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JAHS

Missionaries can now wear sun glasses

34 posts in this topic

On 6/12/2016 at 1:08 PM, The Nehor said:

Have you ever met our missionaries? 😜

:PI have...some are so sweet and some more naive than others..they shine.  But I was so surprised that sunglasses took so long to be vogue...!

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13 hours ago, sunstoned said:

Back in the day (before my time) some missions required Elders to wear hats. At least that is what I gathered from hearing RM conversations at church when I was a kid.  Apparently in the 50's and 60's a hat was considered part of the conservative dress for men.  I am assuming the hats were the fedora style.

As for sunglasses, I wore them on my mission when I drove.  I don't remember any rules about there use.

Hats were worn by pretty much everyone when they went outside up until the 1960's. 

I wore sunglasses as well.  I don't believe there was anything in the handbook saying you couldn't wear them.  I have light sensitive eyes and they really helped while riding a bike in the summer sun.

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11 hours ago, ksfisher said:

Hats were worn by pretty much everyone when they went outside up until the 1960's. 

I wore sunglasses as well.  I don't believe there was anything in the handbook saying you couldn't wear them.  I have light sensitive eyes and they really helped while riding a bike in the summer sun.

I agree. I was never a hat person, but my eyes are very sensitive, so I did were sun glasses, but I would take them off when speaking to a person face to face.

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On 5/18/2016 at 6:03 PM, Jeanne said:

Does anybody think that telling young men what kind of sunglasses to wear is a bit micro managing?? 

No, I don't. Young men are not the wisest people in their choices.

I don't want to see missionaries in mirrored shades or some strange design.

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2 hours ago, mnn727 said:

No, I don't. Young men are not the wisest people in their choices.

I don't want to see missionaries in mirrored shades or some strange design.

I think I give them more credit than you do. 

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5 hours ago, Jeanne said:

I think I give them more credit than you do. 

You do, mistakenly. Do you know any 18-22 year old young men?

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2 minutes ago, mnn727 said:

You do, mistakenly. Do you know any 18-22 year old young men?

:PWork with plenty of them and my son used to be one.  Heya..a new business for you and I...Hook up with Mr. Mac and make missionary sunglasses...a little LDS logo on the corner of a frame. 

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On 7/12/2017 at 10:29 PM, sunstoned said:

1300065-hd-the-blues-brothers-wp-for-pc.

White shirt, dark suit, sun glasses and hat.  New Missionary look?

Or Men/Women in Black.

Or Top Gun / (Water Pistol)

etc.... 

Who knows, each mission might get to riff on their own local theme. B:)

Edited by hagoth7
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On that note, a portable veil of forgetfulness. The screenwriter *must* have been LDS.

89d944e489ffa84b0ee2e96104c162a4--men-in

Edited by hagoth7
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