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Brian 2.0

Dedicating Homes & The Priesthood

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The latest iteration of the Handbook made a change to the portion on Dedicating Homes.  In the past it was simply that church members can do it, it's a prayer, etc.  No mention of Priesthood in the section. (only have access to old handbook 1 right now so can't post that I think).

 

The newest version of the handbook changed it adding this (in bold):

 

A Melchizedek Priesthood holder may dedicate a home by the power of the priesthood. If there is not a Melchizedek Priesthood holder in the home, a family might invite a close relative, a home teacher, or another Melchizedek Priesthood holder to dedicate the home. Or a family might gather and offer a prayer that includes the elements mentioned in the preceding paragraph and other words as the Spirit directs.

(pulled from lds.org)

 

So has the dedications of homes become a Priesthood blessing?  It still lists the option for a family to gather and say a prayer (the non-priesthood version of doing it).

 

So what is the difference between a home dedicated by the power of the priesthood and a home dedicated by a non-priesthood holder saying a prayer?

 

If nothing, they why the new section in bold?

Edited by Brian 2.0

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The latest iteration of the Handbook made a change to the portion on Dedicating Homes.  In the past it was simply that church members can do it, it's a prayer, etc.  No mention of Priesthood in the section. (only have access to old handbook 1 right now so can't post that I think).

 

The newest version of the handbook changed it adding this (in bold):

 

A Melchizedek Priesthood holder may dedicate a home by the power of the priesthood. If there is not a Melchizedek Priesthood holder in the home, a family might invite a close relative, a home teacher, or another Melchizedek Priesthood holder to dedicate the home. Or a family might gather and offer a prayer that includes the elements mentioned in the preceding paragraph and other words as the Spirit directs.

(pulled from lds.org)

 

So has the dedications of homes become a Priesthood blessing?  It still lists the option for a family to gather and say a prayer (the non-priesthood version of doing it).

 

So what is the difference between a home dedicated by the power of the priesthood and a home dedicated by a non-priesthood holder saying a prayer?

 

If nothing, they why the new section in bold?

 

I will warn you upfront I would have a hard time finding a CFR on this (since there aren't exactly many records of home practices) but I was told that in the early days of the Church this was a priesthood blessing (even using arms to the square).  Just like with the sacrament the arm to the square was removed and then years back it was changed from a dedicatory ordinance to a dedicatory prayer.  But as I said, there aren't many records of home dedications from the 1800s.

 

Once it became a dedicatory prayer it was open to anyone to perform the prayer under the direction of the presiding priesthood authority, which is why it is usually the priesthood holder that offers the prayer.

 

One article on the subject - http://bycommonconsent.com/2011/01/13/priesthood-and-church-liturgy/ although the author here has difficulty tracing the practices back beyond 1900 as well.

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Or

 

Since it's my home, I can do whatever I want. Yep, I just figured it out. I'm going to play Kirk Gibson's home run on an endless loop for 24 hours while I play 80's music on my stereo. If that doesn't do the job, nothing will. :yahoo:

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I think I remember dedicating our home when I was first married. Since then we have move half a dozen times and can't remember doing after the first time. Maybe I am a bit slack but it does not seem a common occurrence around here. Do people on this board still dedicate homes regularly??

Btw I have always understood it to be a priesthood initiated thing.

Edited by Paddy

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The only person I know of who did it was my grandmother back in the 70s. Doesn't mean it doesn't happen a lot, but it would seem people don't talk about doing it much.

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I dedicated our home when we bought it.  I also think I dedicated the other houses we lived in before that, but it was a long time ago.

Edited by SeekerB

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I thought the home was to have been paid off first.

 

I see it as dedicating the "home" rather than the paid off "house", so no need to have it paid off first.

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When I moved into my little home where I am now, I asked a brother to come and dedicate it... I always just assumed it was a priesthood-type blessing.

Not long ago I renovated my kitchen.  Workmen were in and out for several weeks... after all was finished and put back in order, I rededicated my home again.  I have also marked the bounds of my property (the four corners) with lovely rocks... Whenever I have a yard cleanup, I have to remind the workers not to remove those particular rocks... nor the one that marks the grave of Charlie-cat out in the garden. 

I consider anything within these bounds to be my "holy place to stand."  Particularly my home.

 

from the beach... GG

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My husband has dedicated each of our 3 homes. He has occasionally looked it up in "Duties and blessings of the priesthood" but right now can't remember specifically which book it is in.

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I didn't realize that dedication of graves were so significant and needed permission to be done:

https://www.lds.org/manual/duties-and-blessings-of-the-priesthood-basic-manual-for-priesthood-holders-part-b/priesthood-and-church-government/lesson-5-performing-priesthood-ordinances?lang=eng

"Dedication of Graves

Graves should be dedicated by a Melchizedek Priesthood holder, as authorized by the priesthood officer who conducts the service. To dedicate a grave, he:

1. Addresses Heavenly Father.

2. States that he is acting by the authority of the Melchizedek Priesthood.

3. Dedicates and consecrates the burial plot as the resting place for the body of the deceased.

4. (Where appropriate) prays that the place may be hallowed and protected until the Resurrection.

5. Asks the Lord to comfort the family and expresses thoughts as the Spirit directs.

6. Closes in the name of Jesus Christ."

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Calmoriah

That's interesting because I attended my grandfathers funeral a few years back. He is an excommunicated member and had a grave side service done by a really nice Methodist minister. My father was serving a mission in Poland at the time so after the service my uncle who happened to be in Australia at the time dedicated the grave. I don't believe permission was sought from anyone.!! It just seemed to be one of those ordinances that did not need another's permission like a blessing on a home, etc. also it did not seem inappropriate. Now I know!

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Dedicating Homes

Church members may dedicate their homes as sacred edifices where the Holy Spirit can reside and where family members can worship, find safety from the world, grow spiritually, and prepare for eternal family relationships. Homes need not be free of debt to be dedicated. Unlike Church buildings, homes are not consecrated to the Lord. To dedicate a home, a family might gather and offer a prayer that includes the elements mentioned above and other words as the Spirit directs.

https://www.lds.org/manual/missionary-handbook/appendix-b?lang=eng&query=%22dedicating+homes%22

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Calmoriah

That's interesting because I attended my grandfathers funeral a few years back. He is an excommunicated member and had a grave side service done by a really nice Methodist minister. My father was serving a mission in Poland at the time so after the service my uncle who happened to be in Australia at the time dedicated the grave. I don't believe permission was sought from anyone.!! It just seemed to be one of those ordinances that did not need another's permission like a blessing on a home, etc. also it did not seem inappropriate. Now I know!

I would have thought so as well, a kindness to be done but perhaps it goes back to the tradition of a grave being under the care of the local priest so it is seen as significant.

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I thought the home was to have been paid off first.

That used to be the case but was changed a while ago. Now they specificy say that it does not need to be paid off.

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Applying my same question to another ordinance:

Is there a difference between a healing blessing by the power of the priesthood and a prayer asking for healing from a non-priesthood holder?

Would there ever be an instance where a priesthood blessing could have healed someone where a non-priesthood prayer would not bring about the same healing?

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So what is the difference between a home dedicated by the power of the priesthood and a home dedicated by a non-priesthood holder saying a prayer?

 

If nothing, they why the new section in bold?

 

Applying my same question to another ordinance:

Is there a difference between a healing blessing by the power of the priesthood and a prayer asking for healing from a non-priesthood holder?

Would there ever be an instance where a priesthood blessing could have healed someone where a non-priesthood prayer would not bring about the same healing?

I think it always was an option to use the priesthood—if people can say prayers without it, they can say them with it. The bolded portion, according to the context you present it (that it was missing from prior instructions), only clarifies that the priesthood can be used. I’ve used the priesthood to bless homes since the late 70’s when I learned the practice on my mission.

 

I see no difference in the effect of the blessing; the husband/father using the priesthood ties all that he has been given to the expression of faith, just as a single woman/mother ties all that she has been given of the Lord to the expression of faith. It is a matter of remembering the Lord in seeking the blessing of all that we have at our disposal (in this case, a home) by all the means we have at our disposal (in this case, priesthood, Gift of the Holy Ghost, faith, etc.). The effect on the individuals giving the blessing would be different according to how they truly value the priesthood, Gift of the Holy Ghost and faith.

 

I think the same goes for a healing blessing by the power of the priesthood and a prayer asking for healing from a non-priesthood holder.

 

The only instance I can think where a priesthood blessing could have healed someone while a non-priesthood prayer would not bring about the same healing is how the one praying is using the other gifts from God (Gift of the Holy Ghost and faith), and the attitude and motive in which it was done.

 

But if someone with conferred priesthood is accessible, by all means access it, whether it is by himself, with a friend, or by calling upon someone who has it.

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I dedicated our home the first day we moved in. Then had a mortgage burning party when it was paid off.

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I think it always was an option to use the priesthood—if people can say prayers without it, they can say them with it. The bolded portion, according to the context you present it (that it was missing from prior instructions), only clarifies that the priesthood can be used. I’ve used the priesthood to bless homes since the late 70’s when I learned the practice on my mission.

 

I see no difference in the effect of the blessing; the husband/father using the priesthood ties all that he has been given to the expression of faith, just as a single woman/mother ties all that she has been given of the Lord to the expression of faith. It is a matter of remembering the Lord in seeking the blessing of all that we have at our disposal (in this case, a home) by all the means we have at our disposal (in this case, priesthood, Gift of the Holy Ghost, faith, etc.). The effect on the individuals giving the blessing would be different according to how they truly value the priesthood, Gift of the Holy Ghost and faith.

 

I think the same goes for a healing blessing by the power of the priesthood and a prayer asking for healing from a non-priesthood holder.

 

The only instance I can think where a priesthood blessing could have healed someone while a non-priesthood prayer would not bring about the same healing is how the one praying is using the other gifts from God (Gift of the Holy Ghost and faith), and the attitude and motive in which it was done.

 

But if someone with conferred priesthood is accessible, by all means access it, whether it is by himself, with a friend, or by calling upon someone who has it.

 

The priesthood has more authority, but faith can have just as much power, so often the results are indistinguishable.

Sealing something by power of the priesthood is authoritative and to some extent the heavens are "bound to honor" the sealing.  With faith there is no authority forcing a result, but faith in and of itself is a power and can cause a result.

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The priesthood has more authority, but faith can have just as much power, so often the results are indistinguishable.

Sealing something by power of the priesthood is authoritative and to some extent the heavens are "bound to honor" the sealing.  With faith there is no authority forcing a result, but faith in and of itself is a power and can cause a result.

Well if a Melq. Priesthood holder has to do it then there goes. All the faithful windows dedicating their houses.

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Well if a Melq. Priesthood holder has to do it then there goes. All the faithful windows dedicating their houses.

 

Hey, that's what the OP quoted from the handbook.  I'm just explaining some reasons why that would be the case.

It's too bad we don't have more records of historical dedications of things, but I know that most 19th century temples were dedicated by authority of the priesthood, and if our homes are supposed to be temples too they would require a similar dedication.

 

And I have no problem with a widow dedicating her house (especially if no priesthood holder will do it for her and if she has been endowed).

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And I have no problem with a widow dedicating her house (especially if no priesthood holder will do it for her and if she has been endowed).

 

Why does she need to be endowed to dedicate her house?

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The priesthood has more authority, but faith can have just as much power, so often the results are indistinguishable.

Sealing something by power of the priesthood is authoritative and to some extent the heavens are "bound to honor" the sealing. With faith there is no authority forcing a result, but faith in and of itself is a power and can cause a result.

Well said, and true.

I still don't see much difference in the end result, though. For the home to be truly dedicated to the Lord the people living in it must dedicate themselves and the way they live to the Lord, otherwise they were just asking the Lord to help them do it, or telling the Lord with the authority of the priesthood that they would be doing it, but without actually doing it.

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The priesthood has more authority, but faith can have just as much power, so often the results are indistinguishable.

Sealing something by power of the priesthood is authoritative and to some extent the heavens are "bound to honor" the sealing. With faith there is no authority forcing a result, but faith in and of itself is a power and can cause a result.

Well said, and true.

I still don't see much difference in the end result, though. For the home to be truly dedicated to the Lord the people living in it must dedicate themselves and the way they live to the Lord, otherwise they were just asking the Lord to help them do it, or telling the Lord with the authority of the priesthood that they would be doing it, but without actually doing it.

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The priesthood has more authority, but faith can have just as much power, so often the results are indistinguishable.

Sealing something by power of the priesthood is authoritative and to some extent the heavens are "bound to honor" the sealing. With faith there is no authority forcing a result, but faith in and of itself is a power and can cause a result.

Well said, and true.

I still don't see much difference in the end result, though. For the home to be truly dedicated to the Lord the people living in it must dedicate themselves and the way they live to the Lord, otherwise they were just asking the Lord to help them do it, or telling the Lord with the authority of the priesthood that they would be doing it, but without actually doing it.

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