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alter idem

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About alter idem

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    Separates Water & Dry Land

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  1. There are lots of situations where a woman could be leading men besides Primary. Activities commitee, Family History, Gospel Doctrine and single Adults, Any situation where a husband and wife work together and help others (which might be men), Other stake and ward committees such as Youth conferences, Girls camp, Stake Plays, concerts, Stake Primary, Relief Society and Young Women all have high council members assigned to them, and when I served in the Stake Relief Society, we directed the men on what we needed them to do to help us with our activities. They never complained. I really don't see that this is a valid argument that Riess has tried to create because too many of us who've actually served in the church have had very different experiences from what she's claiming.
  2. Interesting, thanks. I did not know about this guy. For some reason I thought it was Club DV8 that was damaged, thanks. Snuffer seems to be a draw for certain members who lean toward fundamentalism in the church, except that they reject polygamy, which was not the case for earlier fundamentalists.
  3. I'm saying that I haven't noticed what Riess is claiming, that women aren't listened to because men hold all the leadership roles. I'm saying that the differences I've noticed have to do with people, and their style of leadership, not their sex.
  4. Women do not hold Priesthood authority to lead the church, you are correct. That doesn't mean they don't hold power within the church. They are not always simply advisory. If a woman serves as Primary President, Young Women President, Relief Society President, and the correlating stake positions, they 'lead', these are not advisory positions, if they are working as they were meant to. What makes men not listen to women is their own insecurities, personal weaknesses or arrogance. As I mentioned, this often means they don't listen to other men as well. I agree, men who don't listen to the spirit when serving in leadership roles, can also mean they don't listen to women or to other men. IMO, Some of what Riess wrote may have a bit of truth in certain situations, but so much of what she said was overgeneralized and biased; just plain wrong and does more damage than good. If she'd wanted to change hearts and minds, be an influence for good, she certainly went about it in the wrong way.
  5. As a woman who has served in various leadership callings, I can tell you from my experience she's incorrect in her broad conclusions. Men are not 'groomed' and they aren't 'conditioned'. In fact, from my experience, men in the church listen to women a lot more than men in the secular world. IMO, what Riess has offered is her own particular conditioning/bias on this subject and a knee jerk reaction to it. She's assumes that men in leadership positions react as a block and they all don't listen to women as a rule. She's ignoring what I've found, which is that it's not that simple. It is true that some men in leadership positions don't listen to women, but they also don't listen to other men for that matter. It's not the fault of the church or how it's organized, but the fault of the individual. A good example is that Bishops need to be married to serve, and with only some exceptions, Stake Pres, General Authorities, Apostles are all married. That means that unless they are an unusual man who doesn't listen or consult his wife, they are influenced greatly by the women around them and if anything they are 'conditioned' to do so, from birth to a nurturing mother and continuing on with Primary teachers, female scout leaders, Primary presidents, counselors and of course, the YW pres. who holds as much and sometimes more power than the YM pres. in a ward. Then there's the Relief Society Pres. They have a great deal of influence in a ward--unless they are serving under a Bishop who doesn't utilize them, but if that's the case, he likely doesn't utilize the men in his ward either. Personally, I think one of the good things that came out of polygamy during the short duration it was practiced, was to put the influence of women more firmly in the governing and evolution of the church. It was done during a time when Victorian women had little influence or power in the secular world, and upset the cultural norm by putting more female influence on the men who served in leadership, because they outnumbered them in the most important place of influence--the home. The reason this was a positive influence was because the church already had a system of egalitarianism where women were seen as valued members of the community who worked alongside the men and enjoyed the same spiritual gifts etc. It would not have had the same effect in a church that limited women's role to child bearing and domestic work. It would seem that Riess incorrectly perceives the church's attitude toward women to be the latter.
  6. I'm glad to hear she's a nice person, but nothing she described in her blog was anything I've experienced in the church. I think it was all an overreaction of some sort.
  7. And, was it a gay bar?? I don't remember that. I thought it was a dance club that took some damage. I'd say his prediction about the the Temple was a bust, no doubt, he'll come up with some excuse for why it wasn't destroyed by a tornado, maybe say the Lord is giving the church 'more time'...that's a popular excuse. I don't know of this Bryce Bartel either. Is he a recent convert to the Remnant group? I haven't been keeping up on what's going on with them for a while now, so maybe I missed reading about him. There was an article or blog a couple of years back that was making the rounds among the remnant called 'Joseph fought polygamy' which is a reintroduction of the old RLDS claims that it was Brigham Young who was responsible They go further, I believe and say he and other leaders were practicing it and Joseph tried to stop them and got killed because of it. I read one claim that said Willard Richards shot Joseph (I think the guy claimed he saw it in a dream or vision???) and somehow the mob was accused. I guess they were just innocently milling around outside the jail and ended up being blamed? I thought Denver Snuffer at one time accepted that Joseph was involved in it, but only for dynastic purposes? Not sure, but that's what I recall from years ago, but now, I wonder if he's changed his position because this new revised non-history seems popular among some of his supporters.
  8. This is a reconstruction of a skull. Here are more skull reconstructions from the same area and time. https://www.visiontv.ca/2013/04/08/biblical-forensics-a-new-series-bringing-biblical-faces-back-to-life/ Seems like there was variation in features and there's room for speculation as to what he actually did look like.
  9. I would do it; if I felt prompted to, such as in an emergency and no priesthood holder available, etc. The reason I would is that I have heard counsel from temple sealers while in the temple, a couple of times over the years that women can give blessings to their family members through the power of faith. They lay hands on the head, pronounce blessing and they do not use consecrated oil.
  10. Julie Rowe learned her craft (paid money to become a healing coach) from the Emotion Code founder, Bradley Nelson. He's LDS and it's likely she learned the whole mixing religion and priesthood from other LDS healers. It's not just the healing practices of praying etc, but it involves freeing the patient from troubled ancestors' spirits (this is my understanding of it) that they claim are causing the problems to their health and well-being. But, it needs sessions to do this and they cost money for the sessions, though some Energy healers insist they do it for free. They don't have to touch the person, as noted, Julie Rowe does telephone sessions which cost a lot of money as well. I think it is placebo and takes advantage of desperate people trying to feel better. I was really glad when Elder Ballard spoke up to caution members against this practice. Some energy healers listened and quit, but not Julie Rowe. She and others ignored or rationalized his warnings.
  11. I have no knowledge if some church members involved in essential oils and alternative healing practices are using consecrated oil mixed with essential oils, or anointing the body parts. Years ago, I worked with several women who were into essential oils and I know some women who use them, but never discussed it with them. Some of them used midwives and alternative doctors, but that's all I know. I'm like Calm, I use essential oils that I like the smell, in a diffuser to make my room smell nice, they sell them all over now so I think they've gone mainstream as far as aromatherapy goes.
  12. I think they never bothered to mention it to you, because by that time, it was still common for women going into labor and for women's health issues and maybe you being a young boy, wouldn't have been privy to discussions. The practice of women giving blessings was common in the church up till the Leaders started discouraging it and asking members to call the Elders. The practice died down with more hospital births that would have been the 1920's to 30's, but I think that with the reemergence of midwifery the past couple of decades and also alternative healing practices, some women in the church are going back to these old practices. The sisters often didn't just lay hands on head, but would also anoint the affected parts of the body. A Book that gives information on the history of women giving blessings is 'Sisters in Spirit'. So, yes, the practice was more common than you'd think among church members up until about the 1930's.
  13. It seems that the focus of her church leaders was her energy healing first and then her podcasts. She's back in force with her energy healing work. I just recently listened to a podcast (it was announcements) and she mentioned that she was doing some energy classes. 300.00 dollars for a day of classes (and this was the early bird price) and they had almost 100 people signed up--in Provo Utah. That is what surprised me. And that's a lot of money for Julie Rowe to be making so it would seem her energy work is lucrative. She holds many of these seminars so the money surely adds up. She took her podcasts down for a while, but after being exed, she's been doing them again and is now putting them all back up. I don't agree that the brethren are restricting healing, women can lay hands on head and pronounce blessings through the power of faith. But, the essential oils are very new age and involve spending a lot of money for tiny little vials that are supposed to have all kinds of purposes, is not part of that healing by faith, IMO.
  14. 2 Nephi 1:6-7 "Wherefore, I, Lehi, prophesy according to the workings of the Spirit which is in me, that there shall none come into this land save they shall be brought by the hand of the Lord. Wherefore this land is consecrated unto him whom he shall bring. And if it so be that they shall serve him according to the commandments which he hath given, it shall be a land of liberty unto them; wherefore, they shall never be brought down unto captivity;..."
  15. What are the 'brethren' supposed to do about a bisexual man who marries, supposedly happily enough to have five children and then in his 60's decides to leave his wife. In my opinion, claiming to be 'gay' is to gain sympathy, and it sure seems to be working. His family has my sympathy, he's made choices, and when those choices make his miserable, then he'll get my sympathy.
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