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      Contact Us Broken   09/27/2016

      Users, It has come to our attention that the contact us feature on the site is broken.  Please do not use this feature to contact board admins.  Please go through normal channels.  If you are ignored there then assume your request was denied. Also if you try to email us that email address is pretty much ignored.  Also don't contact us to complain, ask for favors, donations, or any other thing that you may think would annoy us.  Nemesis

bsjkki

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About bsjkki

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  1. ...and which part of the country you live in. In Kansas, some did not like Mormon's much and there were many shared experiences of discrimination in my ward. It's the only place I lived where some parents would not let their kids play with the Mormon kids or not let them on home school baseball leagues.
  2. I'm helping my child edit a paper on the dangers of technology and the addictive qualities of the internet. This board must have designed the 'reputation points' to trigger the brains reward center and keep us returning again and again and again.
  3. lds.org in it's Mental Health section answered the question this way. https://www.lds.org/mentalhealth?lang=eng An inability to feel the Spirit, or a general feeling of apathy or numbness, is often a symptom of poor mental health. God has not forsaken you. Even Christ, in the Garden of Gethsemane, felt the Spirit withdraw for a time, but then God sent an angel to support Him (see Luke 22:41–44). Consider for a moment that the Spirit may be communicating with you in a different way than you have experienced thus far in your life. When you struggle to feel the Spirit, or to feel anything at all, try combining these suggestions with prayer as you are able: I can’t feel the Spirit. Is it my fault that I’m struggling? Do I just need more faith? An inability to feel the Spirit, or a general feeling of apathy or numbness, is often a symptom of poor mental health. God has not forsaken you. Even Christ, in the Garden of Gethsemane, felt the Spirit withdraw for a time, but then God sent an angel to support Him (see Luke 22:41–44). Consider for a moment that the Spirit may be communicating with you in a different way than you have experienced thus far in your life. When you struggle to feel the Spirit, or to feel anything at all, try combining these suggestions with prayer as you are able: Counsel with others. Make every effort to counsel together with your family, bishop, or mental health professional. Thoughtfully implement helpful recommendations. Remember what you knew. Find an old journal entry that describes a spiritual experience or talk to someone you trust. Have that person remind you of personal strengths, spiritual experiences, and testimony that you’ve shared with them in the past. Fill your home with light. Literally turn on lights or sit in the sunshine. Play uplifting music, listen to talks from general conference, look at artwork, or read the scriptures or another good book. Make your home a place of peace where the Spirit can dwell. Check in with yourself. Consider whether or not you can feel anything right now. If you feel numb or disconnected, talk to a trusted friend, family member, or Church leader, or seek professional help. I feel mental illness is such a broad term. I think in some cases, people may have an illness where they cannot feel the spirit but for others, the spirit can still be felt.
  4. I gave him a point for you!
  5. She also said this: The Fine Print It’s difficult to get an answer to the “Mormon women vs. other women” question because the studies are all measuring slightly different things. For example, the NMS had people agree or disagree with the statement, “I have taken or am currently taking medication for depression or another mental health issue.” This can tell us a lot, but it won’t tell us everything we want to know. First, there’s the issue of non-specific mental health diagnoses. Depression is included here, yes, but so are many other possibilities, from ADHD to zoophobia and everything in between. So it’s hardly an apples-to-apples comparison. Second, there’s the problem of timing: the question was worded to include anyone who has taken medication for mental health at any point in life, not just right now. So if you took it after your first child was born and you had postpartum depression, you’d still answer “yes” to the question even if you haven’t taken it for years. And third, those who are taking or have taken medication aren’t the same as the wider population of those who might have – or ought to have – a mental health diagnosis. It’s important to be responsible about what this question does and does not measure, but it’s also revealing to examine who in the Mormon world answered yes.
  6. This is what she says about comparisons to non-members and why women have higher rates of depression than men. I don't think she surveyed non-members at all but tried to look at other studies. What is going on here? Are Mormon women really that much more depressed than Mormon men? And if so, is it because the culture places unrealistic expectations on their shoulders to be perfect moms with flawless bodies and unwavering testimonies? Is it because more Mormons are stay-at-home moms than American women more generally, and are therefore cut off from the social networks and self-esteem that can come from paid employment? Both of these have been put forward as possible explanations. Maybe. I am withholding judgment for a couple of reasons. First, the rate of Mormon women suffering from depression may actually be lower than the national average for women. The data on this is inconsistent, though; Timothy Heaton’s research has indeed found that “LDS women are significantly higher in depression than non-LDS women.” So there is no consensus here.
  7. Jana Reiss has another study about LDS women and depression. These are her findings: http://religionnews.com/2017/04/25/mormon-women-and-depression-revisited/ Age matters little, though younger women are a tiny bit more likely than older ones to take medication. It was interesting that in a survey that showed so much generational variation on other questions, this issue was similar across all four generations of LDS adults. Employment matters a little but not very much. The rates for women who were unemployed and not looking for work were five points higher than those who worked full-time and just one point higher than those who worked part-time. So it’s possible that there’s a correlation between being a stay-at-home mother and being more likely to be depressed, but the difference is small. And correlation is not necessarily causation in any case. Democrats are about nine points more likely to take medication than women who lean or vote Republican. We see more significant difference related to church activity. Women who consider themselves “very active” Mormons are less likely to report taking medication for depression (22.5%) than women who are “not at all active” in the Church (35%). Along those lines, about a quarter of women who believe “all or most Mormon teachings” have taken medication, compared to more than a third who doubt or find some Mormon teachings hard to believe. Women who have no children at all are a little more likely to take medication for depression than women who have one, two, or three children. In families of four or more children, women are also a bit more likely take medication. Overall, the women who were least likely to take medication for depression were those with one, two, or three children. There does seem to be a correlation with divorce. Women who were divorced were almost twice as likely as married women to have taken medication for depression (41% vs. 23%). Never-married women fall in the middle at 34%. I hope these findings can put to rest some of the glib conclusions people have come to in the past. The reality is nuanced and complex. The Deseret News also has an article on this topic. http://www.deseretnews.com/article/865678684/Survey-explores-the-relationship-between-Mormon-women-and-depression.html
  8. Thank you! Perfect description of this "fake" controversy.
  9. Did you read what Samlan and Calm had to say about this on this thread? Where is the error in their analysis?
  10. Yeah, that's why I don't want to analyze it. I hate listening to podcasts. 😉 Hopefully it's as shallow as the Stevenson criticism.
  11. Can you refute the analysis of the critics of the Tsunami story? Both Calm and Samlan have reviewed the critics and found their case is highly questionable. It seems to come down to an out of context interpretation of the word "all. Their analysis is found on this thread. So far no one has tackled the Bragg story about the fire but I could have missed it.
  12. I think you are making many assumptions based on my use of term women's issues.
  13. I don't know where you get this?
  14. But it's politics tied to Mormonism so if everybody behaves, the thread may last a little bit.
  15. Thank goodness! I am grateful to live in this day and the opportunities my daughters have. I am grateful I was not raised when racists views were common and acceptable. I am grateful the church no longer encourages gay men to marry straight women because they have realized this approach fails and causes undue hardship on gay men, their ex-wives and their children. I'm not a Bible scholar but God has always had to work within the framework of societal norms and culture and sometimes that meant his chosen people had to wander around for 40 years waiting for ingrained, false, cultural habits to die off. From my understanding, the Priesthood ban would have been rescinded sooner if the Prophet and Apostles would have been able to all agree but they could not. Culture can be a hindrance for the development of a righteous people. I won't go into detail on my issues--I've hashed them out a bit here before and I am moving forward. I've seen some progress on women's issues in the church and I have no doubt, improvements will continue. https://dialoguejournal.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/Dialogue_V35N01_157.pdf