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hagoth7

Muslim Scholar Recommends The Book Of Mormon To Jon Stewart

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This week, Reza Aslan, a best-selling Muslim author/scholar, recommended the Book of Mormon to Jon Stewart.

 

Although Mr. Aslan's recommendation was tongue in cheek, several of the comments in the interview are actually worth a listen, if you have a few minutes.

If you don't have time to hear the whole interview, which is the last segment of the show (that starts around 14:56), I suggest that you fast forward to around 18:20 to catch the last two minutes or so.

http://thedailyshow.cc.com/full-episodes/okco56/may-13--2015---reza-aslan?xrs=synd_facebook_051415_tds_66

 

Thoughts?

 

 

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This week, Reza Aslan, a best-selling Muslim author/scholar, recommended the Book of Mormon to Jon Stewart.

 

Although Mr. Aslan's recommendation was tongue in cheek, several of the comments in the interview are actually worth a listen, if you have a few minutes.

If you don't have time to hear the whole interview, which is the last segment of the show (that starts around 14:56), I suggest that you fast forward to around 18:20 to catch the last two minutes or so.

http://thedailyshow.cc.com/full-episodes/okco56/may-13--2015---reza-aslan?xrs=synd_facebook_051415_tds_66

 

Thoughts?

Yes, Aslan's observations on interpretation of Scripture are particularly perspicacious -- and dovetail well with the frequent observations on this board of Mark Bukowski.

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I despised "Zealot," Aslan's latest book. It's a poor work academically, and tries to make Christ out to be some political revolutionary that he wasn't.

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I despised "Zealot," Aslan's latest book. It's a poor work academically, and tries to make Christ out to be some political revolutionary that he wasn't.

I haven't read any of his books. But the Muslim faiths do reject, if I recall correctly, both Jesus' divine origins, and his death on the cross.

 

So it's no surprise that some Christians don't care for Mr. Aslan's spin on things.

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I haven't read any of his books. But the Muslim faiths do reject, if I recall correctly, both Jesus' divine origins, and his death on the cross.

 

So it's no surprise that some Christians don't care for Mr. Aslan's spin on things.

I despise it from an academic standpoint. The revolutionary Jesus isn't even close to the historical Jesus as understood in academia. That aside, Muslims still believe that Jesus is the Messiah and in his 2nd coming.

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I despise it from an academic standpoint. The revolutionary Jesus isn't even close to the historical Jesus as understood in academia. That aside, Muslims still believe that Jesus is the Messiah and in his 2nd coming.

 

I had an experience with a Muslim man while on my mission while tracting where he treated us with an incredibly high degree of respect simply because we were servants of Christ.  Until then, i had no idea that Muslims cared about Jesus Christ.

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Yeah, it's actually a point of debate among Muslims whether Jesus or Mohammed was the greater one. Many Muslims accept even a sort of semi-divine state for Jesus, even referring to him as the Word of God, if not his Son.

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That was an interesting interview.  I especially liked the part about how, as a Muslim, it was obligated that he respond to "Merry Christmas" with "F... You!"  It's in the Koran, he said.  Stewart said he had thought that it was in the Hadith, but now he had it straight.  I laughed very hard at that.  It was funny. 

 

Well, you had to be there, I guess.

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That was an interesting interview.  I especially liked the part about how, as a Muslim, it was obligated that he respond to "Merry Christmas" with "F... You!"  It's in the Koran, he said.  Stewart said he had thought that it was in the Hadith, but now he had it straight.  I laughed very hard at that.  It was funny. 

 

Well, you had to be there, I guess.

Apologies for the swearing. Forgot it was there.

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Daily show...it is expected isn't it?

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Apologies for the swearing. Forgot it was there.

 

Oh, I spent 8 years in the US Army.  And I have heard some extremely raw language.  I'm virtually impervious to swearing. 

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Daily show...it is expected isn't it?

I would prefer to be occasionally sworn at than frequently lied to or pandered to.  I disagree with many of Jon Stewart's conclusions, but I think he tends to be more open and transparent in his treatment of the news than a number of news sources out there.

 

Oh, I spent 8 years in the US Army.  And I have heard some extremely raw language.  I'm virtually impervious to swearing. 

Years back, I was almost blown over backwards when two drill sergeants apologized for their frequent swearing. (I thought drill sergeants were too tough and inflexible to apologize.)

Come to find out, one of them had previously been a member of the church.

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I would prefer to be occasionally sworn at than frequently lied to or pandered to.  I disagree with many of Jon Stewart's conclusions, but I think he tends to be more open and transparent in his treatment of the news than a number of news sources out there.

 

Years back, I was almost blown over backwards when two drill sergeants apologized for their frequent swearing. (I thought drill sergeants were too tough and inflexible to apologize.)

Come to find out, one of them had previously been a member of the church.

 

Vulgar language, in my memory, seems to be something that occurred in regular service, not while in my initial training.

 

In neither Basic Training or Advanced Infantry Training, I don't remember that my platoon's two drill sergeant swore at all.  In fact, I can't make the picture or sound come up of any of my BT company's training personnel ever swearing.  I am unsure why this is, except that perhaps they didn't.  It may have been policy. 

 

Well, they might have said "damn" or "hell".  But I can't remember that, either.

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Vulgar language, in my memory, seems to be something that occurred in regular service, not while in my initial training.

 

In neither Basic Training or Advanced Infantry Training, I don't remember that my platoon's two drill sergeant swore at all.  In fact, I can't make the picture or sound come up of any of my BT company's training personnel ever swearing.  I am unsure why this is, except that perhaps they didn't.  It may have been policy. 

 

Well, they might have said "damn" or "hell".  But I can't remember that, either.

Based on your avatar statement, I estimate that you went through combat training around 15 years before me. By the time of my training, any such policy against swearing was clearly dropped (or ignored). If you do a search, you'll see that "swore like a drill sergeant" is entering the vernacular to parallel the earlier "swore like a sailor".

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Based on your avatar statement, I estimate that you went through combat training around 15 years before me. By the time of my training, any such policy against swearing was clearly dropped (or ignored). If you do a search, you'll see that "swore like a drill sergeant" is entering the vernacular to parallel the earlier "swore like a sailor".

 

I was in BT and AIT from November 1975 to March 1976.

 

I don't know if there was a policy.  Probably there was.

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Hagoth7 & Stargazer...thank you for serving our country along with any others on this board, I honor you on this Memorial Day weekend and always! ♥♥

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Hagoth7 & Stargazer...thank you for serving our country along with any others on this board, I honor you on this Memorial Day weekend and always! ♥♥

 

Thanks!  And those who us never had to go in harm's way while in that service likewise thank those of us who did for their courage and sacrifice.

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My dad didn't serve in the war because of a back injury, but many did in his hometown. I forgot to say we need to honor those at home too. The families of those that serve, whether in harms way or not. They also are serving our country, by keeping everything safe and sound at home.

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Hagoth7 & Stargazer...thank you for serving our country along with any others on this board, I honor you on this Memorial Day weekend and always! ♥♥

Hi Tacenda,

 

Thank you, but I'll have to decline any credit, because I was merely a weekend warrior (National Guard).

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Hi Tacenda,

Thank you, but I'll have to decline any credit, because I was merely a weekend warrior (National Guard).

A weekend warrior that was ready if the call were to ever occur!! Many in Utah were called from the National Guard. My brother in law was in the National Guard but retired right before several of the units were called in.

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Hi Tacenda,

 

Thank you, but I'll have to decline any credit, because I was merely a weekend warrior (National Guard).

 

To quote John Milton:

 

"They also serve who only stand and wait"

 

From On His Blindness.

 

I tend to regard the service of those who actually came into harm's way as superior to mine, whose eight years never involved firing a shot or being shot at in earnest, but I was ready, willing, and able.  And so were you.  Don't denigrate yourself as a "mere" reservist. 

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