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kolipoki09

Byu-Idaho Bans Skinny Jeans

47 posts in this topic

Thus far I've only seen it being enforced in the Testing Center, the place where the policy originated (according to an article published today in the Scroll). Otherwise, I don't know how else they plan to enforce it, and who draws the line between "too tight" and "too baggy."

Needless to say, I'm happy to only have a week left before graduation.

Is this going too far? Are the Pharisees alive and well?

http://thestudentreview.org/2011/12/06/byu-idaho-bans-skinny-jeans/

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Skinny jeans can be unhealthy. They can cut circulation off and actually cause numbness and other injuries that might not heal in time.

Just as a side note.

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Yep, they're alive and well. Thriving too, despite the cold this week.

I don't even know it was an issue to be honest. But I do tend to be a bit ignorant of things that go on on campus sometimes.

Edited by Gohan
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If you can see skin pores the jeans are too tight.

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I think the hard part would be trying to gauge which jeans are 'skinny' and which are just not baggy.

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It brings back some bittersweet memories of my time at Ricks/BYU-Idaho. There’s no question that the rules are strict. And I’ve always wondered why they are stricter than BYU in Provo. I’ve also wondered if some of the rules actually indirectly encourage rebellion. But I think their intentions are good. They just want to encourage modesty and moral cleanliness.

All in all, my experience there was a positive one. I would not trade it. So my advice to you, for what it’s worth, is to treasure it up as much as possible in spite of its strict rules. Soon it will all be a memory. You will have received a great education that will serve you well throughout your entire life. I hope you are able to look back on it all and smile.

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Yep, they're alive and well. Thriving too, despite the cold this week.

I don't even know it was an issue to be honest. But I do tend to be a bit ignorant of things that go on on campus sometimes.

Well, at least it will guarantee an eventful hoard of viscous letters to the editor of the Scroll during the last week of the semester (which will "conveniently" never be responded to).

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Is this going too far? Are the Pharisees alive and well?

Sometimes, someone from CES escapes and joins Student Life, an organization that by definition runs contrary to the Gospel.

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Daddy G, I think we all went through all that at one time or the other! Still I believe BYU, here Hawaii, Idaho, etc., should settle for nothing less than a moderate standard in dress codes. Let's set and keep a few examples!

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There was a big fuss in a Catholic school in Ontario.An edict came about girls wearing yoga pants.It said they must also wear a long over shirt. Apparently the LULULEMON pants are like wearing opaque panty hose.

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No ifs ands or Buttocks!

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Just so long as they include no guy's underwear showing and hopefully no pants where the crotch is down by the knees....just not attractive to look at.

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Thus far I've only seen it being enforced in the Testing Center, the place where the policy originated (according to an article published today in the Scroll). Otherwise, I don't know how else they plan to enforce it, and who draws the line between "too tight" and "too baggy."

Needless to say, I'm happy to only have a week left before graduation.

Is this going too far? Are the Pharisees alive and well?

http://thestudentrev...s-skinny-jeans/

I teach them correct principles and they govern themselves. This is a true principle. Every time we create a new law, a new policy to force individuals into obedience, we take a step away from the Savior and the plan of God and we take step closer to fulfilling the plan of Satan. At no time are leaders more foolish than in a pique of righteousness they think it best to force people to heaven.

My daughter attended to this institution for one year; it is not an institution I recommend to others.

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Sometimes, someone from CES escapes and joins Student Life, an organization that by definition runs contrary to the Gospel.

Which organization are you referring CES or Student life being contrary to the gospel

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What did the Cybermen say to the emotional human?

DELETE!

Edited by frankenstein
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http://www.byuicomm.net/blog/2011/12/07/testing-center-reminds-students-of-dress-and-grooming-standards/

Here's another article about it. The Testing Center comes off pretty bad from it. The guy from there that they interviewed was trying to make them look a bit better, but wasn't really succeeding. At least it clarifies that the enforcement is pretty much limited to there and not campus in general.

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Ladies and Gentlemen, the people have spoken and the people have won.

Just released:

Wondering if skinny jeans are allowed on campus? They are. BYU-Idaho's longstanding dress & grooming standards promote principles of modesty and restrict formfitting clothing, but skinny jeans are not singled out or prohibited. In addition, the Testing Center issue reported in Scroll has been corrected and is no longer in force.
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Well when there is a significant increase of childless couples in the Church we will know who to blame.....especially since skinny jeans are becoming popular among men as well apparently.

FWIW...

http://infertility-fertility.blogspot.com/2008/04/tight-clothes-may-affect-fertility-in.html

Men may have the same problem with tight clothing causing low sperm count, though the research is old and not solid.

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Ladies and Gentlemen, the people have spoken and the people have won.

Just released:

"Wondering if skinny jeans are allowed on campus? They are. BYU-Idaho's longstanding dress & grooming standards promote principles of modesty and restrict formfitting clothing, but skinny jeans are not singled out or prohibited. In addition, the Testing Center issue reported in Scroll has been corrected and is no longer in force.

If skinny jeans - which look horrid on a male a good on few females - are not "form fitting" then what is "form fitting"?

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It sounds like this was simply a case of an overzealous employee in the testing center, after all. But I don’t think it will stop angry accusations of an oppressive school and church, especially towards women. The damage has been done.

Edited by Sky
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It sounds like this was simply a case of an overzealous employee in the testing center, after all. But I don’t think it will stop angry accusations of an oppressive school and church, especially towards women. The damage has been done.

In the case of skinny jeans women and emo boys.

I just hope they draw the line at muffin tops.

muffintop.jpg

Edited by DaddyG
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It sounds like this was simply a case of an overzealous employee in the testing center, after all. But I don’t think it will stop angry accusations of an oppressive school and church, especially towards women. The damage has been done.

That's precisely what it was. Unfortunately, the Testing Center encourages very conservative interpretations of the Honor Code that I think miss the point all-together. The selectiveness of it all also bothers me. Male TC employees won't turn away girls with skirts well above their knees or with low-cut tops. Overall, it's a guilty until proven innocent type of attitude that I have issues with. I don't have any problem with the school's administration. I have a problem with TC employees enforcing their private interpretation of the Honor Code on students.

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What is the testing center?

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What is the testing center?

It's the place where the majority of tests for any given class are offered. Rather than having it in the classroom during class time, students take their tests any time during an established period (usually within a two-day schedule). It employs about a dozen or so people at a time constantly watching for any people suspected to be cheating, along with handing you the proper test once you come in. There are usually a hundred or so students in the Testing Center at any given time, but during finals week, that can grow to several hundred.

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