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How Chick-Fil-A Hires: The Christian Way

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Has bearing on LDS life and lifestyle:

 

There are a few things you need to become a franchisee operator of a Chick-fil-A.

A commitment to the company. A strong belief in “wholesome values”. A willingness to endure a year-long vetting process. And it helps if you are married.

What don’t you need? A lot of money.

Chick-fil-A is, store-for-store, the most successful fast food restaurant in America, despite all of its locations being closed once a week (Sundays). And yet, to become a franchise operator, a person only needs $5,000, compared to the $1.9 million it takes to open a KFC.

Rather than looking for operators with cash, S. Truett Cathy – the company’s founder – has always focused on finding people committed to the company’s mission statement. And what is that?

To glorify God by being a faithful steward of all that is entrusted to us,” it reads. “To have a positive influence on all who come in contact with Chick-fil-A.”

The Hiring Process

Chick-fil-A gets between 10,000 to 25,000 applicants a year from aspiring franchise operators to fill the 60 to 70 open slots that open up each year, according to www.ajc.com. As part of the application, Chick-fil-A asks candidates to disclose their marital status, number of dependents and their involvement in community, civil and religious organizations, according to southernstudies.com.

The company’s vetting process can include more than a dozen interviews with an applicant – some lasting hours – and the applicant’s family, including with their children, according to Forbes.Cathy told the magazine he is looking for married candidates (he believes they are more industrious) who are loyal, wholesome and treat their families well.

If a man can’t manage his own life, he can’t manage a business,” Cathy said, according to Forbes.

Chick-fil-A’s hiring practices have been met with opposition, as the company has been sued at least 12 times on charges of employment discrimination, according to Forbes. And yet that has done little to stop the company from becoming the most successful fast food restaurant in America on a per-store basis.

The average Chick-fil-A store produced $2.7 million in revenue in 2010, which was $300,000 more than second-place McDonald’s, according to www.ajc.com. And turnover at Chick-fil-A stores for both franchise operators and hourly workers are both far below industry averages, according to Forbes.

One quick note, unlike many fast food chains, Chick-fil-A owns all of its stores and has franchise operators instead of owners. The setup seems to be mutually beneficial, as the average Chick-fil-A franchise operator makes $190,000 a year, more than most franchise owners, according towww.ajc.com.

The Bottom Line

Chick-fil-A’s hiring process is like Zappos in same ways: it has a very clear culture and makes cultural fit a top priority. The results are hard to argue with, as the company is one of the most successful restaurant chains in America, despite Forbes reporting that its closed-on-Sunday edict costs the company $500 million a year.

Saying that, there are many critics to the restaurant’s hiring practices and it seems to be a lawsuit-magnet. And by looking for a certain profile, the company is potentially excluding great candidates.

Ultimately though, what makes the company successful is its top-down commitment to one, clear vision, whether you agree with it or not. And that is epitomized in its hiring practice.

 

http://www.hrzone.com/blogs/want-win-talent-war-identify-top-talent-faster-here%E2%80%99s-how/how-chick-fil-hires-christian-way

 

 

 

Sounds great.  I wonder what the company thinks of LDS franchisees? I searched on Chick-fil-A locations in Utah and there are a few. Didn't think there'd be many out that way. Obviously, that doesn't necessarily mean they are LDS. What are the laws on religious requirements for employment? Etc.

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I know the owner of one Chick-fil-A in Utah, and he's LDS.

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They don't have Chick-fill-A out here in the Northwest, but I went in California a while back and liked it as a restaurant. I am happy that their philosophy is working so well. I patronize restaurants on Sundays, and am of the opinion that such a business is providing a service that is needed and unlike with most retail businesses that should observe the Lord's Day, it is okay for restaurants to stay open. But its still great they close down. That way all the staff can easily fulfill their Sunday obligations. If I had kids needing an entry level kind of job...boy I'd point them in their direction in a hurry. 

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I know the owner of one Chick-fil-A in Utah, and he's LDS.

Better said, you know a franchisee.  If Forbes is right, the company owns the store. :)

 

P.S.: Looks like Chick-fil-A does pretty well in the Pretty, Great State of Utah :

 

http://www.chick-fil-a.com/Locations/Browse/UT

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"Pretty, Great (but blasted hot) State of Utah"

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Better said, you know a franchisee.  If Forbes is right, the company owns the store. :)

 

P.S.: Looks like Chick-fil-A does pretty well in the Pretty, Great State of Utah :

 

http://www.chick-fil-a.com/Locations/Browse/UT

 

Correct, of course. I know a franchisee.

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Has bearing on LDS life and lifestyle:

 

Sounds great.  I wonder what the company thinks of LDS franchisees? I searched on Chick-fil-A locations in Utah and there are a few. Didn't think there'd be many out that way. Obviously, that doesn't necessarily mean they are LDS. What are the laws on religious requirements for employment? Etc.

 

The law is pretty simple. You can't discriminate on the basis of religion.

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The law is pretty simple. You can't discriminate on the basis of religion.

 

However family values are not out of bounds.  Yet.

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The law is pretty simple. You can't discriminate on the basis of religion.

 

 

However family values are not out of bounds.  Yet.

 

 

It'd be interesting to know then the basis of the various lawsuits and if any of their franchisees are not Christian.

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My son's friend works at Chick Fil A. He loves working there. I went to the new one in Centerville, Utah and the way they treat you was real nice. Or I just lucked out and got the friendliest cashier ever. Also, they donated generously to a fundraiser I was involved in recently.

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However family values are not out of bounds.  Yet.

 

Evidently only certain family values are OK.

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Commendable but is obesity one of their family values? That stuff is very calorie dense. A sandwich, fries, and a shake almost fills the average adult's calorie needs for a day.

 

Don't get me wrong; I like it but when I eat it I have to make sure it is pretty much all that I eat that day.

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Commendable but is obesity one of their family values? That stuff is very calorie dense. A sandwich, fries, and a shake almost fills the average adult's calorie needs for a day.

 

Don't get me wrong; I like it but when I eat it I have to make sure it is pretty much all that I eat that day.

 

I beg to differ.  None of their entrees have more than 500 calories.  Compare that to McDonalds where you'd be hard pressed to find a sandwich with less than that amount. 

 

I've been watching my calorie intake lately and I love Chik Fil A because I can get a large meal that fills me up for hours for 580 calories (12 count grilled nuggets with 2 packages of honey mustard dipping sauce, side salad with honey sesame dressing, and a medium diet lemonade with one refill). 

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I beg to differ.  None of their entrees have more than 500 calories.  Compare that to McDonalds where you'd be hard pressed to find a sandwich with less than that amount. 

 

I've been watching my calorie intake lately and I love Chik Fil A because I can get a large meal that fills me up for hours for 580 calories (12 count grilled nuggets with 2 packages of honey mustard dipping sauce, side salad with honey sesame dressing, and a medium diet lemonade with one refill).

You can keep your calorie count down if you consciously decide to but switch to the more typical side of fries and soda or (heaven help you) a shake and you are around or over half your recommended intake of calories in one meal.

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"Pretty, Great (but blasted hot) State of Utah"

At least it is not humid and hot.

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It has been quite humid the past month with all the thunderstorms...,still dry in comparison to some places I've lived, but unusual for Utah.

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Here in Atlanta there is a rather large representation of Greek Orthodox in the Chick-fil-a hierarchy.  Many locations hire LDS employees, but I'm not sure if that is the chain looking for Saints, or Saints looking for employment that accommodates their desire to keep the Sabbath holy.

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"Pretty, Great (but blasted hot) State of Utah"

Stop it. Move to Phoenix in the middle of July and August.

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I'm glad I'm vegan and received the revelation to go that route.

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Stop it. Move to Phoenix in the middle of July and August.

You Utah Mormons just think you have the best of everything don't you?

(Cue Scott Lloyd)

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I am not a Utah Mo. I am an AZ Mo who happens to be a Ute fan.

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I am not a Utah Mo. I am an AZ Mo who happens to be a Ute fan.

True. Than your life is much more stress free than a Utah Mormon who roots for BYU.

I love the Pheonix area by the way. Visited the Camelback resort as a kid, and some friends during college. Swimming on Christmas Eve was fun, and entertaining for the neighbors.

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Stop it. Move to Phoenix in the middle of July and August.

No, thank you.  Happy Valley is bad enough.

 

August was pretty good this year in fact.  And it is heavenly right now except for the dogs barking across the street.  The owners always leave them tied up outside and they get on barking jags that go on and on and on….

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