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cinepro

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About cinepro

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    It's pronounced "cinepro"

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  1. cinepro

    This American Life

    On the subject of apologies and what good it would do, I'm reminded of a recent study. We're all familiar with the fact that doctors sometimes make mistakes, and they have malpractice insurance to cover when they get sued for making mistakes. It also isn't a surprise that the perception is that if doctors apologize to the patient for making a mistake, the assumption is that having them admit the mistake opens them up to greater liability, and perhaps a greater judgement or settlement against them. But studies into that subject don't follow that expectation. For example: Apologies and Medical Error While Bishops interviews are obviously a different field of interaction, I wonder if there isn't something the Church could learn from that conclusion...?
  2. cinepro

    Disturbing New Statistics about Seminary

    My daughter had a teacher for her Old Testament year that hewed to a very orthodox view on many things and taught young-earth creationism, curse of Cain (black skin), insensitive and rude comments about homosexuals, (offending several students who had gay family members), disparaging comments to students who dared speak up, etc. We complained to CES and the stake leaders. Nothing was done. Conversely, my son had a fantastic teacher his freshman year. He was a young guy with a lot of energy and motivation who really put his heart into teaching. He had great lessons and really tried to relate to the kids. Some in CES thought he tried a little too hard, and he was released after two years (Bob Crockett probably knows who I'm talking about). From what I can tell, CES leadership can be pretty dang out of touch when it comes to what works with youth these days.
  3. Well, why doesn't Church spokesperson Daniel Woodruff tell us what the correct figures are?
  4. cinepro

    Disturbing New Statistics about Seminary

    Oh my gosh. When our oldest son was entering high school, it was a huge struggle to get him to go to Seminary from day one. I wasn't being very helpful, and when I pointed out to my wife that I have no problem making him go to Church but that Seminary is "optional", you would have thought I had suggested pulling him out of school and sending him to clown college. Your comment just gave me a flashback to that night on the couch... Ironically, our second child was very motivated to go to seminary, but then her Senior year they called the one teacher in the stake that my wife would not allow our daughter to be taught by, so we asked that she be allowed to do home study. They wouldn't allow it, so she didn't graduate We'll see if our third child is the one to actually make it. FWIW, among all the rumors of changes at the last Conference, I was hoping for reducing the number of Seminary days to something like Tuesday-Wednesday-Thursday or something like that. There's no reason it has to be five days a week.
  5. FYI, this is a great podcast about memory: Free Brian Williams
  6. cinepro

    This American Life

    One thing I can't figure out is why there is a "church's side of the equation" to this, and why this is the hill the Church wants to die on this year. Regular Bishop's interviews are simply a cultural tradition. The podcast claims that regular youth interviews with questions about chastity became a thing in the 1970s as a result of the sexual revolution. When Joseph Smith had the First Vision, it's not like Jesus said "Oh, and when you restore the Church, there will be people called 'Bishops' leading congregations and it's critical they regularly meet with the teenagers and ask them questions about sex." When John the Baptist restored the Aaronic Priesthood, he didn't say " “Upon you my fellow servants, in the name of Messiah, I confer the Priesthood of Aaron, which holds the keys of the ministering of angels, and of the gospel of repentance, and of asking teenagers invasive and probing questions about what they did on the hayride Saturday previous…" Since the Church doesn't do training on the subject, the current situation has evolved from tradition and each individual Bishop's ability to intuit how these interviews should go. Many (most?) seem to do a great job (I certainly never had a Bishop ask me anything that me uncomfortable), but some obviously don't. The PR guy should have at least had the cajones to tell the Church they're quickly losing the narrative on this and they need to do more than take a defensive position. If he didn't know it before the interview, I'm sure he realizes it now after the episode has been released.
  7. cinepro

    This American Life

    That being said, they obviously reached out to the Church for input, and they got the Director of Media Relations for the Church (Eric Hawkins). He did a yeoman's job trying to make the Church not look awful, but there's not much defense for what was being reported in the interviews. But it goes off the rails at 43:55 where the interviewer makes a very reasonable point that in order for things to get better (and perhaps some degree of comfort to be given to those who were mentally scarred in a Bishop's interview), the Church needs to admit that stuff was being discussed in a way that it shouldn't have been. But Hawkins, in the best tradition of PR representatives, can't allow himself to admit that anything "wrong" ever happened. He even offers a hypothetical where the interviewer would find some resolution by...going in and having an interview with a Bishop. We've just heard 30 minutes of cringe-inducing stories about Bishop's interviews, and the Church PR guy says that the best course of action is for her to go talk to a Bishop so he could "sit down and counsel with you to make sure you understood." Yes, Eric Hawkins, I'm sure the problem is that it was the young women who just didn't understand what was going on in these interviews, and they should go in for more interviews so they can be told how they should have felt. He also tries to deflect by saying "what I can't do is go back and change your experience, your perception, your feelings you had at that time." No dude, what you can do is say "Hey, the questions your Bishop asked you were too invasive and inappropriate, and we know that because of the psychological effect they had on you. No one should ever feel that way during a Bishop's interview, and if they do, the Bishop has done something wrong. It was also inappropriate for him to come and sit closer to you and put his hand on your knee when asking the questions. And it happened not just to you but to many other women, too many other women, even if the vast majority of Bishop's interviews didn't involve overly invasive questions. So on behalf of the Church, we're sorry, and we're taking actions to make sure these interviews are positive experiences for young men and women going forward." But I guess I would make a terrible PR guy.
  8. cinepro

    This American Life

    In case you're not familiar with it, "This American Life" isn't journalism. It's an NPR show that tells stories, usually centered around a theme. The stories usually have a producer or subject that directs the narrative. Complaining (or observing) that "This American Life" doesn't tell the "full/balanced story" is like complaining that an article in People magazine wasn't hard-hitting enough.
  9. cinepro

    This American Life

    I got a kick out of this article that was in Sunstone a while back. When Virgins Collide Might be a little more graphic than what you'll find in "LDS Living":
  10. Relevant Podcast: Not Making Babies in South Korea Why does South Korea have the lowest fertility rate in the world? The average South Korean woman is expected to have 1.05 children in her life - exactly half the rate needed to maintain a population. That means a shrinking workforce paying less taxes and more elderly people who will need expensive care. South Korea's government has pumped tens of billions of pounds into dealing with the problem over the past decade, but the fertility rate is still going down. In this whodunnit, Simon Maybin finds out who's not doing it - and why.
  11. FWIW, this podcast profiles some research that has been done that could drastically reduce the number of homes that burn in these wildfires. Sadly, their recommendations haven't been implemented. Built to Burn - 99% Invisible
  12. Lots of LDS are evacuating. And they've lost their building in "Paradise" (CA)...
  13. I'm sorry, but I have it on good authority that the name of a church is the best indicator as to what they believe and whom they worship. So I don't care what they say, if they call themselves the "Satanic Temple", then they must worship Satan.
  14. If the accusations against Snow were based on the same type of circumstances that the accusations against the Miles are, I would be just as skeptical. But as others have pointed out, the stories about Snow were told without the aid of a therapist, and the police investigation did, in fact, discover physical evidence of the claim. Add the subsequent actions against Snow in which she apparently never protested her innocence (maybe a false confession?), and they all lead me to be inclined to believe the charges.
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