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Bill "Papa" Lee

Would You Wish To Live In A Post Apocalyptic World? “Being Prepared”.

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For all your Zombie hunting supplies: Zombie Tools: Accessories for the Apocalypse. (Disclaimer: I have nothing to do with the company except that I live in the town where they are based.

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Well since you live there, why don't you get something to do with the company! That way, the rest of us have someone on the inside montoring zombie killing accessory sales who can readily provide us with necessary equipment :)

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Well since you live there, why don't you get something to do with the company! That way, the rest of us have someone on the inside montoring zombie killing accessory sales who can readily provide us with necessary equipment :)

I've been watching for job openings.

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Oh is that all?

You mean like living in LA on any given day? ;)

X 1,000,000 squared...no it everyone everywhere.

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Yep. I'm licensed to carry.

I'm a big believer in teaching kids to shoot, too.

I bought all my children air soft guns to prepare for the impending invasion. My oldest boy asked what good plastic pellets would be since they'd just bounce off the zombies.

Ahh the naivete of childhood. LOL.

I had to reassure him that once he's as good a shot as I am, he can get 10 or 20 of those little BBs in the zombies' ears and then they'll rattle when they walk. It's an early warning system.

Kids have no imagination anymore...

Same here...

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I have worked there...

Kewl-- James O. Mason was its Director from 83-89. He later served as a Seventy, 2nd quorum. He reviewed the Church in-vitro fertilization policy back in 1982 (I was assigned to draft it as a grad student). One of a couple of my life's "brushes with fame." Or 6th degree of whatever...

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I am a member of PETA

People Eating Tasty Animals.

This one does for sure.

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How do any of you feel, would you like to live through the tribulation or just watch from heaven?

Ok, I've digressed enough (sorry). If I'm alive when the tribulation starts to come about, then I would hope the rapture would occur so I wouldn't have to live through it. However, that is just plan B; plain A is to remain faithful to Christ and endure to the end. If that means I must face the tribulation, then so be it.

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Ok, I've digressed enough (sorry). If I'm alive when the tribulation starts to come about, then I would hope the rapture would occur so I wouldn't have to live through it. However, that is just plan B; plain A is to remain faithful to Christ and endure to the end. If that means I must face the tribulation, then so be it.

Except there is no mention of the word "Rapture" in the scriptures and many "Christians" are post millennium on this issue, and many more post-tribulation as well. The entire doctrine is based on a time table found in the Book of Daniel and some misinterpretation of the book of Revelation. Maybe that is why you said you "hope", maybe you are not convinced yourself? BTW, I for one hope you are right. As long as the entire Family is with me, otherwise I will share in their fate. No matter the price. I am not willing to lose one and would never abandon any.

Edited by Pa Pa

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Except there is no mention of the word "Rapture" in the scriptures and many "Christians" are post millennium on this issue, and many more post-tribulation as well. The entire doctrine is based on a time table found in the Book of Daniel and some misinterpretation of the book of Revelation. Maybe that is why you said you "hope", maybe you are not convinced yourself?

That's not quite right. In First Thessalonians 4:17, we read of the "catching up" (or "carrying off") of the living and dead Saints. The word (ἁρπαγησόμεθα) translated "caught up" (in the AV) is translated as rapiemur in the Vulgate.

Our English word "rapture" (and "rape", as well) comes from the Middle French rapture, by way of the Middle Latin raptura ("seizure, rape, kidnapping") from Latin raptus, "a carrying off".

Lehi

Edited by LeSellers

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Except there is no mention of the word "Rapture" in the scriptures and many "Christians" are post millennium on this issue, and many more post-tribulation as well. The entire doctrine is based on a time table found in the Book of Daniel and some misinterpretation of the book of Revelation. Maybe that is why you said you "hope", maybe you are not convinced yourself? BTW, I for one hope you are right. As long as the entire Family is with me, otherwise I will share in their fate. No matter the price. I am not willing to lose one and would never abandon any.

I find evidence for the rapture in the scriptures, but it one of those issues that you can believe it or not and still be Christian; it doesn't change any doctrine, and doesn't change how we are to interact with others (in love and sharing the Gospel) nor does it change that we are to remain faithful to Christ. If it happens it happens, and if not, then it does't. All glory to God either way :)

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I find evidence for the rapture in the scriptures, but it one of those issues that you can believe it or not and still be Christian; it doesn't change any doctrine, and doesn't change how we are to interact with others (in love and sharing the Gospel) nor does it change that we are to remain faithful to Christ. If it happens it happens, and if not, then it does't. All glory to God either way :)

Like I said, I hope you are right...I studied this topic in my early ministry in the Baptist Church after being feed a steady diet of it all my life. There is too much warning given by OT Prophets and NT Apostles and Christ himself in Matthew 24 about believers need to expect. It is a false teaching within the EV Church.

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Like I said, I hope you are right...I studied this topic in my early ministry in the Baptist Church after being feed a steady diet of it all my life. There is too much warning given by OT Prophets and NT Apostles and Christ himself in Matthew 24 about believers need to expect. It is a false teaching within the EV Church.

I don't believe it's a false teaching, just that it's a non-issue.

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I don't believe it's a false teaching, just that it's a non-issue.

As I said I hope you are right, it does not mean anything to our salvation.

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In an apocalyptic world few would actually survive. It is estimated that if our infrastructure breaks down 80 to 90 percent in the industrialized would die in the first year. We are so dependent now on modern technology to just feed us that there is now way we could simply revert to being farmers or living off the land. Survivalist may last a b it longer but the food as in wild game would become so scarce in a matter of weeks that everyone would starve. What would really happen is nature would take over and when enough people had died to reach an equilibrium with available food supplies things would balance out. So unless the apocalypse lasts 3 months or less there may not be enough people left to worry about preparing for any grand return of Christ.

So if you are a believer in the second coming I think you have reject an all out apocalypse and opt for more of a political type of turmoil. There is political turmoil allthe time. It is just that the 90 percent of us who keep the world running continue to do so regardless.

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In an apocalyptic world few would actually survive. It is estimated that if our infrastructure breaks down 80 to 90 percent in the industrialized would die in the first year. We are so dependent now on modern technology to just feed us that there is now way we could simply revert to being farmers or living off the land. Survivalist may last a b it longer but the food as in wild game would become so scarce in a matter of weeks that everyone would starve. What would really happen is nature would take over and when enough people had died to reach an equilibrium with available food supplies things would balance out. So unless the apocalypse lasts 3 months or less there may not be enough people left to worry about preparing for any grand return of Christ.

So if you are a believer in the second coming I think you have reject an all out apocalypse and opt for more of a political type of turmoil. There is political turmoil allthe time. It is just that the 90 percent of us who keep the world running continue to do so regardless.

Another reason to follow the prophet's counsel and have a year's supply!

And plenty of ammo. ;)

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The topic question involves serious and very real issues, but because of the topic title I couldn't help but be reminded of Orson Scott Card's short science fiction stories in The Folk of the Fringe. I haven't had much opportunity to talk about this book with anyone, so I hope this is an appropriate place and that there is someone out there who has read the book! It's a little old, from the 1980s.

The Folk of the Fringe is centered around Mormons fleeing the wastelands--more social than environmental--of a post-apocalyptic America to a state called Deseret. This is in the future. (Card has said that these stories are just fiction, not revelatory.) The state of Deseret is again located in the vicinity of Utah. The stories show the struggles of the Mormon refugees, of other Mormons who are more settled, and of non-Mormons. In some of the stories, conversions take place.

I was little bit unprepared for this book. Parts of this collection of stories seem intended for people who are already LDS. They would be better prepared to understand the LDS ideas approached indirectly or vaguely as well as the statements about Mormons made by some non-LDS characters. But the book is inspiring.

I got from this book that living in a post-apocalyptic world would be more bearable as a Mormon. Also, some of the same problems that people face today would continue to exist after a disaster, and Mormonism would continue to be relevant and offer answers.

Being prepared for post-apocalypse would be being spiritually prepared and socially/culturally prepared, besides being prepared in terms of specific skills and know-how that anyone accustomed to non-urban living or war-torn environments might have.

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The topic question involves serious and very real issues, but because of the topic title I couldn't help but be reminded of Orson Scott Card's short science fiction stories in The Folk of the Fringe. I haven't had much opportunity to talk about this book with anyone, so I hope this is an appropriate place and that there is someone out there who has read the book! It's a little old, from the 1980s.

The Folk of the Fringe is centered around Mormons fleeing the wastelands--more social than environmental--of a post-apocalyptic America to a state called Deseret. This is in the future. (Card has said that these stories are just fiction, not revelatory.) The state of Deseret is again located in the vicinity of Utah. The stories show the struggles of the Mormon refugees, of other Mormons who are more settled, and of non-Mormons. In some of the stories, conversions take place.

I was little bit unprepared for this book. Parts of this collection of stories seem intended for people who are already LDS. They would be better prepared to understand the LDS ideas approached indirectly or vaguely as well as the statements about Mormons made by some non-LDS characters. But the book is inspiring.

I got from this book that living in a post-apocalyptic world would be more bearable as a Mormon. Also, some of the same problems that people face today would continue to exist after a disaster, and Mormonism would continue to be relevant and offer answers.

Being prepared for post-apocalypse would be being spiritually prepared and socially/culturally prepared, besides being prepared in terms of specific skills and know-how that anyone accustomed to non-urban living or war-torn environments might have.

Your observation that the Mormon culture might prepare its adherents to do better in a post apocalyptic era is probably accurate in the sense that LDS have an active organization for cooperation and social order and are encouraged to be self sufficient.

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The topic question involves serious and very real issues, but because of the topic title I couldn't help but be reminded of Orson Scott Card's short science fiction stories in The Folk of the Fringe. I haven't had much opportunity to talk about this book with anyone, so I hope this is an appropriate place and that there is someone out there who has read the book! It's a little old, from the 1980s.

The Folk of the Fringe is centered around Mormons fleeing the wastelands--more social than environmental--of a post-apocalyptic America to a state called Deseret. This is in the future. (Card has said that these stories are just fiction, not revelatory.) The state of Deseret is again located in the vicinity of Utah. The stories show the struggles of the Mormon refugees, of other Mormons who are more settled, and of non-Mormons. In some of the stories, conversions take place.

I was little bit unprepared for this book. Parts of this collection of stories seem intended for people who are already LDS. They would be better prepared to understand the LDS ideas approached indirectly or vaguely as well as the statements about Mormons made by some non-LDS characters. But the book is inspiring.

I got from this book that living in a post-apocalyptic world would be more bearable as a Mormon. Also, some of the same problems that people face today would continue to exist after a disaster, and Mormonism would continue to be relevant and offer answers.

Being prepared for post-apocalypse would be being spiritually prepared and socially/culturally prepared, besides being prepared in terms of specific skills and know-how that anyone accustomed to non-urban living or war-torn environments might have.

I read the book some years ago but as I recall the Mormons were not exactly living in some kind of utopia. It seemed more like the early days of the saints arriving in the valley and struggling just to survive. The book struck me hard in that Mormons seemed to be suffering the same fate as the rest of the country only they were doing it together as a group instead of as individuals.

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Another reason to follow the prophet's counsel and have a year's supply!

And plenty of ammo. ;)

:help::rofl:

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I read the book some years ago but as I recall the Mormons were not exactly living in some kind of utopia. It seemed more like the early days of the saints arriving in the valley and struggling just to survive. The book struck me hard in that Mormons seemed to be suffering the same fate as the rest of the country only they were doing it together as a group instead of as individuals.

The traveling Mormon characters uprooted from their homes definitely weren't living in a utopia. In Utah, conditions are better than they are elsewhere, but the state of Deseret exists in the midst of decay and menaces. Maybe no utopian project could fare better.

In the end, though, Mormonism is one of the few "European" cultures remaining on the continent.

The Mormons fleeing to Utah may actually be perceived by the reader (not just through the eyes of a non-LDS character) as naive, lacking in smarts or not cutthroat enough to survive in a post-apocalyptic world. You get the impression that in the short term, Mormons who have run out of supplies would have a harder time than others adapting in an environment where many people are stealing or even killing to survive.

However, anyone who is plucked from a city and put in those circumstances might be inept, not just non-Mormons. Also, one of the non-LDS main characters helps the refugees, so it is not just a dog-eat-dog world. There are differences. The scavenger who helps the refugees, before he is a believer, is eventually baptized. He assists the refugees, but they salvage him spiritually. Without Mormonism, he wouldn't have a reason to go to Utah, where society is progressing.

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How do any of you feel, would you like to live through the tribulation or just watch from heaven?

it if was a movie it would probably be slightly interesting... but when you realize real people (millions of them) are going to suffer greatly and die, I don't think I would "like" to be in that situation even though I would be fine and they wouldn't. Wanting to watch it from heaven takes even more sadism.

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it if was a movie it would probably be slightly interesting... but when you realize real people (millions of them) are going to suffer greatly and die, I don't think I would "like" to be in that situation even though I would be fine and they wouldn't. Wanting to watch it from heaven takes even more sadism.

Of course if "I had to see it", to qualify my comments. I understand the horror of it all.

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I consider ammunition as part of my year's supply--not only enough to sustain life, but enough to protect what we have. Mob mentality can set in very quickly and be relentless.

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Isn't another name for post-Apocalyptic world, "the millenium"? And then isn't the world going to receive its paradisiacal glory? (this was mentioned in todays Gospel Principles lesson, though I'm thinking that may not actually happen until final judgment after the millenium ends. But if Jesus will reign, the world has to have glory, so I'm thinking we are not going to live in anything like scorched earth.)

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