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So in this day and age of technology and live streaming why do we not have segmented talks of GC as soon as they are given?  For instance if I wanted to see Elder Holland's talk but missed the session he gave it in, is there a centralized source where I could watch it?

 

Maybe I just haven't searched long enough.

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So in this day and age of technology and live streaming why do we not have segmented talks of GC as soon as they are given?  For instance if I wanted to see Elder Holland's talk but missed the session he gave it in, is there a centralized source where I could watch it?

 

Maybe I just haven't searched long enough.

That is I use my DVR to record so I do one talk at a time and when I see I missed something good I can go back right away.

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