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JLHPROF

Happy Pancake Day!

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Or Shrove Tuesday.  Or Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday).

So, what's everyone giving up for Lent? ;)



e72e2ab3f00307cd860010eb7399ab80--shrove

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I have holy envy with Lent.  I don't want to observe Lent per se, but I think it would be helpful to me if our church put more emphasis on preparing to observe Easter.  

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Karneval/Fasching/Fastnacht (the word varies regionally within German-speaking countries) began last week and runs into this week. We do some things culturally in German class. One fun thing is that Köln (Cologne) starts theirs on 11/11 at 11:11, and it is n-u-t-s! Rivals Mardi Gras in New Orleans. On November 9th (no school that Friday, and Veteran's Day was Saturday this year), I arranged to have five girls come into the classroom, walk up, cut off my tie, and run out as the students sat there stunned (in Köln, it's a tradition for girls to go around cutting men's ties off. They know this, and don't wear ties they don't want cut. They also want the girls to cut their ties. :) ).

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9 minutes ago, bluebell said:

I have holy envy with Lent.  I don't want to observe Lent per se, but I think it would be helpful to me if our church put more emphasis on preparing to observe Easter.  

The liturgical calendar is something that I deeply love. It sanctifies time -- it uses time to bring us closer to God. I love that there are feast days and fast days. I love that each day reminds us of a saint or of a significant event in the life of the Church or in the life of Our Savior. Each day teaches us something about our faith. I also love the times surrounding Advent/Christmas and Lent/Easter as it takes us through a cycle of fast and feast for the most important moments in Christianity.

I wonder if Mormons could do such a calendar. I don't see anything theologically controversial with it, do you? You could even have feast days for LDS saints and significant events in the LDS church.

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1 hour ago, JLHPROF said:

Or Shrove Tuesday.  Or Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday).

So, what's everyone giving up for Lent? ;)

Lentils... :)

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17 minutes ago, MiserereNobis said:

The liturgical calendar is something that I deeply love. It sanctifies time -- it uses time to bring us closer to God. I love that there are feast days and fast days. I love that each day reminds us of a saint or of a significant event in the life of the Church or in the life of Our Savior. Each day teaches us something about our faith. I also love the times surrounding Advent/Christmas and Lent/Easter as it takes us through a cycle of fast and feast for the most important moments in Christianity.

I wonder if Mormons could do such a calendar. I don't see anything theologically controversial with it, do you? You could even have feast days for LDS saints and significant events in the LDS church.

Theologically I don't think there is anything controversial, other than LDS don't believe that any day is holy so that would probably cause some conflict because a lot of members wouldn't believe it was necessary.  Even Easter is barely celebrated on a church level so I think it would be difficult to rally the church to 'sanctify time' as you said.

But it sounds beautiful and I can see why Catholics would love the liturgical calendar.

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Just now, bluebell said:

Even Easter is barely celebrated on a church level so I think it would be difficult to rally the church to 'sanctify time' as you said.

Really? Is there a particular reason for this? It could be a great way of joining with other Christians in celebrating the most important event in Christianity.

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2 minutes ago, MiserereNobis said:

Really? Is there a particular reason for this? It could be a great way of joining with other Christians in celebrating the most important event in Christianity.

I not sure.  The most obvious answer is that God has not told us that observing holy days is necessary.  Beyond that, I think there are a few reasons that the church doesn't have much of a relationship with the liturgical calendar.

I don't know how it works overseas but here in America I think that some of it comes from the LDS concept that the resurrection should be honored and acknowledged every Sunday (so special recognition is proper and acceptable but not necessarily required), and also part of how LDS do not see the resurrection as separate from the rest of the Atonement so your just as like to have talks in church on repentance, or the Fall of adam and eve as you are on the resurrection on Easter Sunday.

And then it's probably also partly because LDS tends to lean toward protestant/puritanical ideas when it comes to celebrating religious holidays.  We tend to be a 'less is more' kind of people when it comes to religious days in general.

And then a lack of members who see any theological reason to change and the likelihood that people would fight the idea that we needed to be doing anything more like the Catholics do is also probably a reason that the church has never looked into adopting a liturgical calendar. ;) 

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2 hours ago, bluebell said:

I have holy envy with Lent.  I don't want to observe Lent per se, but I think it would be helpful to me if our church put more emphasis on preparing to observe Easter.  

I often explain the Word of Wisdom as being like a permanent Lent, when people want to get into the weeds about "why this/ no that"

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12 minutes ago, CV75 said:

I often explain the Word of Wisdom as being like a permanent Lent, when people want to get into the weeds about "why this/ no that"

Yet Lent is by definition meant to be a impermanent situation. It is preparing us for the great feast of Easter and following the fast/feast cycle of the liturgical year.

Interestingly enough, Sundays during Lent do not count as Lent, so you are free to partake in whatever you have given up for Lent during Sundays. The reason is that Sunday is a feast day celebrating the resurrection of Our Lord, and as such trumps any fast day. That is why Lent starts 46 days before Easter but Lent is only 40 days long (like Jesus's fast in the desert). The 6 Sundays during Lent do not count.

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I haven't had a pan cake for years..what is that like???  Used to fight for then when I was little...!

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4 hours ago, MiserereNobis said:

The liturgical calendar is something that I deeply love. It sanctifies time -- it uses time to bring us closer to God. I love that there are feast days and fast days. I love that each day reminds us of a saint or of a significant event in the life of the Church or in the life of Our Savior. Each day teaches us something about our faith. I also love the times surrounding Advent/Christmas and Lent/Easter as it takes us through a cycle of fast and feast for the most important moments in Christianity.

I wonder if Mormons could do such a calendar. I don't see anything theologically controversial with it, do you? You could even have feast days for LDS saints and significant events in the LDS church.

Mormons might wince at having something like Carnaval in Rio from Feb 9 to 14 (Ash Wednesday, when all my Catholic friends would show up at work with ash on their foreheads), but it might be nice to have some sort of pre-Lenten celebration.  As it is, we celebrate Easter and Christmas, and our own Pioneer Day on July 24 each year (a Utah holiday).

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7 hours ago, bluebell said:

I have holy envy with Lent.

I don't. I worked at an Anglican school one year, and during Lent the kids were banned from playing at recess. Instead, they were to spend the time contemplating their sins, and we teachers were to make sure they didn't give in to the temptation to play. It was awful.

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6 hours ago, bluebell said:

 Even Easter is barely celebrated on a church level so I think it would be difficult to rally the church to 'sanctify time' as you said.

This is true. My ward, however, does a pretty good job at celebrating Easter. I think it helps to live in a nation that, though essentially godless, clings to its traditions even if only for the sake of having time off work. Good Friday is sacrosanct, with shops all closed. Typically we have a ward activity together on Easter Monday, and some years we have Easter firesides.

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16 minutes ago, Hamba Tuhan said:

I don't. I worked at an Anglican school one year, and during Lent the kids were banned from playing at recess. Instead, they were to spend the time contemplating their sins, and we teachers were to make sure they didn't give in to the temptation to play. It was awful.

That doesn't happen at every school that observes Lent though.  

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14 minutes ago, Hamba Tuhan said:

This is true. My ward, however, does a pretty good job at celebrating Easter. I think it helps to live in a nation that, though essentially godless, clings to its traditions even if only for the sake of having time off work. Good Friday is sacrosanct, with shops all closed. Typically we have a ward activity together on Easter Monday, and some years we have Easter firesides.

My ward has an Easter Egg hunt the saturday before.  That's pretty much it for Easter Celebrations (other than a special musical number during Sacrament meeting).

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5 hours ago, MiserereNobis said:

Yet Lent is by definition meant to be a impermanent situation. It is preparing us for the great feast of Easter and following the fast/feast cycle of the liturgical year.

Interestingly enough, Sundays during Lent do not count as Lent, so you are free to partake in whatever you have given up for Lent during Sundays. The reason is that Sunday is a feast day celebrating the resurrection of Our Lord, and as such trumps any fast day. That is why Lent starts 46 days before Easter but Lent is only 40 days long (like Jesus's fast in the desert). The 6 Sundays during Lent do not count.

Yes MN.

People seldom do their greatest things in a day. Whether it be rejoicing, or whether it be penance, 24 hours isn't enough. We need seasons!

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We do have General Conference around Easter every year. ( It's not our fault someone decided to move Easter around :rolleyes:) I'm sure there is at least ONE talk on Christ during Conference.

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1 hour ago, bluebell said:

My ward has an Easter Egg hunt the saturday before.  That's pretty much it for Easter Celebrations (other than a special musical number during Sacrament meeting).

You don't have an Easter-themed sacrament meeting?

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9 hours ago, JLHPROF said:

Or Shrove Tuesday.  Or Mardi Gras (Fat Tuesday).

So, what's everyone giving up for Lent? ;)



e72e2ab3f00307cd860010eb7399ab80--shrove

In the Orthodox tradition, Lent always starts on a Monday, called Clean Monday. This year it falls on Feb 19. What’s given up is the same every year - anything that doesn’t align with a vegan diet. So, no meat, dairy, fish, or eggs until Pascha (Easter Sunday), April 8. A meatless Lent used to be universal, but this is now rare in the West, typically practiced by only the most traditional Christians. 

To those who will be fasting this Lent, as the Orthodox say, may you have an easy fast!

Edited by Spammer
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8 minutes ago, Spammer said:

Speaking of meatless Lents, St. Basil of Caesaria (4th c) described what we’re really supposed to give up: 

"Beware of limiting the good of fasting to mere abstinence from meats. Real fasting is alienation from evil. ‘Loose the bands of wickedness.’ Forgive your neighbor the mischief he has done you. Forgive him his trespasses against you. Do not ‘fast for strife and debate.’ You do not devour flesh, but you devour your brother. You abstain from wine, but you indulge in outrages. You wait for evening before you take food, but you spend the day in the law courts. Woe to those who are ‘drunken, but not with wine.’ Anger is the intoxication of the soul, and makes it out of its wits like wine."

~ St. Basil the Great

 

Good to see you!

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1 hour ago, Hamba Tuhan said:

You don't have an Easter-themed sacrament meeting?

Sometimes, it depends. You never know what you’re going to get until you show up. 

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5 minutes ago, bluebell said:

Sometimes, it depends. You never know what you’re going to get until you show up. 

Is this a nod to Forest Gump?

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2 hours ago, bluebell said:

Sometimes, it depends. You never know what you’re going to get until you show up. 

Interesting. I think we'd have a mutiny if our Easter sacrament meeting weren't focussed on, well, Easter.

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