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bluebell

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About bluebell

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    Creates Worlds Without Number
  • Birthday 10/26/1976

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    Female
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    wyoming

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  1. bluebell

    Circumcision

    Ok.
  2. bluebell

    Circumcision

    What culture binds doctors to perform circumcision on geriatric patients who are dealing with severe complications concerning their foreskins? As far as I know, America doesn't have a culture of adult circumcision.
  3. bluebell

    Who is a widow supposed to marry...?

    "God will work it out" doesn't help Lola at all right now, though who wants to remarry an active believing member of the church but can't find any that are willing to forego the blessings of being sealed to a spouse in the here and now. So while you see that answer as 'the only answer', in terms of Lola's predicament, it's not really an answer at all.
  4. bluebell

    Circumcision

    I'm not sure what you want me to say? That my mother (and her patients, which I knew personally) were lying? That the doctors who ordered the procedures were incompetent? Not being snarky, I just really don't know how you are expecting your experience to invalidate mine? I understand that my experience doesn't match your's but my mother has been a nurse for 30 years, has worked in med surge, home health/hospice/nursing home, the ER, ICU for head injuries (I don't remember what that label was), urgent care, and now triages for a doctor. The two patients I am speaking specifically about were a home health patients. They became good friends with my mother and she had them over for dinner with the family and and other events. Based on the CDC recommendations. Yes, but you haven't established that all cultural medical practices are unethical, so the existence of some does not establish anything in regards to a specific practice.
  5. bluebell

    How was two hour church?

    You must live in the South?
  6. bluebell

    Circumcision

    The article I linked to was from 2017 and I see that most of these critiques are from before. Are there any good critiques of the 2017 CDC recommendation? This is one of the references for the CDC, that discusses where some of the benefits/risk data came from. Are you saying that the 140 journal articles used to attain the data was from Sub-Saharan Africa? (Asking to make sure I understand what you are saying). This is what the CDC article says about the use of Sub-Saharan African data- The evidence shows the CDC is correct in concluding that findings from sub-Saharan Africa concerning circumcision of adult males for protection against heterosexually-acquired HIV and certain other STIs also apply to men in the United States. The findings also apply to boys when they grow up. Moreover, the cumulative lifetime benefit is greatest if circumcision is performed early in infancy since early infant circumcision is simpler, more convenient, and carries lower risk than when performed later, and circumcision confers immediate protection against urinary tract infections, phimosis, balanitis, and, when older, specific STIs and genital cancers. MC also protects the female partners, as confirmed in randomized controlled trials. Arguments by MC opponents disputing the validity of the large African RCTs showing that MC provides substantial protection against heterosexually-acquired HIV infection have been exposed as fallacious.60–72Frisch and Earp instead question the CDC for applying the African trial findings to the United States. Although the proportion of HIV infections acquired heterosexually in the United States is far less than in sub-Saharan Africa, in some U.S. localities heterosexually-acquired HIV incidence is high. Furthermore, 2014 CDC figures show 24% of new HIV infections in the United States involved heterosexual contact.73It was estimated that if all boys in the 2011 annual U.S. male birth cohort were circumcised, 5,530 HIV infections would be prevented over their lifetime.74 Lifetime risk of HIV diagnosis in heterosexual males in the United States is currently 1 in 524.75 The increase in HIV infections in African-Americans, in particular, has been faster than in all other groups.76 Modeling by the CDC found MC could reduce heterosexual HIV risk by approximately 21% in African-Americans and by approximately 12% in Hispanics, and costs would be saved in each group.77 Actual MC-related risk reduction in heterosexual African-American men with known HIV exposure was 51%. Comparison of HIV and MC prevalence in high-income countries also suggest MC has a protective effect, providing further support to the applicability of the African MC trials to the United States and other high-income countries. For example, HIV prevalence in the mostly uncircumcised populations of France and the Netherlands was much higher than in Israel where almost all men are circumcised, despite all other risk factors being comparable.79 In Australia, where MC is less common than in the United States and Israel, the number of HIV infections related to heterosexual contact has increased by 28% over the past decade, representing 25% of new diagnoses in 2013, 29% being in Australian-born patients.80 In Canada, where infant MC prevalence has, like in Australia, declined in recent decades, 9.5% of new HIV infections involve men infected heterosexually.81 As well as substantial protection against HIV, data from the African RCTs reinforced the ability of MC to protect against several other STIs in heterosexual males,10,11,13,16,71,82–90 as well as their female sex partners10,91–95 and among MSM who are insertive-only.96–100 With regard to MSM in particular, a Cochrane analysis of MC and HIV prevalence among MSM found results were statistically significant among 3,465 men in 7 studies reporting an insertive role (odds ratio, 0.27; 95% confidence interval, 0.17 to 0.44; I2=0%), but were not significant among 1,792 men in 3 studies reporting a receptive role (odds ratio, 1.20; 95% confidence interval, 0.63 to 2.29; I2 = 0%).”1,80 MC also reduces the risk of potentially fatal penile, prostate, and cervical cancer.10,16–18,101–104 Partial protection against prostate cancer incidence was seen in U.S.101 and Canadian103 studies and in a meta-analysis of all studies,104 the protective effect being strongest (36%101 and 60%103) in North American men of African heritage.
  7. bluebell

    Circumcision

    Yes, I have.
  8. bluebell

    Circumcision

    But the CDC article rebuts Frisch and Earp's claims and findings. Where can I see their rebut of the rebuttal?
  9. bluebell

    Circumcision

    I really don't know. But it doesn't seem valid to dismiss this report, which states "the CDC has a mandate to use the best available evidence to inform the public on interventions for disease prevention. In the case of early infant MC, there are few public health interventions in which the scientific evidence in favor is now so compelling," as group think and a parroted document.
  10. bluebell

    Circumcision

    Not at all. One of the reasons that I circumcised my boys was because of my mother's experience (as a nurse) caring for older males who had to be circumcised due to health problems and how horrible the process and recovery was for them. That, coupled with the medical information that I had back then and have recently read, cause me to feel good about my decision. I think that it can be said to be medical beneficial, and has been said to be that by doctors. Also, the 2017 study by the CDC refutes the idea that the risks are immeasurable. But to answer your question on culture and ethics, I think you would have to prove that it's unethical for a parent to make medical decisions for their children based on culture. I don't necessarily disagree with that, but neither do I believe it's a given like you do. Did DAC have something to say about the 2017 CDC report. I think that would be interesting to read.
  11. bluebell

    Circumcision

    Have studies done by the World Health Organization and the CDC agreed with the AAP, that the benefit was greater than the risk? From what I've read, the CDC said (in 2017) that it is measurable and that data shows that the benefit is greater than the risk by 100:1.
  12. bluebell

    How was two hour church?

    Wow, that is kind of wimpy. When we lived in North Dakota I had to call the bishop at 6:30 in the morning to see if I still needed to drive the 20 minutes into church for Ward Council and he wasn't sure yet and had to call me back, and that was when we had 22 inches of snow and it was still snowing.
  13. No, I was making a comparison of Remini and Reel as vocal critics of an organization. I wasn't saying anything about the validity of their criticism.
  14. bluebell

    Circumcision

    The follow up AAP article seems to say the same thing as the original. Both say “the procedure’s benefits justify access to this procedure for families who choose it,” and “health benefits are not great enough to recommend routine circumcision.” What did the AAP admit in the 2016 report that was absent in the 2012? (Sincere question). As to the cultural question, I really don't know. I would say that having a child circumcised just because we think it looks better would be wrong, but I would consider that to be a separate issue from doing it for cultural reasons.
  15. bluebell

    Circumcision

    I wasn't actually talking about equivocation. I was just saying that though many people believe it is unethical (and argue that), that doesn't make it so. Different opinions exist and reasonable (and knowledgable people) disagree.
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