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cinepro

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About cinepro

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    It's pronounced "cinepro"

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    Southern California

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  1. cinepro

    Church Finances---official source

    So if someone doesn't pay their tithing, what happens (both in this life and the next)?
  2. cinepro

    Church Finances---official source

    If you're going to tell people that if the lack of transparency bothers them they shouldn't donate, then it would be more expected than interesting.
  3. cinepro

    Church Finances---official source

    I think the difference in regards to the benefits of transparency between an organization that claims to represent God and asks, on His behalf, for its members to give it 10% of their income and a private individual who isn't soliciting anything from anyone is self evident. If you can't see it, then I'll probably have to chalk this one up to LDS Goggles and agree to disagree.
  4. cinepro

    Church Finances---official source

    I'm guessing you don't know very much about the Church's history with finances.
  5. cinepro

    1st Pres. and NAACP

    Just in case people forget, there were only 10 apostles who participated in the actual meeting where it was decided to rescind the ban. Mark E. Petersen was on assignment in South America, and Delbert Stapley was in the hospital. Both were informed after the fact that the revelation had come and was going to be published, and both supported it, but they weren't there for any deliberation or voting that may have been conducted during the process of receiving that revelation. On a totally unrelated note, Petersen and Stapley had a record of being more "traditional" in their views on race and the Priesthood.
  6. Just to be clear, you're holding out for an explanation that is "satisfying"? Like, you're going to hear a theory and everything will click and you'll say "Now that makes sense!" Because I think once the Church stopped supporting the curse-of-Cain or pre-mortal-wimpiness theories, we shifted from looking for theories that are "satisfying" to trying to find a theory that doesn't make God look like a racist fool or decades of LDS leadership to be (sometimes unknowingly, but usually overtly) racist. Perhaps in the future, the apologetic messiah will come forth and reveal a new theory that encompasses all the data, but until then, I fear we are destined to be "unsatisfied."
  7. cinepro

    Church Finances---official source

    I think the key difference is whether or not he is asking you to donate money to his cause.
  8. Just to be clear, you're suggesting that God wouldn't allow worthy black members of the Church to receive Temple blessings or hold the Priesthood mainly as a disincentive for white people to not want to marry them? As I've said so many times before, the reason I don't believe the ban came from God is because God would have to be stupid to create the ban for any of the proposed reasons (and the implementation of the ban was unworkable to anyone with a basic understanding of genetics). If I have to choose between believing that God was stupid and racist or Brigham Young was stupid and racist, I'm going to go with Brigham Young.
  9. cinepro

    Church Finances---official source

    Yeah, I didn't do the math. If all the active members just did a few hours of service a year, then it wouldn't be hard to reach 25 million hours.
  10. No one is doubting the surety of knowledge gained by experiencing the Holy Spirit. The problem is that sometimes that knowledge be wrong. It varies from person to person, but I would estimate that the reliability of knowledge from the Holy Ghost is somewhere between 50 - 80% (so, coin toss at the worst, 4/5 chance of being right at the best).
  11. cinepro

    Church Finances---official source

    This is an extremely relevant article in a law journal about the exemption churches have from public disclosure laws, and the arguments that they should not be exempt: THE LAW AND FINANCIAL TRANSPARENCY IN CHURCHES: RECONSIDERING THE FORM 990 EXEMPTION
  12. cinepro

    Church Finances---official source

    You do realize that 501(c) non-profits do have to disclose their financial statements, right? It's done on a Form 990. It's only churches that have a special exemption from this requirement. https://www.irs.gov/charities-non-profits/public-disclosure-and-availability-of-exempt-organizations-returns-and-applications-documents-subject-to-public-disclosure
  13. cinepro

    Church Finances---official source

    The problem, I suspect, is that Elder Oaks could be counting hours that Church members spend serving in the Church as "donated labor." If we're counting teaching a Sunday School class or doing Temple Work the same as picking up trash on the side of the road or volunteering at a homeless shelter, we should be clear about that.
  14. Right, but unless you actually point out why the skeptics are wrong, then they're probably right. Just acknowledging it doesn't make them wrong; it just shows that you are at least self aware enough to know how flimsy your theory is, and you hope that by mentioning the skeptics people that want to believe you will choose you over them without thinking too hard about it.
  15. My point is that acknowledging that you're describing an unreliable and psychologically unsound methodology for learning "truth" doesn't suddenly make your methodology sound. This is the same conundrum that James Randi (the magician/skeptic) ran into time and time again. He was especially perturbed by people who claimed to perform feats with their minds such as bending spoons. So Randi, a skilled illusionist himself, would show how he could do the exact same thing that the so-called miracle workers were doing (but without any supernatural power). But even if Randi could do the exact same thing without supernatural powers, that didn't prove that Uri Gellar wasn't doing it with supernatural powers, right? In the end, some people can (and will) choose to believe anything for whatever reason they want. It doesn't matter if the skeptics don't believe Gellar was bending spoons with his mind, or that Randi could do the exact same thing without supernatural help. Likewise, it's certainly possible the Holy Ghost is especially helpful to people who "bear testimony" of things they aren't actually sure of. But it also looks like he doesn't really need to be, because our minds are already designed towards belief (and belief preservation) for those things that we publicly express belief in. As long as we just do this for things that are true, then it's no problem. But hopefully no one will do this for Scientology or LuLaRoe, or they could accidentally find themselves "knowing" something that isn't true.
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