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Ham Clam

2015 "mormon" Movies

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I know of one coming out this year:

"Freetown" - April 8, 2015





 

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I know of two coming out this year:

"Freetown" - April 8, 2015

... and on a more disturbing level,a documentary on Warren Jeffs called 'Prophet Prey' premiering at the 2015 Sundance Festival 

Anymore that I don't know of?

 

I do not see how a movie about Warren Jeffs can be called a Mormon movie.

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There will be a movie about the Cokeville angels miracle.I believe T.C. Christensen is directing.

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I do not see how a movie about Warren Jeffs can be called a Mormon movie.

Yea, you're right. Didn't use the word Mormon well. Took it off the list.

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They need to make a Hollywood movie about the Book of Mormon wars. That would be cool to watch with the ending being Moroni burying the plates.

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They need to make a good movie...a bad movie would be worse than no movie at all.

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Also from Sundance 2015, two movies from Mormon filmmakers, and BYU grads, though the movies are not LDS themed.

"Don Verdean" by Jared and Jerusha Hess (the Napolean Dynamite filmmakers)

"Most Likely to Succeed" by Greg Whiteley (Documentary filmmaker whose film "Mitt" was released in 2014. His new documentary features fellow Mormon Ken Jennings.)

Of interest to LDS, perhaps, though done darkly: "I Am Michael": A documentary about a gay man, who converts to Christianity, and now says he is "ex-gay".

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They need to make a good movie...a bad movie would be worse than no movie at all.

 

Did you like Saratov Approach?  Freetown is the same director.  I loved Saratov... and now I'm really looking forward to Freetown.

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Not a movie, but AMC's Hell on Wheels (focused on the building of the Union Pacific railroad across the US) heavily involves Mormons. Brigham Young is a recurring character, and the main character's wife is a member.

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