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Rajah Manchou

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About Rajah Manchou

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    Separates Water & Dry Land

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  1. Rajah Manchou

    Statement on Book of Mormon geography

    I have gone. It is just as easy to go southward as it would be to go northward. There's no place in Mesoamerica that anyone would stand and think, hey I'm almost completely surrounded by water, except for that one narrow neck of land to my north.
  2. Rajah Manchou

    Statement on Book of Mormon geography

    Simple and effortless, if only the geography proposed in these papers and letters matched the descriptions in the Book of Mormon. They do not match at all, making this a very complicated topic.
  3. Rajah Manchou

    Statement on Book of Mormon geography

    The internal Book of Mormon geography is seen as an island or a peninsula because Mormon states that the land of Nephi and the land of Zarahemla "were nearly surrounded by water, there being a small neck of land between the land northward and the land southward". (Alma 22:32) It's hard to identify any place on the American continent that fits this description.
  4. Rajah Manchou

    Statement on Book of Mormon geography

    It fits Ten Lost Tribes narratives in the same way that the Book of Mormon does: (1) A tent-dwelling Biblical tribe migrates to Jerusalem following the Assyrian captivity. (2) God covenants with this group that they will always stand before him. (3) God leads this group to an unidentified island where they live a completely separate existence from those in the Old World. (4) This group of isolated Israelites keeps records of their history. Additionally: (1) Scholars have identified the island where this narrative (which became popular in Slavonic and Russian literature) took place as the island known anciently as Rahma/Comoro. (2) The geography of Rahma/Comoro matches the geography of the Book of Mormon. (3) The history of Rahma/Comoro aligns with the narrative in the Book of Mormon, including a founding date of 582 BC and the destruction of their civilization (known then as Komoriyya) in the 5th century AD following a battle between hundreds of thousands or warriors. There are only two options here: (1) there are two unrelated coincidental narratives of Israelites being led by God in 600 BC to an island that matches the internal geography of the Book of Mormon known as Ramah/Cumorah that was destroyed in the 5th century AD, or (2) the Book of Mormon narrative is based on narrative of Rechabites sailing to the island of Rahma/Kamara. Can you think of any other explanations for this?
  5. Rajah Manchou

    Statement on Book of Mormon geography

    Would be interested to hear your thoughts on the design of the boats in the Book of Mormon.
  6. Rajah Manchou

    Statement on Book of Mormon geography

    I've always enjoyed rodheadlee's insights on sailing, and I'm in no way trying to lecture anybody. My point in looking at an entirely different geography for the Book of Mormon is to discuss new questions in new ways. For example, did you know that there are ancient texts that tell of a group of Israelites leaving Jerusalem in 600 BC and arriving on an unidentified island where they live completely isolated from the Old World? These accounts are, in my opinion, extremely significant, yet completely overlooked by models that look only at the American mainland.
  7. Rajah Manchou

    Statement on Book of Mormon geography

    Accomplished sailsmanship could do it, but currents alone would not drive them to South America, but rather directly into the Malay Peninsula, and with 600 BC technology there'd be no easy way past that peninsula. Below is a (slow-loading) gif showing where currents pushed marine plastics in this study, right to the point where we find a new civilization arriving by boat on the Malay Peninsula in 582 BC, 7 years after the Lehites departed Arabia. Someone was following the Lehite's path in that same decade.
  8. Rajah Manchou

    Statement on Book of Mormon geography

    If Joseph had no clear idea of the setting then why do we even assume it was America? Our assumption (based on Joseph's claim that an angel told him) that it is set in the Americas causes the biggest problem for the text. Drop that assumption and the text can speak for itself, there is no known geography. As an Old World text without any clear geographical setting, the text has no anachronisms. Why should we believe Joseph even had the right continent? Can't we simply say it is an ancient text, and we have no idea where the setting was? Why must we force it anywhere?
  9. Rajah Manchou

    How to reconcile Hagoth and the Heartland Theory?

    More recent studies argue that sweet potatoes drifted across the Pacific 100,000 years ago. https://www.sciencenews.org/article/sweet-potatoes-might-have-arrived-polynesia-long-humans I agree it is possible that Polynesians reached the Americas during the Book of Mormon time period, and there is some evidence to support it. However I haven't seen much evidence to support the claim that Native Americans sailed across the Pacific independent of the Polynesians and their technology. The identification of native American DNA on Easter Island was something I felt could have been strong evidence for it, but that has since been shown to be post-Columbian admixture. https://www.abc.net.au/news/science/2017-10-13/who-were-the-ancient-easter-islanders/9040266 As you know, I'm not arguing that Polynesians aren't related to the Hagoth narrative. There's textual evidence in the 1st century Periplus of the Erythraean Sea of an unidentified people sailing from the east to the west in massive ships. A 3rd century text called Strange Things from the South says these ships could hold 600-700 people and 260-1000 tons of cargo. These are the only ships during the Book of Mormon time period that match the Hagoth account.
  10. Rajah Manchou

    How to reconcile Hagoth and the Heartland Theory?

    We can't ignore the evidence that Polynesians came from Taiwan, and before that, mainland Southeast Asia. There's nothing to support the claim that Polynesians came from the Americas, and before that, Jerusalem. Hagoth's ships were large enough to hold hundreds of people with supplies. Is there any evidence of shipbuilding in Mesoamerica?
  11. Rajah Manchou

    Statement on Book of Mormon geography

    For kicks I've superimposed this fantasy map over the peninsula of ancient Comoro/Kamara, where civilization first appears in 582 BC. Lehi sailed directly through a perfect match for the Book of Mormon geography. To make things more interesting, Arabic accounts of this peninsula claim that the grandsons of Noah sailed there after the fall of the tower. 1st to 4th century Judeo-Christian texts tell of a group of Israelites being led by God to this location in 600 BC.
  12. Rajah Manchou

    Statement on Book of Mormon geography

    Sounds fun. Mons and Mormons throw the best parties.
  13. Luman wasn't just in Paris. He was allegedly in Paris to study. If those studies place him anywhere close to the writings of french orientalists like Silvestre de Sacy, then much of the Book of Mormon narrative can be accounted for.
  14. Rajah Manchou

    Statement on Book of Mormon geography

    Nah. My model doesn't exclude the Americas, or the West Indies as they would have been known to anybody writing a history in Early Modern English. The unanswered and undiscussed questions that Rajah Manchou still has are: (1) Who were the grandsons of Noah that departed in boats just after the destruction of the tower and arrived on a peninsula called Comoro/Kamara? (2) Who was the merchant who woke up from a divine vision to find instruments leading him to board a ship to become the founder of civilization in southern Comoro/Kamara? (3) Why does the founding myth of northern Kamara align with the account of the Mulekites, namely an exiled prince from the near east arriving in a new land? (4) Why do the archaeological findings of ancient Comoro/Kamara date to within 10 years of the Lehite arrival? (5) Why do we not know more about these accounts throughout history of Israelites, Rechabites and the Sons of Moses leaving Jerusalem (with brass plates) in 600 BC and sailing to a peninsula called Rahma/Kamara? A new DNA paper confirms that the Karen and Mon tribes (who founded ancient Kamara) came from the middle east and the near east. In other words, it is confirmed that the people that I claim are related to the Book of Mormon narrative are R1a1a1b (Mon) and G1b (Karen). These are western haplogroups (Iran and the Middle East) arriving on a peninsula named Comoro/Kamara during the Book of Mormon time period carried by tribes who claim to have once had a Golden Book of God that was lost, but will be returned. In other words, every aspect of the Book of Mormon fits into history.
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