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thews

Your thoughts on death

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That's an interesting observation and one I hadn't thought of. I remember standing over my dead body , but I didn't look in a mirror to see if I had any clothes. If it were to happen again, what I would do is lift up a hand to see whether or not I could see it... I didn't do that either.

I agree about the airport experience. I don't make the rules, but I sort of believe that one "rule" about NDE's is that one can't go too far. Once one knows too much, then the line has been crossed and if you did go back you'd be armed with the knowledge. Infinite concepts can only be understood by infinite perspectives.

After beating bone cancer at 15 my daughter was diagnosed with leukemia three years later (3% of cancer survivors get leukemia). After a well fought battle and surviving a bone marrow transplant, the disease came back. She got worse quickly, and the last day she was alive it was my night to spend with her in the hospital. She was unconscious, and as she lay there breathing very heavily, I held her hands and prayed. when I was done I put her hands back under the cover and just started talking to her. I told her that if her experience was like mine, she'd at some point be outside of her body. I told her not to fear whatever awaited her, and that someday I'd be in the same situation and I wouldn't fear it. I then got the cot ready to go to sleep and sat back down on the bed. Her hands moved under the cover and I grabbed them... she died moments later. I didn't see her, feel her presence in the room or see anything else. What I was left with was the harsh reality that she was gone, and felt so grateful that she was my daughter and I was given the experience of being there when she left... I did feel she could hear me.

I guess the point to this is that we will all face the same music someday. Whatever we think is going to happen is going to unfold moments after it does... in a distant way I look forward to it. From my NDE experience, the first thought was fear, followed by the fact that there wasn't anything I could change. Being flawed is part of the human experience, and while some believe nothing will happen (nothing wrong with that), when it does your place in the universe is defined solely by you... it's a feeling of being very alone as you wait to see what happens next, but it's not scary... hard to put into words.

Wow! Sorry to hear of your loss, I couldn't even imagine. Thanks for sharing with us.

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That's an interesting observation and one I hadn't thought of. I remember standing over my dead body , but I didn't look in a mirror to see if I had any clothes. If it were to happen again, what I would do is lift up a hand to see whether or not I could see it... I didn't do that either.

I agree about the airport experience. I don't make the rules, but I sort of believe that one "rule" about NDE's is that one can't go too far. Once one knows too much, then the line has been crossed and if you did go back you'd be armed with the knowledge. Infinite concepts can only be understood by infinite perspectives.

After beating bone cancer at 15 my daughter was diagnosed with leukemia three years later (3% of cancer survivors get leukemia). After a well fought battle and surviving a bone marrow transplant, the disease came back. She got worse quickly, and the last day she was alive it was my night to spend with her in the hospital. She was unconscious, and as she lay there breathing very heavily, I held her hands and prayed. when I was done I put her hands back under the cover and just started talking to her. I told her that if her experience was like mine, she'd at some point be outside of her body. I told her not to fear whatever awaited her, and that someday I'd be in the same situation and I wouldn't fear it. I then got the cot ready to go to sleep and sat back down on the bed. Her hands moved under the cover and I grabbed them... she died moments later. I didn't see her, feel her presence in the room or see anything else. What I was left with was the harsh reality that she was gone, and felt so grateful that she was my daughter and I was given the experience of being there when she left... I did feel she could hear me.

I guess the point to this is that we will all face the same music someday. Whatever we think is going to happen is going to unfold moments after it does... in a distant way I look forward to it. From my NDE experience, the first thought was fear, followed by the fact that there wasn't anything I could change. Being flawed is part of the human experience, and while some believe nothing will happen (nothing wrong with that), when it does your place in the universe is defined solely by you... it's a feeling of being very alone as you wait to see what happens next, but it's not scary... hard to put into words.

Thanks for sharing too. I appreciate these stories. Very often when people have an NDE their loved ones are dismissive out of fear or the discomfort being directly confronted with our/their mortality brings. So often these NDE stories that loved ones would bring to the table are set aside owing to the reactions of the listeners. For example, in the news recently we had the story of the young boy and his angels and such. It wasn't until 4 months later did the parents really sit and talk with him.

It also a lesser known fact that people who experience very "deep" NDE's tend not to have much time left in mortality. They may well recover from the incident/illness but then there is a re-occurrence or other incident not too much later.

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I'm curious to know what you expect directly afterward once you die. Not the long term, but right afterward. You can't know, but it doesn't hurt to theorize. What is it you expect to happen directly after you die?

I don't know if my experience was a "true" NDE or not. But it had all the verisimilitude of reality. I was asleep beside my wife, when I suddenly felt "switches" shutting off all over the inside of my body; whatever dreaming I had been doing was broken by the sensation. I felt myself rapidly approaching death. At first I clenched against the sensation, and I instantly noticed that the "switches" stopped flipping off, but none of the parts of my body that had already ceased to function resumed functioning. This cessation triggered a thought: "Why am I stopping this"? So I quit resisting and let the last of the "switches" throw. Just before my body died I breathed out a "good-bye" to the back of my wife's head. Then I was gone. In an instant I discovered myself standing in an atmosphere of almost total darkness. As near as I could discern, I was upright in the midst of an endless plain of featureless rocks, most of them no larger than head size, dotting a lifeless sandy earth. There was no color, no light except the dimmest of glimmer beyond a low and monotonous horizon all around. There was no sound. Not even the slightest animation to the air. The whole "place" was as lifeless as is possible to imagine and seemed to have been as I found it for all of eternity. Turning around changed nothing. I could not tell if I was looking in a different direction. I stood there for a while wondering if anyone would come and take me away. Moving away from where I had first appeared seemed utterly pointless. There was nothing to move toward. I knew that the horizon would always remain the same. I would stumble into and over the same rocks, forever. So I stood there and waited. Nothing changed. And I decided that nothing ever would change. The thought came to me: "I am not supposed to be here". My mind returned to my bed and my sleeping wife. And I willed myself back there. In an instant I was returned to my body. I opened my eyes to the dim and familiar light on the walls and ceiling. My wife was breathing regularly in sleep, facing away from me as before. "That, was weird," I whispered to myself. And I lay there for some time contemplating how real it all felt. I decided that I had been given a prelude to how I could die when the right time came. And I still believe it. When the time comes and the "switches" start to throw, I won't resist them at all. Imho, people can die a lot sooner than they actually do: it is their choice to resist, for a time, if they choose to. But to actually participate in your own death is also on offer, if you don't refuse it.

When we die, I believe that we discover at once that our very thoughts, feelings and identity undergo a return to the immortal person we really are. Our total memories are restored; in much the same way as our empirical mind, the waking one, returns to consciousness when we wake up from dreams. I don't believe that this mortal existence is only a dream. But our immortal mind occupies this mortal place for a period of time, while our immortal bodies "sleep". Like being in two places at the same time, physically and mentally; much like dreaming feels to us after we wake up. In that sense, mortality is no more "real" than a dream. But this world is very real, empirical and no phantasm. The purpose of coming here ("being there") is to learn opposition to Joy. We are meant to be joyful creatures. But we have to know what Joy is. Therefore we must go to a place where opposition in fullness can be experienced. We come "here". But obviously we never stay, nor would any of us want to....

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