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How Chick-Fil-A Hires: The Christian Way

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Y'all move to Georgia and see how God intended mankind to live.

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Y'all move to Georgia and see how God intended mankind to live.

I am originally from Macon. I was born and raised there. I miss it terribly. There is, indeed, a "taste of time, sweet and honeyed down the Seven Bridges Road."

I'm in California now. *sigh*

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I am originally from Macon. I was born and raised there. I miss it terribly. There is, indeed, a "taste of time, sweet and honeyed down the Seven Bridges Road."

I'm in California now. *sigh*

We will leave the light on for you sister!

Although, Heaven is where you make it.

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I miss the San Fran area of the 60s and 70s…that is home to me, never too hot, never too cool, always green, green, green and so many colors and flowers and birds and just life...

 

But towards the end it was too many cars and too long to get anywhere to have fun.   And apparently too many other people who loved it.  So no more home for me, sigh.  I don't do crowds.

 

Canada is next in line for environmental home, but I have to admit my little neighborhood here in small town Utah is about the most supportive and kind home I've ever had.  I have no doubt I can run across the street or next-door and demand outrageous things in an emergency and they will come through.  I really love that sense of security PLUS (and I am yelling on that) my husband has like a half of dozen great friends to do different stuff with so even when I get bed bound he still has a social life and has so much fun with no guilt on my part.  And his best friend from Canada just came down to join him at work! What could be better?  Now that summer is over with, we are living the dream. ;)

 

I just need a beach within walking distance….

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I miss the San Fran area of the 60s and 70s…that is home to me, never too hot, never too cool, always green, green, green and so many colors and flowers and birds and just life...

 

But towards the end it was too many cars and too long to get anywhere to have fun.   And apparently too many other people who loved it.  So no more home for me, sigh.  I don't do crowds.

 

A few years ago we visited in-laws who were serving a mission there. I got claustrophobia.

 

Maybe it was the size of the apartment where they lived, but the city just seemed way too crowded and too little personal space for my preference.

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We will leave the light on for you sister!

Although, Heaven is where you make it.

No, heaven exists only after you burn the world. Our cause is clear.

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The law is pretty simple. You can't discriminate on the basis of religion.

 

You cannot discriminate against employees and prospective employees on the basis of religion.  But it's generally different when talking about non-employee contractors and business partners.  It's not clear from the article whether a Chick-Fil-A franchisee would be considered an employee, but I suspect not.

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Chic-Fil-A treats it franchisees very much like its employees. Not saying if that is a good thing or a bad thing it just does.

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The owner of a local Chick-fil-A restaurant is once again garnering national attention for his actions.

When Wednesday's frigid temperatures sent what appeared to be a homeless man scurrying for warmth inside the Chick-fil-A at 4620 Highway 280, owner/operator Mark Meadows stepped up to the plate--much like he did during the 2014 "snowpocalypse."

Andrea Stoker, who was enjoying a meal with her son at the restaurant about 3 p.m. Wednesday, shared what she witnessed through a Facebook post on the Chick-fil-A corporate page. At the time of this writing, Stoker's account of what transpired has garnered nearly 100,000 Facebook "likes." Chick-fil-A has since shared the image and message as well.

"My son and I were at the location on Highway 280 in Birmingham, AL," wrote Stoker, "when a man came in to escape the 35 degree temps and strong winds with all of his earthly possessions strapped to his back."

Rather than ask him to leave, Stoker went on, Meadows walked up to the man and had a conversation.

In an interview with AL.com today, Meadows shared what occurred next.

"Sometimes," said Meadows, "we have individuals walk in the store that it's obvious need some help. Yesterday at around 3:30 p.m. a gentleman walked in--I don't know if he is homeless or not--but he walked up to me and asked if there was anything he could do to earn a little food."

Meadows said he answered with a question of his own.

"I asked him if he had a pair of gloves," said Meadows, "because he kept rubbing his hands together."

According to Stoker's account, Meadows not only arranged to feed the man, but also provided him with a little bit of extra comfort.

"Most businesses would force him out," wrote Stoker, "but I watched as the manager walked up to him and asked if he could do anything for him. Before the man could even answer, the manager asked if he had a pair of gloves and walked to the table at which he'd been sitting and picked up his own. As he handed the man his gloves, he asked another employee to get him something to eat."

Meadows is the same owner/operator who in January of last year helped distribute hundreds of chicken sandwiches and thousands of chicken biscuits to stranded Highway 280 motorists when a freak snow and ice storm paralyzed much of Birmingham.

Here are just a few of the comments left by Facebook users in response to Stoker's story:

Lanny Carruthers: Truett Cathy would be proud of this manager/owner.

Robin Cook: I know the man and his family.....they are awesome Godly family. Mark is a perfect example of the hands and feet of Christ.

Luke Meadows: So proud to call him my Dad! He has been such a great example of a Christ-loving leader!

Karen Chandler: Mr. Meadows has been there for years. I had complications from a surgery many years ago, and as a result, I had to go to Birmingham every day for 2 months for treatment. My mother and a friend took turns taking me. We stopped there OFTEN to eat. If it was raining, Mr.Meadows would come to the car with an umbrella to help us in, and escort us back out so that we wouldn't get wet. I will never forget his acts of kindness. He is a wonderful man.

Asked what drove him to help and reach out to others, Meadows brushed away the heroics of his actions.

"I just did the right thing," he said. "I'm simply awe struck about all this attention."

Meadows said he lives his life and runs his business guided not only by his Christian faith, but by the lessons he has learned from running a Chick-fil-A business for more than 25 years.

"Our corporate purpose explains it all. Our purpose," said Meadows reciting from memory, "is 'to Glorify God by being a faithful steward of all that is entrusted to us. To have a positive influence on all who come in contact with Chick-fil-A."

If Facebook "likes" count for anything, there are nearly 100,000 out there who believe Meadows is doing just fine fulfilling that duty.

 

http://www.al.com/news/birmingham/index.ssf/2015/01/post_184.html

 

 

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You can keep your calorie count down if you consciously decide to but switch to the more typical side of fries and soda or (heaven help you) a shake and you are around or over half your recommended intake of calories in one meal.

But that's true anywhere you eat. Watching calories is a conscience decision.

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But that's true anywhere you eat. Watching calories is a conscience decision.

Auto complete?  Spell check? ;)

 

It may be a conscience decision.  My conscience does tend to bother me some if I don't eat well.  It's also a conscious decision. :)

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