident has been restored to him in the form of a cash payment. He may use that monetary value however he wishes. It does not have to be used to repair the car.

It happened to me, I got caught in the big hail storm driving home from work. Our insurance paid out a sum, but I still drive with the hail damage and deposited the check to put toward another vehicle in the future. I didn't see how all those hail dents could be fixed properly anyway. I don't feel a bit bad about not getting it fixed. But it's a 2007, so really not that new. 

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20 hours ago, Thinking said:

My son was hit by another driver a few years ago and it was determined that the other driver was at fault. The other driver's insurance company never wrote us a check. We took the car to an approved repair shop and got an estimate. After the work was approved, the shop did the repairs and the insurance company paid the shop directly. We would only have received a check if the car was totaled (repair cost > car value). I wonder if different insurance companies have different policies.

You have the option to do have the shop paid directly or receive the funds.

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1 hour ago, ttribe said:

You have the option to do have the shop paid directly or receive the funds.

Does that depend on the insurance company, because we were never given the option to just receive the funds?

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9 hours ago, Thinking said:

Does that depend on the insurance company, because we were never given the option to just receive the funds?

It might depend on whether you own the car completely or if you are still making payments. I'm not sure you get the cash option if you are making payments because the bank is invested in the value of the car.

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On 1/4/2019 at 2:31 PM, Calm said:

We had hail damage that would have cause a significant drop in selling the car (tons of divets but they weren't deep enough to crack the paint and cause rust, so it was a cosmetic issue) but did not decrease its quality of ride in any way. The bumps made it more interesting in appearance, dappled if the light hit it right.  Since we intended just to drive it into the ground, we decided to put the money in savings instead. Though we eventually did sell it and were then penalized for not having fixed it, but it was old enough it probably didn't make much difference. 

 The insurance people talked about it as simply restoring the lost value of the car to us, not restoring the car itself.  They didn't care what we did with the money.

When I was unemployed my car was battered by hail and I got a $6000 check for cosmetic damage. Kept me afloat.  Considered it the blessings of the Lord literally raining down on me. ;) 

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11 hours ago, Thinking said:

Does that depend on the insurance company, because we were never given the option to just receive the funds?

What's more likely is you got an adjuster that didn't want to tell you all of your options. 

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