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David Bokovoy

Rising From the Dust

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Iâ??ve discussed this issue in brief via that infamous collection of filthy propaganda which at least currently spews its evil vile under the title The FARMS Review, but while reading the Book of Mormon today, I came across another interesting way of considering the issue.

Thought I would share with the board.

One of the classic biblical themes presented throughout the Book of Mormon includes the notion of rising from the dust. This Book of Mormon admonition reflects the account of manâ??s creation described in Genesis 2:7. The imagery of rising from the dust held con-

siderable meaning for Lehi, who, following his initial admonition in 2 Nephi 1:21, continued the theme: â??Shake off the chains with which ye are bound, and come forth out of obscurity, and arise from the dustâ? (2 Nephi 1:23).

Lehiâ??s repetitive invitation reflects the use of creation imagery in the Old Testament. In an important study devoted to an analysis of this motif, biblical scholar Walter Brueggemann has illustrated that the Bible features a connection between rising from the dust and enthronement. â??To be taken â??from the dust,â? he notes, â??means to be elevated from obscurity to royal office and to return to dust means to be deprived of that office and returned to obscurityâ? (see Walter Brueggemann, â??From Dust to Kingship,â? Zeitschrift f

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Margaret Barker said:

The knowledge which the fallen angels used to corrupt the earth was scientific knowledge, but used in a particular way. They taught about metalworking and how to make weapons, they taught about medicines and how to abort a foetus, they taught about jewellery and cosmetics and the arts of seduction. They abused women. They taught astrology. The traditional commentary on this material, preserved in the Ethiopic version of the Book of Enoch, says that the fallen angels turned men into animals â?? but this is not what it seems. In temple tradition, angel beings were described as â??menâ?? and human beings as â??animalsâ?? â?? familiar to us in the parable of the sheep and the goats. What the fallen angels did, when they turned men into animals, was turn angels into humans. This is the story in Genesis 3; Adam and Eve, created as the image of God, were condemned to mortality because they chose the knowledge of the fallen angels. They chose to be creatures of dust.

...

The Hebrew storyteller described the world outside Eden as a place of thorns, thistles and dust, whereas Eden has been a place of water and fertility. Throughout the biblical narratives, water is a symbol of the presence of God and of right teaching, and so polluted water can be a powerful symbol when preaching about the environment. In Hebrew, â??rainâ?? and â??teachingâ?? are the same word. The rivers of Eden were symbols of Wisdom and the Spirit, and so a world without Wisdom was described as a desert without water. Isaiah described waters springing up in the desert as the glory of the Lord returned (Isa.35). Ezekiel described the river which flowed from the temple and transformed the desert (Ezek.37). These were all symbols of Wisdom. The Book of Enoch, no longer in our canon, was Scripture for the first Christians. It describes the time of the Messiah, when fountains of Wisdom would flow around the throne of God, and Wisdom would be poured out like water in the holy of holies, so that the thirsty could drink (1 Enoch 48,49). This is why Jesus stood in the temple on the last day of the feast of Tabernacles, when there was a water pouring ritual to pray for rain, and invited people to drink from him (John 7). The evangelist explained that this was the gift of the Spirit, the gift of Wisdom. This was Eden restored, and so St John saw the river of life flowing from the throne of God in the heavenly city (Rev.22).

Thank you David, the "arise out of the dust and be men" has always be a power scripture to me and now it means even more. Also, and maybe I'm reading too much into it, in the old visions, human beings were often represented as animals and angels and other heavenly beings were represented as men.

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I've discussed this issue in brief via that infamous collection of filthy propaganda which at least currently spews its evil vile under the title The FARMS Review, but while reading the Book of Mormon today, I came across another interesting way of considering the issue.

Thought I would share with the board.

One of the classic biblical themes presented throughout the Book of Mormon includes the notion of rising from the dust. This Book of Mormon admonition reflects the account of man's creation described in Genesis 2:7. The imagery of rising from the dust held con-

siderable meaning for Lehi, who, following his initial admonition in 2 Nephi 1:21, continued the theme: "Shake off the chains with which ye are bound, and come forth out of obscurity, and arise from the dust" (2 Nephi 1:23).

Hi David...good to hear from you again.

I was impressed with this as well a few months ago, although I didn't connect it with the Book of Mormon. There are similar concepts in the death of Abel by Cain where the "blood of Abel" is crying from the earth. On some search I found the following...

But in the Biblical narrative of the murder of Abel the blood of the murdered man is not the only

inanimate object that is personified. If the blood is represented as crying aloud, the earth is represented as opening her mouth to receive the blood of the victim. To this personification of the earth Aeschylus offers a parallel,

for he speaks of the ground drinking the blood of the murdered Agamemnon. But in Genesis the attribution of personal qualities to the earth seems to be carried a step further, for we are told that the murderer was "cursed from

the ground"; and that when he tilled it, the land would not yield him her strength, but that a fugitive and a wanderer should he be in the world. The implication apparently is that the earth, polluted by blood and offended by his

crime, would refuse to allow the seed sown by the murderer to germinate and bear fruit; nay, that it would expel him from the cultivated soil on which he had hitherto prospered, and drive him out into the barren wilderness, there to

roam a houseless and hungry vagabond. The conception of earth as a personal being, who revolts against the sin of the dwellers upon it and spurns them from her bosom, is not foreign to the Old Testament. In Leviticus we read that,

defiled by human iniquity, "the land vomiteth out her inhabitants"; and the Israelites are solemnly warned to keep God's statutes and judgments, "that the land vomit not you out also, when ye defile it, as it vomited

out the nation that was before you."

Folklore in the Old Testament: Studies in Comparative Religion Legend and Law 1918, Sir James Frazer.

I also think it is interesting that the Enuma Elish discusses the fusing of earth and god blood to make a human.

]Thanks for your always interesting comments. More, please!

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Fascinating topic to me. I really should be working on my blog instead of hanging out here, but let me quote myself:

“LDS Transformational Theology” is my metaphysical view that “eternal progression” implies that God through the advancement of his creation, is always changing, and directing the transformation of the universe through his creations and his children.

This divinely directed transformational change causes the development of living things to “swim upstream” against entropy, and is evident in the ever more complex development of his creatures over time.

Another way of saying this, is that the history of the universe manifests God’s directing hand in moving from “matter unorganized” to the creation of “God-stuff”; one example of this process can be seen in the formation of humanity. Paul in the New Testament speaks of “bodies celestial” as the manifestation of our greatest human potential. These bodies with this mature potential were formed from matter which was once “unorganized”, and which matter is, following the resurrection, transformed into celestialized human bodies. We believe that the earth itself will one day undergo such a transformation.

In human lives, this transformation is manifest in the maxim “the natural man is an enemy to God”, representing the beginning of our spiritual journey. As we move forward on this journey, we seek to transform our lives from the carnal “state of nature” (”matter unorganized”) to a celestial state, by the grace of the transforming and healing power of Jesus Christ, “after all we can do”.

This view can be understood on many levels from a spiritual understanding of the origin of species and how the vast panorama of life relates to eschatology, to using concrete methods and techniques to enable us to transform our habits to “come unto Christ.”

This view implies that God adds to his glory through his creation, and in a real sense, by creating his creations, is in some sense re-creating himself.

This is also manifest in LDS ordinances in a symbolic way. As we become “one flesh” as members of the body of Christ and “one flesh” in the state of celestial marriage, we again participate in our father’s creative process of becoming like him physically as well as spiritually.

http://mfbukowski.wordpress.com/

But this idea of rising from the dust is central to this.

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Iâ??ve discussed this issue in brief via that infamous collection of filthy propaganda which at least currently spews its evil vile under the title The FARMS Review, but while reading the Book of Mormon today, I came across another interesting way of considering the issue.

Very interesting. I find subtle connections like this one to be most impressive.

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...the use of dust in King Benjaminâ??s sermon provides evidence for an extremely subtle biblical/Book of Mormon connection.

Hi David. Haven't seen you around for a while. There was a fun thread just last week regarding on Consiglieri's statement that explicit KJV-BoM connections are damning evidence against the BoM. It made think of you and your interests.

I find subtle connections like this one to be most impressive.

Why are subtle connections most impressive instead of least impressive? Apparently they have some aesthetic-emotional value that only translates between already-believers.

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Why are subtle connections most impressive instead of least impressive? Apparently they have some aesthetic-emotional value that only translates between already-believers.

A wordy way of saying, I'm not impressed. :P

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Thanks for the insight, David.

One of the things that makes this connection of interest is that Lehi is not simply quoting from the Bible. The closest parallel to this phrase is in Isaiah, and says something different.

Isa. 52: 2--Shake thyself from the dust; arise, and sit down, O Jerusalem: loose thyself from the bands of thy neck, O captive daughter of Zion.

Here Isaiah does not say to "arise from the dust," but to "Shake thyself from the dust; arise, and sit down." Although the original in Hebrew may have a different meaning, reading it in English I have always thought it to refer to somebody simply sitting on the ground and getting dirty, who is told to shake off the dust, arise and sit down.

I confess this has never made much sense to me, because I had thought the person was already sitting; and yet if that were the case, "Jerusalem" is told to shake off the dust (before standing), stand up, and sit down again, which seems rather pointless. I mean, if "Jerusalem" can shake off the dust while sitting down, why the bother of standing only to sit down once more?

David's insight gives this passage more meaning, I think.

And if this is the correct understanding of the passage in the original Hebrew, it seems that Moroni understood it in the same way:

Moro. 10: 31--And awake, and arise from the dust, O Jerusalem; yea, and put on thy beautiful garments, O daughter of Zion; and strengthen thy stakes and enlarge thy borders forever, that thou mayest no more be confounded, that the covenants of the Eternal Father which he hath made unto thee, O house of Israel, may be fulfilled.

Could this be an instance of the Book of Mormon altering an Isaiah quote from the KJV in such a way as to more accurately convey the meaning of the underlying Hebrew?

What do you think?

All the Best!

--Consiglieri

P.S. Ron Beron's quote from the paper dealing with geo-personification, though less than pellucid in the Bible, finds corroboration in the Book of Moses:

Moses 7:48--And it came to pass that Enoch looked upon the earth; and he heard a voice from the bowels thereof, saying: Wo, wo is me, the mother of men; I am pained, I am weary, because of the wickedness of my children. When shall I rest, and be cleansed from the filthiness which is gone forth out of me? When will my Creator sanctify me, that I may rest, and righteousness for a season abide upon my face?

And here, may I add that David's insight made the bolded part click for me just now? The filthiness that has gone out of the earth refers to wicked mankind, but the fact the earth states it has "gone forth out of me" surely refers to the initial creation of man "from the dust of the earth."

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pellucid

pellucid???? Now....you kent be usin them thar big wordys aroun here.

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Thanks David. These little nuggets always remind of John Welch's observation that as the years tick by we just keep discovering things about the BoM.

Lehi's admonition to his sons to "arise from the dust" was on my mission plaque. It was a powerful passage for me in my late teens.

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Hi David. Haven't seen you around for a while. There was a fun thread just last week regarding on Consiglieri's statement that explicit KJV-BoM connections are damning evidence against the BoM. It made think of you and your interests.

Why are subtle connections most impressive instead of least impressive? Apparently they have some aesthetic-emotional value that only translates between already-believers.

Hello the Dude,

Indeed, haven't been around for a while. I've passed through a long period of restructuring, reformulating, rethinking, reevaluating, my paradigms and even interests. I've emerged as a Born-Again, non-traditional, non-fundamentalist Mormon with a primary interest in unconditional love, if that makes any sense.

I was actually thinking about you yesterday. I attended a Harvard Chaplaincy meeting where my friend the Humanist Chaplain gave a summary of his forthcoming book through HarperCollins entitled Good Without God. Its not nearly the attack on religion that we've witnessed in recent publications, but rather an introduction to the moral and ethical values embraced by humanists.

I shared with him that in light of the fact that I have a number of friends who have become non-religious, and yet are very good people who seem to miss that sense of community that they once enjoyed via their religious tradition that I'm especially grateful for his efforts to create a sense of community amongst good non-believers.

I'm sure the book will eventually become a New York Times best seller. It's the type of thing I think you will enjoy.

I shared with him that as a religious person, I recognize that he was indeed good without God, but of course from my perspective he could be even better with him.

best

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I'm going to take *everyone's* comments on this thread, and turn it into a research paper for my blog. Go ahead and sue me if you all want to, but I'm going to do this anyway. ALL KINDS of ideas have rocketed through my cranium with these keen little insights, so I am going to turn them all into one gigantic huge FEAST. YEAH BABY! Great to see you again Brer Bokovoy. Ya know, I am usually bragging on you in my vids on You Tube.

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While the biblical concept of returning to the dust from which we were taken would have been an extremely popular motif to 19th century Americans, the use of dust in King Benjamin's sermon provides evidence for an extremely subtle biblical/Book of Mormon connection. By specifically linking dust with kingship, Mosiah 2:26 provides yet another impressive tie between the cultural/religious traditions of ancient Israel and the Book of Mormon.

I have to thank David for getting me off my keyster and doing some actual studying. I checked out a few more sources and found this interesting tidbit in Myth, Ritual, and Kingship: Essays on the Theory and Practice of Kingship in the Ancient Near East and in Israel by S. H. Hooke; Clarendon Press, 1958

There also comes forth from the ground a river or a source of water, ēḏ, watering the whole surface of the earth, aḏɑ + ̄mɑ + ̄h. Then Yahweh formed earthly Man, ɑ + ̄ḏɑ + ̄m, out of earth,aḏɑ + ̄mɑ + ̄h, as dust, 'ap + ̄ar. This statement with its play upon ɑ + ̄ḏɑ + ̄m and aḏɑ + ̄mɑ + ̄h indicates that Man was fashioned by God from the red dry particles of earth, aḏɑ + ̄mɑ + ̄h meaning the red arable soil. 1

No surprises here, but he continues...

Now this pun takes us of course back to Canaan, where we find ɑ + ̄ḏɑ ̄m not only as the designation of mankind but also as the name of a deity of earth, 2 and where in the RS texts El is called ab ɑ + ̄ḏɑ + ̄m, as was indicated above. 3 This manner of creating mankind by fashioning a being out of the dust of earth is a well-known theme in Mesopotamian mythology 4 and we are taken back once more to Mesopotamian mythical stories, at the same time clearly discerning the specific Canaanite colour of the narrative in Genesis ii f.

Here it is made clear that we are made, at least according to Ugartic literature, from the body of the deity of the Earth. Further Philo of Alexandria continues this thought equating Adam with the kingship of this earth. In the book The Tree of Souls the authors, Howard Schwartz, Caren Loebel-Fried, Elliot K. Ginsburg assert that God intended man to rule the earth while God ruled the Heavens hence, the comment, "Now the man has become like one of us." (page 125)

More on this theme was discussed by George Widengren in Early Hebrew Myths And Their Interpretation.:

While one tradition (Gen. i. 26) considers this Primordial Man the image of God, another statement (Gen. ii. 7), which we have just mentioned, says that Yahweh breathed into him His breath of life. At any rate the connexion between God and Primordial Man is very intimate and we may find here a faint trace of the original Canaanite idea according to which El was the father of Adam, Mankind. Primordial Man would then be entitled to be called the Son of God, as has been noted already. We saw that for this mythical conception a ritual association was found in so far as the king was looked upon as a living incarnation or representative of this Primordial Man. Now, certain hints in both Ugaritic and Old Testament texts would seem to indicate that the ruler as son of the godhead was given the special designation of 'firstborn', cf. Ps. lxxxix. 28, where God gives the following proclamation concerning David:

I shall put him as the

Firstborn, as the Highest one for the kings of earth.

Again, thanks David, for renewing the life on these boards.

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I'm going to take *everyone's* comments on this thread, and turn it into a research paper for my blog. Go ahead and sue me if you all want to, but I'm going to do this anyway. ALL KINDS of ideas have rocketed through my cranium with these keen little insights, so I am going to turn them all into one gigantic huge FEAST. YEAH BABY! Great to see you again Brer Bokovoy. Ya know, I am usually bragging on you in my vids on You Tube.

I am already standing in line...

BTW, didn't you already address this somewhat in "Man From the Dust? Another Look at the Meaning of the Hebrew Word rpf(f"?

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I am already standing in line...

BTW, didn't you already address this somewhat in "Man From the Dust? Another Look at the Meaning of the Hebrew Word rpf(f"?

Yes I did..... sharp eye there cowboy. Oh and hey, at least give me a page number on your last post! I can use that in my paper also. THANKS man yer a gem of a guy!

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Yes I did..... sharp eye there cowboy. Oh and hey, at least give me a page number on your last post! I can use that in my paper also. THANKS man yer a gem of a guy!

No problem. Better here's the link. After reading through his transcription I realized I already had the book.

http://phoenixandturtle.net/excerptmill/Hooke.htm

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Hey! That's a GREAT link! Thanks. I shall have al of the collective "our" essay up later this afternoon.

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I've emerged as a Born-Again, non-traditional, non-fundamentalist Mormon with a primary interest in unconditional love, if that makes any sense.

Not perfect sense. Can you expound on that?

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Lord "My brain leaves the rest of yours in the dust" Kerry, what fonts are you using in your document. I put it in a Word doc and the fonts changed.

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Hey all. Here is my dressing up and adding teeth into this wonderful discussion about BOFM dust by our Brer Bokovoy! Woo hoo! Enjoy it.....

http://www.backyardprofessor.com/files/bokovoy.pdf

Good stuff! Thanks for this!

Here's another one for you: what about the NT passages where Jesus uses some spittle, makes mud, and restores the sight of someone born blind from birth? Another "re-creation" perhaps of organs that were never there before?

To me the Isaiah passage means to "shake off the dust" and "sit on your throne" which fits perfectly with both your understanding that the BOM passage having a correct understanding and re-statement of the passage and is thus another "BOM Bullseye"

That interpretation of course also includes the idea of rising from the dust, sitting on a throne and becoming a ruler/god, or as the BOM understands it, putting on beautiful garments-putting on garments as a symbol, often mean "putting on flesh" - so here is another BOM Bullseye- the most obvious example of this on the NT side being the greek for Chapter 1 of John, where the savior "tents himself" in flesh.

So the BOM bullseyes are:

1- it restates the Isaiah, using different words and then

2- it precisely gets the hebrew metaphor of putting on garments as putting on flesh! Cool stuff!

To me the most interesting part of all this is the implications for the theology of evolution- which is of course the idea that God is adding to his glory through his transforming dust to "god-stuff"

I've been working on this now for years and years from a "big picture" perspective, but it's great to see some real scholarship that ties it down to chapters and verses in the orignal languages. A scholar I ain't! Not much of an internet guy either, so I have a lot to learn.

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Good stuff! Thanks for this!Here's another one for you: what about the NT passages where Jesus uses some spittle, makes mud, and restores the sight of someone born blind from birth? Another "re-creation" perhaps of organs that were never there before?To me the Isaiah passage means to "shake off the dust" and "sit on your throne" which fits perfectly with both your understanding that the BOM passage having a correct understanding and re-statement of the passage and is thus another "BOM Bullseye"That interpretation of course also includes the idea of rising from the dust, sitting on a throne and becoming a ruler/god, or as the BOM understands it, putting on beautiful garments-putting on garments as a symbol, often mean "putting on flesh" - so here is another BOM Bullseye- the most obvious example of this on the NT side being the greek for Chapter 1 of John, where the savior "tents himself" in flesh.So the BOM bullseyes are:1- it restates the Isaiah, using different words and then 2- it precisely gets the hebrew metaphor of putting on garments as putting on flesh! Cool stuff! To me the most interesting part of all this is the implications for the theology of evolution- which is of course the idea that God is adding to his glory through his transforming dust to "god-stuff"I've been working on this now for years and years from a "big picture" perspective, but it's great to see some real scholarship that ties it down to chapters and verses in the orignal languages. A scholar I ain't! Not much of an internet guy either, so I have a lot to learn.
DUDE! This is ***GREAT!!!!*** I can already see that I posted too soon. I shall have to revize this. THANKS for the ideas, yer awesome. Of couse, all this is our beloved David's fault - GRIN!
Lord "My brain leaves the rest of yours in the dust" Kerry, what fonts are you using in your document. I put it in a Word doc and the fonts changed.
My dear "I got more brains hidden and ain't tellin no one" Urroner. The fonts come directly out of my Bibleworks 5.0 program. The only reason they show up in the paper is because I made a pdf file of it, otherwise Word won't show the fonts correctly either. It drives me NUTS I tells ya! I wish they would all just coordinate so we can use their fonts in one easy step.

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My dear "I got more brains hidden and ain't tellin no one" Urroner. The fonts come directly out of my Bibleworks 5.0 program. The only reason they show up in the paper is because I made a pdf file of it, otherwise Word won't show the fonts correctly either. It drives me NUTS I tells ya! I wish they would all just coordinate so we can use their fonts in one easy step.

Kerry, that fonts are here http://www.bibleworks.com/fonts.html Download them and follow the instructions and the fonts appear on the screen.

BTW, this is a great thread!

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