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Hamba Tuhan

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About Hamba Tuhan

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    Places Sun, Moon & Stars In The Sky

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  1. They didn't 'delete the words'. They elided them. This is standard practice. And then they intentionally and clearly marked the elision by including points of ellipsis. This is also standard practice. And then they provided the reference to the source material so that anyone who might want to could look up the quotation in its entirety. This is likewise standard practice. And anyone who actually goes back and reads Pres Snow's sermon in its entirety will quickly realise that the meme you posted is not just mistaken or even mildly dishonest but is a blatant attempt to deceive. The sermon calls the Saints to repentance for not having been paying their tithes and thanks those who have recently repented. Some selected quotes: 'No man can keep this law unless he pay a conscientious tithing' (p. 27). 'Bishop Preston ... would show you that the name of every man, woman and child who pays tithing is recorded [in the book of the law of the Lord] and none others' (p. 27). Please note how I handled this quote. Then I invite you to look at the entire paragraph it has been taken from and tell me if I have not been faithful to the original. Also, please note how one gets her or his name in the book of the law of the Lord. 'The Lord manifested to me most clearly ... to teach this principle to the Latter-day Saints, because there had been woeful neglect of this law, and the Latter-day Saints should be shown the necessity of observing this law most faithfully' (p. 28) Same deal holds on the elision in this quote. 'In looking over the books we found that a great many of the Latter-day Saints had not paid one cent of tithing. I was perfectly astonished, for I had no idea that there had been so much neglect' (p. 28). Note that not paying any tithing is a source of astonishment, not something he would expect -- and in fact is considered 'neglect'. 'I know the Lord will forgive the Latter-day Saints for their past negligence in paying tithing, if they will now repent and pay a conscientious tithing from this time on' (p. 28). And lastly: 'It is God's truth that the time has now come when He will not look favorably upon our negligence of this principle. I plead with you in the name of the Lord, and I pray that every man, woman and child who has means shall pay one-tenth of their income as a tithing' (p. 28). By the way, Pres Snow consistently used the word means in this sermon to refer to income/money. Specifically check out pp. 23 and 24. So, important question: If the person who crafted the meme you posted actually checked this sermon, why did s/he then design the meme to convey a demonstrably false impression?
  2. I'm not sure 'looser' is what you meant to write here ...
  3. This. People who pontificate on this topic always seem to pass right over this. We had a family in our ward a few years ago when I was serving in the bishopric. She lost her job, and they could no longer afford to pay tithing and make their home loan repayments. Since we know the blessings of tithing, this is easy. I encouraged them to tithe, and the ward contributed what was needed to meet their loan obligations until their situation improved. It's just that simple. No, let's do. If one consults the 19th-century Dictionary of American English, one will find the definition of the word means current at the time that Pres Snow spoke these words: 'income, revenue'. And if one consults the Cambridge English Dictionary, mindful of the fact that Pres Snow had a good education and may have spoken a more British English, one will find that the British definition was quite similar: 'money, for example from an income'. So what did Pres Snow say to the Saints in 1899? That every man, woman and child with an income should tithe. Now, what does an honest person do with a historical quote when the meaning of a word has shifted enough that the original intention might be misconstrued? One option would be to insert '[an income]' in place of 'means'. But of course, that would still result in people falsely accusing the Church of quote fiddling. One could also leave the quote intact but add an explanation in a footnote. In a piece of academic writing, that would be preferred. Or one could do exactly what the Church has done in this case. But to pretend that the Church has altered this quote in order to obscure a doctrinal shift is historically inaccurate, misleading, and, quite possibly, dishonest.
  4. Joseph Smith: One of my faves! (Not just the quote but the lived experience of it.)
  5. For contrast, I share a 118m2 three-bedroom townhouse with two housemates. According to Google, that's roughly 1,270 sq feet. Personally, I would be clinically depressed if I lived alone in a house this size, and that would only multiply for me in a larger space. To each his own. These are American problems. Our universities are still affordable, with most fees capped and these caps tied directly to expected future incomes. If students can't pay full fees upfront, the government will do so, and then repayments only kick in once earnings reach a certain level. 'Interest' is limited to the rate of inflation. Our minimum wage is about double America's, and our incomes are much, much flatter. Average lifetime earnings of tradesmen and most graduates are roughly equal. And yet, if anything, our families are in even worse shape. We definitely live in interesting times.
  6. I'll take a female doctor over a man any day! Brigham Young was right on that point. Our bishopric members attend Young Women classes and activities as often as they can. I certainly did when I was one. The Handbook makes it clear that that's supposed to happen:
  7. But that's the thing. It's not my revelation. It has to be God's, or it's worthless. Elsewhere on this forum, I've posted about what happened when God told me -- in spoken words in, of all places, the temple's font -- to disagree with my stake president. Because it was of God, it all worked out beautifully in the end, with my stake president and my bishop all independently receiving the exact same message. Genuine revelation is a beautiful thing. Too many times, however, we Church members get into real trouble concluding that every thought and feeling we have is somehow God talking to us. It's not. And even when He tells us that we are right, He often tells us just to wait for Him to take care of things. The Kingdom is His; He knows how to guide and shape it according to His master plan.
  8. This absolutely does not match my personal experience. I still have former Young Men who speak with gratitude for every single interaction they were blessed to have with all three members of our bishopric ... and amazingly, they include me as both Young Men president and then as bishopric counsellor for Young Men. One of them is a few metres away from me right now; we're work colleagues. Last week he tearfully thanked me for investing in him one-on-one over the course of many difficult years. Another one has been texting me off and on over the course of the day to update me on how he's been going at university. His last year of school, he was at the end of my dining table 4-5 hours every evening working on assignments, often with me sitting next to him giving help. Are you sure you aren't projecting your personal dread onto the girls you work with?
  9. As far as they align with revelation, both canonised and personal. Nearly everywhere ... right up to the point where revelation and personal experience resolve my questions. Privately? Anything. Publicly? Anything specific revelation has told me that I should. I know from repeated personal experience that the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is the Kingdom of God on the Earth, complete with priesthood keys of authority and the power of revelation. Why would I want to be anywhere else?
  10. Mate, this isn’t my theory! I just like accuracy. Though now I’m intrigued to go back and look at some historical Malay scripts, of which there are several.
  11. It's Malay. Or Melayu in Malay. I don't know why you're adding the extra 'y'.
  12. Agreed. And this is where we disagree. Severely. My interactions with the Lord are not some fancy dress I put on my own inner conflicts. He's not my conscience or an inner light. He's a real man. My Father, in fact. And when I welcome His involvement in whatever inner conflict I'm engaged in, everything changes. The two Beings who spoke to Joseph in the grove were not mere projections of his conscience, nor were they a metaphor for an 'inner light'. After all his questioning, he didn't have the answer he needed anywhere inside of himself. He needed outside help. That's kind of the whole point of the Restoration. We have the same access to an actual Heavenly Father and an actual Saviour that Joseph did. I find it perplexing that, as a Latter-day Saint, you don't want God to be any bigger than your own best thoughts.
  13. Maybe the crazy women and the lazy men will be good matches? Or maybe that's why God has mansions for single people too?
  14. Sometimes I wonder how God will be able to find a wife for me in the eternities, and then I read statements like this ...
  15. Not anymore. Some years ago, when I was serving as my ward's Young Men president, I was in the temple praying for my boys. I asked Heavenly Father what more I could do for them. I told him that I would 'do anything'. The answer came in a clear voice: 'You could fast for them'. I pointed out that I already fasted for them every month. 'You could fast for them every week'. I was appalled at this suggestion and started to argue against it. 'I thought you said you would do anything'. So I started fasting every week. I was released from that callling and called to serve in the bishopric (with Young Men responsibilities) in 2012. I was relased from the bishopric and called to serve as ward mission leader 18 months later. But I've never felt that that personal request has been rescinded, so I've continued to fast for my boys every week for more than a decade. I no longer have any interest in food when I fast, though I do sometimes get thirsty, especially when it's really hot. Oh, I face all kinds of temptations. And I wrestle with myself on many occasions. But there is a whole world of difference between arguing within myself and hearing the voice of God correct and guide me.
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