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Rajah Manchou

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About Rajah Manchou

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    Separates Water & Dry Land

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  1. Rajah Manchou

    The Name of the Church

    I think I'm just going to call it "The Only True and Living Church Upon the Face of the Whole Earth" from now on. D&C 1:30
  2. Rajah Manchou

    The Name of the Church

    I've already referred to the style guide a few times to get the preferred usage right. I don't think I'm the only one. Not saying it won't become more natural with time, but I doubt most members, and non-members, will get it correct without referring to the style guide at least once or twice. Most just aren't going to do that.
  3. Rajah Manchou

    The Name of the Church

    The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (hyphen) had their registration of the name rejected because the polygamous group was already legally registered as The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (no hyphen). So really the polygamous group was infringing on the trademark of the Strangites who were already registered as The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (no hyphen). To defend against violation of the hyphenated name by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints Inc., The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints had to claim that the non-hyphenated version, which is actually the trademark of the official Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (Strangites), was too similar to the hyphenated version. 🤔
  4. Rajah Manchou

    The Name of the Church

    Did you have to refer to the style guide once, or twice, to assure your comment was in full compliance?
  5. Rajah Manchou

    The Name of the Church

    Growing up in the middle of the Bible Belt, the Joseph F. Smith story was one of those that always stuck with me: "One day when the company had stopped to camp and rest, a group of troublemakers came storming through. Most of the men ran and hid, but [Joseph F. Smith] decided he had nothing to be afraid of, so he continued the task of piling firewood in the camp. As he did so, one of the men approached him with a pistol, declaring that it was his duty to exterminate every Mormon he came in contact with. As he pointed his pistol at Joseph, he demanded, “Are you a Mormon?” Without fear or hesitation, Joseph answered, “Yes siree; dyed in the wool; true blue, through and through.” I don't know, the term has always held spiritual and symbolic significance for me. Spinning things now to make it seem as if it never did, is too awkward.
  6. Rajah Manchou

    The Name of the Church

    Door approaches back in my day went something like "Hi. We're missionaries for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints", using the full name, which in French comes across kinda apocalyptic: "The Church of Jesus Christ of the Saints of the Last Days". But still, we wouldn't introduce ourselves as Mormons. We avoided the term Mormon because there was an infamous local splinter cult that called themselves Mormons, and they did their baptisms in the nude. Either way, door approaches were always awkward.
  7. Rajah Manchou

    The Name of the Church

    Hah. Creation Date: 2018-08-17 2:33:10 membersofthechurchofjesuschristoflatter-daysaintsdialogue.com is still available Going once.. going twice...
  8. Rajah Manchou

    The Name of the Church

    Mormon church sues leader of B.C. polygamous sect for trademark infringement
  9. Rajah Manchou

    The Name of the Church

    You are identifying them as a "schismatic break-off group from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints". They do not identify themselves in this way. Haven't they always used "The Church of Jesus Christ" as their legal and official name? I believe they are legally registered as such with an active trademark on the name. Not to say the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints couldn't use the shortened form, but they'll have to share.
  10. Rajah Manchou

    The Name of the Church

    "Hello, we are missionaries from the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and we would like to share a message from the Book of the Devil's Gate with you. May we come in?"
  11. Rajah Manchou

    The Name of the Church

    Not according to their FAQ: Q. If you believe in The Book of Mormon, doesn't that make you a Mormon? A. If someone believes in the Old Testament, that does not automatically make that person a Jew. Similarly, if someone believes in the Bible, that does not mean that person is a Catholic, Baptist, or Pentacostal. The Church of Jesus Christ has no affiliation or connection with Mormonism. Many aspects of Mormon Doctrine are not supported by The Book of Mormon nor are they part of our beliefs.
  12. Rajah Manchou

    The Name of the Church

    membersofthechurchofjesuschristoflatter-daysaintsdialogue.org is available. should we all chip in? https://www.namecheap.com/domains/registration/results.aspx?domain=membersofthechurchofjesuschristoflatter-daysaintsdialogue.org
  13. Rajah Manchou

    Why Not Engage the Evidence for Historicity?

    Joseph Smith was Irish, descended from the Mor King Niall, a 5th century king of Ireland. 17th century Irish historians like Geoffrey Keating pulled from earlier Irish sources like the Lebor Gabala Erenn to trace the lineage of these "Mor" kings to Egypt, via Scythia and Taprobane (Malay Archipelago). Texts like the Lebor Gabal Erenn drew from even older texts. At least three 5th century Christian works seem to have had a significant bearing on the formation of LGE: St Augustine's The City of God, (413–426 AD) Orosius's Historiae adversum paganos, (417 AD) Eusebius's Chronicon, translated into Latin by St Jerome as the Temporum liber (379 AD) Why? Because 17th century Irish historians like Geoffrey Keating were trying to "provide the Irish with a written history comparable to that which the Israelites provided for themselves in the Old Testament. Drawing upon the pagan myths of Gaelic Ireland but reinterpreting them in the light of Judeo-Christian theology and historiography...Biblical paradigms provided the mythologers with ready-made stories which could be adapted to their purpose." 300 to 400 pages of Keating's work turns up in manuscript form, written in classical Irish and a mysterious Latin shorthand, under the home of Colonel Edwards, a business associate of Steven Mack. Another manuscript of Keating's History of Ireland turns up in a cave in Sandusky, New York in 1824. If speculative Biblical histories describing the migrations of Joseph Smith's ancestry from the son of an Egyptian Princess --> Defrobani (Taprobane) --> Ireland were floating around New York and Michigan in the 17th century, I could imagine the Book of Mormon narrative following a similar path from Egypt to Cumorah. The question is not whether pseudo-Biblical speculative histories, based on much older historical texts, were available in the 1820s. The question is: how much was speculation, and how much was history? I'm saying there is a lot more ancient history to the Book of Mormon than the 17th-19th century theology would suggest.
  14. Rajah Manchou

    Why Not Engage the Evidence for Historicity?

    I don’t know either. I have a couple of scenarios that work better than any other model I’ve heard, but the version I am most interested in here is the one that allows the Book of Mormon to be exactly what it claims to be, a record of first temple Israelites that was compiled and abridged by Christians in the 5th century AD, and later translated into English to be published in 1830. Something like: Following the Deuteronomist reforms, first temple Israelites departed Jerusalem in the 6th century BC. Some went south to the Sena or Saana region (not far from Nehhem) in Yemen and then east to a port on the coast of Oman. Carrying a set of brass plates, they boarded a ship and ventured east to what they would have known as Sinim or Ophir, a land across the great sea. Following the coast, they arrive around 589 BC at the Strait of Malacca and finding it impossible to go any further, stopped there. They began smelting iron at a point that archaeologists have recently dated to 582 BC. I propose that the founders of this civilization were at some point identified as Israelites, and over the next 2500 years, speculation about them would result in texts such as the History of the Rechabites, the Lebor Gabála Érenn and the Book of Mormon. I'll stop there for now. It is easier to process one data point at a time, and there's no need to go farther if I am wrong about the above. Do you see anything impossible/anachronistic with what I have proposed so far?
  15. Rajah Manchou

    Horses in the Book of Mormon

    I’m making a broader case for the Book of Mormon being a 16th/17th century adaptation/translation of Hebrew literature about the land just beyond the Sabbath River, where the Sons of Moses and lost tribes lived. There are medieval texts that place this mythical land in a real world setting in the Malay Archipelago. Literature describing the land beyond the Sambation lists sheep, goats, and oxen. Wild goats are also described in the Keddah annals, which were influenced by Persian and Arabic literature. These texts refer to the serow, a type of goat/antelope that resembles the ibex.
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