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baddonkey

Apocrypha, Pseudepigrapha, Others?

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Hi all, Nice new board!

Just am curious which non-canonical books might be your favorites. Apocryphal ones? Pseudepigraphal? Any others? Which if any do you consider to be inspired?

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Hi all, Nice new board!

Just am curious which non-canonical books might be your favorites. Apocryphal ones? Pseudepigraphal? Any others? Which if any do you consider to be inspired?

Book of Enoch 1+2

Sheppard of Hermes

Justins Dialog with Trypho the Jew

All inspired but they do contain some interpolations of man.

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The Gospel of Thomas. I consider it equal in stature to the New Testament Gospels.

Phaedrus

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The Gospel of Thomas. I consider it equal in stature to the New Testament Gospels.

Phaedrus

The Gospel of Thomas is my personal favorite since it appears to be insightful in regards to tying up a few loose ends in regards to events. OTOH, I recognize a few of the potholes (ravines at times) that you need to be very wary of IMO. It's not the same stature as the NT Gospels, but it is intriguing.

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Hi all, Nice new board!

Just am curious which non-canonical books might be your favorites. Apocryphal ones? Pseudepigraphal? Any others? Which if any do you consider to be inspired?

I've enjoyed the Apocalypse of Abraham, and the Book of Enoch.

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I was thinking about it today because my friend said to me that she thought that the Shepherd of Hermas is inspired. I know there are reasons why some of these books were rejected earlier, but I think it's okay to consider a few of them to be scripture in an unofficial sense even though they are not included in our canon right now. Maybe there are one or two that are included in our canon that are uninspired, such as Song of Solomon. Does that sound reasonable?

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name='baddonkey' timestamp='1294877455' post='1208963055']

I was thinking about it today because my friend said to me that she thought that the Shepherd of Hermas is inspired. I know there are reasons why some of these books were rejected earlier, but I think it's okay to consider a few of them to be scripture in an unofficial sense even though they are not included in our canon right now. Maybe there are one or two that are included in our canon that are uninspired, such as Song of Solomon. Does that sound reasonable?

The problem is that the Shepard of Hermas teaches Adoptionism. That is to say Christ was an ordinary mortal who was later adopted as the Son of God and made divine.

http://www.earlychristianwritings.com/text/shepherd-lightfoot.html

6[59]:5 The Holy Pre-existent Spirit. Which created the whole creation, God made to dwell in flesh that He desired. This flesh, therefore, in which the Holy Spirit dwelt, was subject unto the Spirit, walking honorably in holiness and purity, without in any way defiling the Spirit.

6[59]:6 When then it had lived honorably in chastity, and had labored with the Spirit, and had cooperated with it in everything, behaving itself boldly and bravely, He chose it as a partner with the Holy Spirit; for the career of this flesh pleased [the Lord], seeing that, as possessing the Holy Spirit, it was not defiled upon the earth.

6[59]:7 He therefore took the son as adviser and the glorious angels also, that this flesh too, having served the Spirit unblamably, might have some place of sojourn, and might not seem to hare lost the reward for its service; for all flesh, which is found undefiled and unspotted, wherein the Holy Spirit dwelt, shall receive a reward.

And see-

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Adoptionism#cite_note-36

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The problem is that the Shepard of Hermas teaches Adoptionism. That is to say Christ was an ordinary mortal who was later adopted as the Son of God and made divine.

http://www.earlychri...-lightfoot.html

And see-

http://en.wikipedia....sm#cite_note-36

When one realizes that Christs mortal body made of a woman that could die, DID have to be "adopted" just like the rest of our bodies will be it makes perfect sense.

Romans 8:23

And not only they, but ourselves also, which have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption, to wit, the redemption of our body.

Hebrews 5:9

And being made perfect, he became the author of eternal salvation unto all them that obey him;

Hebrews 9:11

But Christ being come an high priest of good things to come, by a greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say, not of this building;

Philippians 3:21

Who shall change our vile body, that it may be fashioned like unto his glorious body, according to the working whereby he is able even to subdue all things unto himself.

1 John 3

2 Beloved, now are we the sons of God, and it doth not yet appear what we shall be: but we know that, when he shall appear, we shall be like him; for we shall see him as he is.

2 Peter 1

13Yea, I think it meet, as long as I am in this tabernacle, to stir you up by putting you in remembrance;

14Knowing that shortly I must put off this my tabernacle, even as our Lord Jesus Christ hath shewed me.

Sown in corruption raised in inncoruption.

One of the arguments at Nicea went over this and explained how Christs body had to be "adopted" and that all the molecules were obsorbed into the transcendant realm. (can't find it at the moment though :P )

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When one realizes that Christs mortal body made of a woman that could die, DID have to be "adopted" just like the rest of our bodies will be it makes perfect sense.

Romans 8:23

And not only they, but ourselves also, which have the firstfruits of the Spirit, even we ourselves groan within ourselves, waiting for the adoption, to wit, the redemption of our body.

Hebrews 5:9

And being made perfect, he became the author of eternal salvation unto all them that obey him;

Hebrews 9:11

But Christ being come an high priest of good things to come, by a greater and more perfect tabernacle, not made with hands, that is to say, not of this building;

Philippians 3:21

Who shall change our vile body, that it may be fashioned like unto his glorious body, according to the working whereby he is able even to subdue all things unto himself.

1 John 3

2 Beloved, now are we the sons of God, and it doth not yet appear what we shall be: but we know that, when he shall appear, we shall be like him; for we shall see him as he is.

2 Peter 1

13Yea, I think it meet, as long as I am in this tabernacle, to stir you up by putting you in remembrance;

14Knowing that shortly I must put off this my tabernacle, even as our Lord Jesus Christ hath shewed me.

Sown in corruption raised in inncoruption.

One of the arguments at Nicea went over this and explained how Christs body had to be "adopted" and that all the molecules were obsorbed into the transcendant realm. (can't find it at the moment though :P )

Interesting-- but the idea of 'Molecules" in 425 A.D. ?

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Enochian literature is fun, and so is some of the Gnostic stuff. Inspiration wise, Gospel of Philip, Gospel of Thomas, Gospel of the Savior, and the Hymn of the Pearl are on my list. The Qur'an is also a good one. And maybe the Apocalypse of Abraham.

Things I don't like: Clementine letters/homilies and the Shepherd of Hermas (boring), Barnabas and the Apocalypse of Peter (too fiery), along with the infancy Gospels and later apostolic Acts (too out there).

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[quote

When one realizes that Christs mortal body made of a woman that could die, DID have to be "adopted" just like the rest of our bodies will be it makes perfect sense.]

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Most of my picks have already been mentioned: The Gospel of Thomas, Hymn of the Pearl, The Apocalypse of Abraham, Enoch 1 and 2. I would add the book of Thomas the Contender, The Gospel of Mary and my favorite, the Apocryphon of James.

I would agree that 1 Clement is a bit boring, but in the same way as reading a conference talk is boring.

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